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  1. Suffering.Bert Gordijn & Henk ten Have - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (3):333-334.
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  • Phenomenologically-Informed Cancer Care: An Entryway into the Art of Medicine.Casey Rentmeester, Mark Bake & Amy Riemer - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 2022:1-11.
    There has been increased interest in what the philosophical subdiscipline of phenomenology can contribute to medical humanities due to its dual emphases on practicality and its attempt to understand the experience of others, thus positioning it as a potentially helpful conceptual toolkit to guide clinical care. Using various figures from the phenomenological tradition, most prominently Martin Heidegger and Martin Buber, the authors illuminate relevant philosophical concepts, employ them in various examples, and provide three principles revolving around empathy, communication, and listening (...)
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  • Pain Versus Suffering: A Distinction Currently Without a Difference.Charlotte Mary Duffee - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (3):175-178.
    My paper challenges an influential distinction between pain and suffering put forward by physician-ethicist, Eric Cassell. I argue that Cassell’s distinction is philosophically untenable because he contrasts suffering with an outdated theory of pain. In particular, Cassell focuses on one type of pain, the interpretation of nociception induced by noxious stimuli such as heat or sharp objects; yet since the late 1970s, pain scientists have rendered both nociception and noxious stimuli unnecessary for pain. I argue that this discrepancy between Cassell’s (...)
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