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  1. What's Wrong with Genetic Inequality? The Impact of Genetic Technology on Elite Sports and Society.Claudio M. Tamburrini - 2007 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (2):229 – 238.
    Advances in genetic technology will enable us to intervene in human biological development to prevent and cure diseases, to restore individuals' functions and capacities back to a normal level after injury and even to enhance them beyond what has hitherto been considered as normal functioning for our species. Such a power to reshape and modify the human condition raises fundamental questions that touch upon the central core of morality. One of these questions is distributive justice. Will all people have equal (...)
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  • Transcending Human Limitations.Claudio M. Tamburrini & Torbjörn Tännsjö - 2007 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (2):113 – 118.
  • Should Athletes Be Allowed to Use All Kinds of Performance-Enhancing Drugs?—A Critical Note on Claudio M. Tamburrini.Thomas S. Petersen & Johannes K. Kristensen - 2009 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 36 (1):88-98.
  • Good Athlete - Bad Athlete? On the 'Role-Model Argument' for Banning Performance-Enhancing Drugs.Thomas Søbirk Petersen - 2010 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (3):332-340.
    The paper critically discusses a role-model argument (RMA) in favour of banning performance-enhancing drugs in sport. The argument concludes that athletes should be banned from using performance-enhancing drugs because if they are allowed to use such drugs they will encourage, or cause, youngsters who look up to them to use drugs in a way that would be harmful. In Section 2 the structure of the argument and some versions of it are presented. In Section 3 a critical discussion of RMA (...)
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  • Justice in Sport.Sigmund Loland - 2007 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (1):78 – 95.
    An attempt is made to articulate what is seen as a ?thin? interpretation of justice in sport and how this is understood in terms of ?thick? interpretations in various sociocultural settings. In this way, it is argued, sport can be better understood as a dynamic social practice. First, a thin interpretation of justice is formulated. Sport's structural goal is to measure, compare and rank competitors according to their performances. The rule systems of sport are based on more general norms that (...)
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  • Gene Doping and the Responsibility of Bioethicists.Ashkan Atry, Mats G. Hansson & Ulrik Kihlbom - 2011 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 5 (2):149 - 160.
    In this paper we will argue: (1) that scholars, regardless of their normative stand against or for genetic enhancement indeed have a moral/professional obligation to hold on to a realistic and up-to-date conception of genetic enhancement; (2) that there is an unwarranted hype surrounding the issue of genetic enhancement in general, and gene doping in particular; and (3) that this hype is, at least partly, created due to a simplistic and reductionist conception of genetics often adopted by bioethicists.
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  • The Woman in Black: Exposing Sexist Beliefs About Female Officials in Elite Men’s Football.Carwyn Jones & Lisa Louise Edwards - 2013 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 7 (2):202-216.
    In this paper, we argue that there are important differences between playing and non-playing roles in sport. The relevance of sex differences poses genuine philosophical and ethical difficulties for feminism in the context of playing sport. In the case of non-playing roles in general, and officiating in particular, we argue that reference to essential differences between men and women is irrelevant. Officiating elite men?s football is not a role for which ?essential? (psychological and biological) differences are causally implicated neither in (...)
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  • Who's Afraid of Stella Walsh? On Gender, 'Gene Cheaters', and the Promises of Cyborg Athletes.Kutte Jönsson - 2007 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (2):239 – 262.
    In this article, I argue that there are moral reasons to embrace the construction of self-designing and sex/gender-neutral cyborg athletes. In fact, with the prospect of advanced genetic and cyborg technology, we may face a future where sport (as we know it) occurs in its purest form; that is, where athletes get evaluated by athletic performance only and not by their gender, and where it becomes impossible to discriminate athletes based on their body constitution and gender identity. The gender constructions (...)
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  • The Concept of Advantage in Sport.Mika Hämäläinen - 2012 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 6 (3):308-322.
    The aim of this paper is to analyse the concept of advantage in sport. Advantage is often referred to in discussions of the philosophy of sport, but only a few analyses of the term exist. Sigmund Loland has discussed advantage most comprehensibly. Nevertheless, his view does not address all of the relevant kinds of advantage. I begin with a summary of Loland's view and then show its limitations. I continue by developing his ideas further to present what I call performance (...)
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  • A Sport with Untapped Potential to Empower Women.Mika Hämäläinen - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (1):53-63.
    This paper argues that the sport of ski jumping possesses the untapped potential to empower women. It also recommends ways in which this potential should be realised. The untapped potential of ski jumping lies in the notion that, under two independent conditions, women are able to jump as far as men. The first condition is that women start from a higher gate than men. The second is that women and men start from the same gate, but compete on a ski (...)
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  • A Soft Gynocentric Critique of the Practice of Modern Sport.Lisa Edwards & Carwyn Jones - 2007 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (3):346 – 366.
    In this article we propose a philosophical critique of two general, but not exhaustive, approaches to gender studies in sport, namely gynocentric feminism and humanist feminism. We argue that both approaches are problematic because they fail clearly to distinguish or articulate their epistemological and ideological commitments. In particular, humanist feminists articulate the human condition using the sex/gender dichotomy, which fails to account adequately for gendered subjectivity. For them gender difference is a contingent feature of humanity developed through socialisation. As a (...)
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  • Genetic Enhancement in the Dark.Leon Culbertson - 2009 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 36 (2):140-151.
  • Transsexuals in Sport–Fairness and Freedom, Regulation and Law.John Coggon, Natasha Hammond & S.⊘ren Holm - 2008 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 2 (1):4-17.
    The question of if, and under what conditions transsexuals should be allowed to participate in sports in their acquired sex is becoming increasingly relevant partly because the number of transsexuals is increasing partly because many countries now provide mechanisms for achieving legal recognition as belonging to the new acquired sex. This paper develops (1) an analysis of the justification for maintaining sex segregation in some sports and (2) an account of the rights of transsexuals to be recognised in their new (...)
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  • A Feminist Reconstruction of Liberal Rights and Sport.Michael Burke - unknown
    The purpose of this paper is to expand the usefulness of equal opportunities legislation for females in sport by providing a philosophically based opposition toward the long history of gender stereotypes, embodied in the AEC, that currently limit its effects.
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  • Philosophy of Sport in the Nordic Countries.Gunnar Breivik - 2010 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 37 (2):194-214.
    In 1972 I attended the Pre-Olympic Scientific Congress in Munich. For the first time science and sport were brought together in connection with the Olympic Games. The organizers presented a book Sport in Blickpunkt der Wissenschaften (Sport from a Scientific Point of View) that summarized history and state of the art of the main sport scientific approaches (41). The German philosopher Hans Lenk gave a presentation of a broad array of past and present interpretations of sport from a philosophic viewpoint (...)
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