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  1. Reflections on Darwin Historiography.Janet Browne - 2022 - Journal of the History of Biology 55 (2):381-393.
    Much has happened in the Darwin field since the Correspondence began publishing in 1985. This overview of historiography suggests that the richness of the letters generates fresh scholarly questions and that Darwin, paradoxically, is becoming progressively deconstructed as a key figure in the history of science.
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  • Darwin and Christianity: Truth and Myth.John Hedley Brooke - 2018 - Zygon 53 (3):836-849.
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  • The ‘Annie Hypothesis': Did the Death of His Daughter Cause Darwin to ‘Give Up Christianity’?John Van Wyhe & Mark J. Pallen - 2012 - Centaurus 54 (2):105-123.
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  • The Specimen Dealer: Entrepreneurial Natural History in America's Gilded Age. [REVIEW]Mark V. Barrow - 2000 - Journal of the History of Biology 33 (3):493 - 534.
    The post-Civil War American natural history craze spawned a new institution -- the natural history dealer -- that has failed to receive the historical attention it deserves. The individuals who created these enterprises simultaneously helped to promote and hoped to profit from the burgeoning interest in both scientific and popular specimen collecting. At a time when other employment and educational prospects in natural history were severely limited, hundreds of dealers across the nation provided encouragement, specimens, publication outlets, training opportunities, and (...)
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  • How Did Darwin Arrive at His Theory? The Secondary Literature to 1982.David R. Oldroyd - 1984 - History of Science 22 (4):325-374.
  • Darwinian Struggles: But is There Progress?Michael Ruse - 2009 - History of Science 47 (4):407-430.
  • “My Appointment Received the Sanction of the Admiralty”: Why Charles Darwin Really Was the Naturalist on HMS Beagle.John van Wyhe - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (3):316-326.
    For decades historians of science and science writers in general have maintained that Charles Darwin was not the ‘naturalist’ or ‘official naturalist’ during the 1831–1836 surveying voyage of HMS Beagle but instead Captain Robert FitzRoy’s ‘companion’, ‘gentleman companion’ or ‘dining companion’. That is, Darwin was primarily the captain’s social companion and only secondarily and unofficially naturalist. Instead, it is usually maintained, the ship’s surgeon Robert McCormick was the official naturalist because this was the default or official practice at the time. (...)
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  • Serendipity and Vision: Two Methods for Discovery Comments on Nickles.Scott A. Kleiner - 1999 - Biology and Philosophy 14 (1):55-63.
    Thomas Nickles challenges my thesis that innovative discoveries can be based on deliberately chosen problems and research strategies. He suggests that all significant innovation can be seen as such only in retrospect and that its generation must be serendipitous. Here I argue in response that significant innovations can and do often arise from self conscious critical appraisal of orthodox practice combined with regulated though speculative abductive argumentation to alternative explanatory schemata. Orthodox practice is not based upon monolithic systems of belief (...)
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  • Essay Review: The Darwin Industry. [REVIEW]Timothy Lenoir - 1987 - Journal of the History of Biology 20 (1):115-130.
  • Natural Selection Before the Origin: Public Reactions of Some Naturalists to the Darwin-Wallace Papers (Thomas Boyd, Arthur Hussey, and Henry Baker Tristram). [REVIEW]Richard England - 1997 - Journal of the History of Biology 30 (2):267 - 290.
  • The Metaphor and the Rock.Frank J. Sulloway - unknown
    ve r since the appearance of Ontogeny and Phylogeny a decade ago, Stephen Jay Gould has continued to delight and inform a wide spectrum of readers and, in doing so, to defy C.P. Snow's lament about the "two cultures" of the sciences and the humanities. Gould's monthly column in Natural History magazine, published under the heading "This View of Life," has led to a series of highly praised volumes of essays—Ever Since Darwin (1977), The Panda's Thumb (1980), Hen's Teeth and (...)
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  • A Origem Dos Pombos Domésticos Na Estratégia Argumentativa de Darwin.Roberto de Andrade Martins - 2012 - Filosofia E Hist’Oria da Biologia 7 (1):91-116.
    In the first chapter of the Origin of species and in two chapters of the Variation of animals and plants under domestication, Darwin discusses the origin of domestic pigeons, claiming that all the known breeds were produced from a single species: Columba livia, the rock pigeon. The detailed defense of this point is of high relevance in Darwin’s argumentation strategy, since the differences between the several domestic breeds is so large that, if they were found in the wild, they could (...)
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  • Divergence and Gene Flow Among Darwin's Finches: A Genome-Wide View of Adaptive Radiation Driven by Interspecies Allele Sharing.Daniela H. Palmer & Marcus R. Kronforst - 2015 - Bioessays 37 (9):968-974.
  • Darwin’s Conversion: The Beagle Voyage and its Aftermath.Frank J. Sulloway - 1982 - Journal of the History of Biology 15 (3):325-396.
  • “A Great Complication of Circumstances” – Darwin and the Economy of Nature.Trevor Pearce - 2010 - Journal of the History of Biology 43 (3):493-528.
    In 1749, Linnaeus presided over the dissertation "Oeconomia Naturae," which argued that each creature plays an important and particular role in nature 's economy. This phrase should be familiar to readers of Darwin, for he claims in the Origin that "all organic beings are striving, it may be said, to seize on each place in the economy of nature." Many scholars have discussed the influence of political economy on Darwin's ideas. In this paper, I take a different tack, showing that (...)
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  • Darwin as a Young Scientist.Phillip R. Sloan - 1987 - Biology and Philosophy 2 (1):93-106.
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  • Darwin: The Theory Years. [REVIEW]Phillip R. Sloan - 1991 - Biology and Philosophy 6 (1):107-114.
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  • Darwin's Principles of Divergence and Natural Selection: Why Fodor Was Almost Right.Robert J. Richards - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 43 (1):256-268.
    In a series of articles and in a recent book, What Darwin Got Wrong, Jerry Fodor has objected to Darwin’s principle of natural selection on the grounds that it assumes nature has intentions.1 Despite the near universal rejection of Fodor’s argument by biologists and philosophers of biology (myself included),2 I now believe he was almost right. I will show this through a historical examination of a principle that Darwin thought as important as natural selection, his principle of divergence. The principle (...)
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  • “My Appointment Received the Sanction of the Admiralty”: Why Charles Darwin Really Was the Naturalist on HMS Beagle.John van Wyhe - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (3):316-326.
    For decades historians of science and science writers in general have maintained that Charles Darwin was not the ‘naturalist’ or ‘official naturalist’ during the 1831–1836 surveying voyage of HMS Beagle but instead Captain Robert FitzRoy’s ‘companion’, ‘gentleman companion’ or ‘dining companion’. That is, Darwin was primarily the captain’s social companion and only secondarily and unofficially naturalist. Instead, it is usually maintained, the ship’s surgeon Robert McCormick was the official naturalist because this was the default or official practice at the time. (...)
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  • Darwin’s Principles of Divergence and Natural Selection: Why Fodor Was Almost Right.Robert J. Richards - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 43 (1):256-268.
  • An Amphibious Being: How Maritime Surveying Reshaped Darwin’s Approach to Natural History.Alistair Sponsel - 2016 - Isis 107 (2):254-281.
  • Essay Review: The Correspondence of the Young Darwin.Silvan S. Schweber - 1988 - Journal of the History of Biology 21 (3):501-519.
  • Tantalizing Tortoises and the Darwin-Galápagos Legend.Frank J. Sulloway - 2009 - Journal of the History of Biology 42 (1):3 - 31.
    During his historic Galápagos visit in 1835, Darwin spent nine days making scientific observations and collecting specimens on Santiago (James Island). In the course of this visit, Darwin ascended twice to the Santiago highlands. There, near springs located close to the island's summit, he conducted his most detailed observations of Galapagos tortoises. The precise location of these springs, which has not previously been established, is here identified using Darwin's own writings, satellite maps, and GPS technology. Photographic evidence from excursions to (...)
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