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  1. Conditions for ‘Upbuilding’: A Reply to Nigel Tubbs’ Reading of Kierkegaard.Stein M. Wivestad - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (4):613-625.
    A Special Issue of the Journal of Philosophy of Education, 2005, issue 2, contains an interesting ‘Philosophy of the Teacher’ by Nigel Tubbs. It rejects attempts in pedagogical traditions to ignore or avoid the contradiction between the teacher as master and as servant, and ends with an interpretation of ‘upbuilding’, a central concept in Søren Kierkegaard's writings. According to Tubbs’ reading, the teacher's patient struggle with herself in doubt is the basic condition for upbuilding, whereby the eternal's perfect gift of (...)
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  • Kierkegaard on Imitation and Ethics: Towards a Secular Project?Wojciech T. Kaftanski - 2020 - Journal of Religious Ethics 48 (4):557-577.
    This essay demonstrates the prominence of imitation in Kierkegaard’s ethics. I move beyond his idea of authentic existence modeled on Christ and explore the secular dimension of Kierkegaard’s insights about human nature and imitation. I start with presenting imitation as key to understanding the ethical dimension of the relationship between the universal and individual aspects of the human self in Kierkegaard. I then show that Kierkegaard’s moral concepts of “primitivity” and “comparison” are a response to his sociological and psychological observations (...)
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  • “That is Giving a Banquet”: Neighbor‐Love as Spiritualization of Romantic Loves in Works of Love.Jeffrey Hanson - forthcoming - Journal of Religious Ethics.
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  • Ongoing: On Grief’s Open-Ended Rehearsal.Line Ryberg Ingerslev - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (3):343-360.
    Peter Goldie’s account of grief as a narrative process that unfolds over time allow us to address the structure of self-understanding in the experience of loss. Taking up the Goldie’s idea that narrativity plays a crucial role in grief, I will argue that the experience of desynchronization and an altered relation to language disrupt even of our ability to compose narratives and to think narratively. Further, I will argue that Goldie’s account of grief as a narratively structured process focus on (...)
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  • The Readiness Is All.Brayton Polka - 2021 - The European Legacy 27 (5):500-505.
    The prolific philosopher Mark C. Taylor, in his book, Abiding Grace, appears to be bringing his distinguished career to an end. The final chapter of his book is entitled “Ending Ending.” Taylor int...
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  • Hope.Claudia Bloeser & Titus Stahl - 2017 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  • Poetry and Ethics: Inventing Possibilities in Which We Are Moved to Action and How We Live Together.Obiora Ike, Andrea Grieder & Ignace Haaz (eds.) - 2018 - Geneva, Switzerland: Globethics Publications.
    This book on the topic of ethics and poetry consists of contributions from different continents on the subject of applied ethics related to poetry. It should gather a favourable reception from philosophers, ethicists, theologians and anthropologists from Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America and allows for a comparison of the healing power of words from various religious, spiritual and philosophical traditions. The first part of this book presents original poems that express ethical emotions and aphorism related to a philosophical questioning (...)
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  • Could a Divine-Command Theory of Moral Obligations Justify Horrible Acts? Some Kierkegaardian Reflections.C. Stephen Evans - 2022 - The Monist 105 (3):388-407.
    This paper considers whether a divine-command theory of moral obligation could justify morally horrible acts, partly by examining Kierkegaard’s writings. It argues that only the commands of a God who is essentially good could be morally justified, and thus no defensible version of a DCT could actually justify horrible acts. In Works of Love Kierkegaard defends such a DCT, and thus is committed to the claim that any actual commands of God must be aimed at the good. This is consistent (...)
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  • Kierkegaard on Authority, Obedience, and the Modern Approach to Religion.David Diener - 2013 - Res Philosophica 90 (4):609-628.
    Throughout his works Kierkegaard repeatedly claims that the modern age has subverted authentic Christianity. While interpretations of Kierkegaard’s critique of the modern approach to religion abound, they generally agree that the critique is based on various conceptual distinctions regarding the limits of human reason, the epistemological differences between subjective and objective truth, or the nature of religious faith. Very little attention, however, has been paid to the prominent role authority plays in the critique or to the fact that according to (...)
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  • Being Exposed to Love: The Death of God in Jean-Luc Marion and Jean-Luc Nancy.Ashok Collins - 2016 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 80 (3):297-319.
    In this article I explore how a philosophical conception of love may be used to draw debate on the death of God beyond the binary opposition between theology and philosophy through a comparative study of the work of Jean-Luc Marion and Jean-Luc Nancy. Although Marion’s reading of love—in both its theological and phenomenological guises—proposes an innovative phrasing of a non-metaphysical notion of divinity, I argue that it is ultimately unable to maintain its coherence in nominal discourse due to Marion’s insistence (...)
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  • Kierkegaard's Mirror.Elivahu Rosenow - 1990 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 22 (1):8–15.
  • Must Dewey and Kierkegaard's Inquiry for World Peace Be Violent?R. Scott Webster - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):521-533.
    Amongst the many aims of education, surely the pursuit of global peace must be one of the most significant. The mandate of UNESCO is to pursue world peace through education by primarily promoting collaboration. The sort of collaboration that UNESCO endorses involves democratic dialogue, where various persons from differing backgrounds can come together, listen, negotiate and discuss possible ways in which peace might be pursued. While this sort of democratic dialogue with its associated free intellectual inquiry is more readily acceptable (...)
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  • Kierkegaard and the Feminine Self.Leslie A. Howe - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (4):131-157.
    Kierkegaard shows two contrary attitudes to woman and the feminine: misogyny and celebration. The Kierkegaardian structure of selfhood, because combined with a hierarchical assumption about the relative value of certain human characteristics, and their identification as male or female, argues that woman is a lesser self. Consequently, the claim that the Kierkegaardian ideal of selfhood is androgynist is rejected, though it is the latter assumptions alone that force this conclusion.
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  • Doing All Things for God's Glory, Acting so That It is God Who Acts: Kierkegaard, Edwards, and the Problem of Total Devotion.Daniel M. Johnson - 2022 - Religious Studies 58 (1):197-216.
    This article accomplishes two things. First, it explores and defends Kierkegaard's distinctive solution to the Problem of Total Devotion, a problem which has been helpfully identified by Robert Adams. Second, it extends that solution by advancing an interpretation of the command to do all things to the glory of God according to which we are being commanded to intentionally make every one of our actions such that it simultaneously counts as a divine action: in other words, to act intentionally in (...)
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  • The Moral Argument for the Existence of God and Immortality.Roe Fremstedal - 2013 - Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (1):50-78.
    This essay tries to show that there exist several passages where Kierkegaard (and his pseudonyms) sketches an argument for the existence of God and immortality that is remarkably similar to Kant's so-called moral argument for the existence of God and immortality. In particular, Kierkegaard appears to follow Kant's moral argument both when it comes to the form and content of the argument as well as some of its terminology. The essay concludes that several passages in Kierkegaard overlap significantly with Kant's (...)
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  • Wolterstorff on Love and Justice. [REVIEW]Joseph Clair - 2013 - Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (1):138-167.
    In Justice in Love, Nicholas Wolterstorff argues for a unique ethical orientation called “care-agapism.” He offers it as an alternative to theories of benevolence-agapism found in Christian ethics on the one hand and to the philosophical orientations of egoism, utilitarianism, and eudaimonism on the other. The purported uniqueness and superiority of his theory lies in its ability to account for the conceptual compatibility of love and justice while also positively incorporating self-love. Yet in attempting to articulate a “bestowed worth” account (...)
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  • The Paralyzing Instant.Jonathan Malesic - 2013 - Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (2):209-232.
    Kierkegaard in Fear and Trembling presents a reductio ad absurdum regarding the time-spans subject to moral evaluation. The text's classic dilemma depends on assuming that we only evaluate discrete, contextless instants. The pseudonymous author constantly seeks the single instant or moral “photograph” that indicates Abraham's status. Doing so, however, extracts scripture's moral legislation out from narrative, resulting in theological paralysis and thereby requiring an alternative temporal vocabulary for evaluating Abraham. Fear and Trembling contains an under-explored alternative that sets Abraham within (...)
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  • The Price of Charity: Christian Love and Financial Anxieties.Sean Capener - 2018 - Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (2):217-238.
    Love and money, according to the intuitive logic of Christian political theology, stand in opposition to each other. Where economic relations obtain, relations of love are understood to be absent or distorted. The opposition between the two has led social theorists and political theologians—including John Milbank, Kathryn Tanner, and Daniel M. Bell—to understand Christian love as a reservoir of opposition to the politics of contemporary financialized capital. This opposition, however, ignores the complex interrelationship that has characterized Christian thought about love (...)
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  • Can Isaac Forgive Abraham?Mitchell J. Gauvin - 2017 - Journal of Religious Ethics 45 (1):83-103.
    Forgiveness is an expression that befits agents who are at heart morally frail and imperfect. There is strong disagreement regarding its structure, conditions, and permissibility. Søren Kierkegaard's pseudonymously authored Fear and Trembling—already well understood as a challenge to our understanding of faith, religion, and the moral law through its focus on the biblical tale of Abraham's binding of Isaac—offers an indirect challenge to our understanding of forgiveness. Isaac is too often overlooked as characterless and philosophically uninteresting. What such a reading (...)
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  • Søren Kierkegaard and the Impossibility of (Un)Forgiveness.G. P. Marcar - 2019 - Journal of Religious Ethics 47 (4):716-734.
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  • Expressions of Preference and Other Morally Problematic Instances of Prayer.Bertha Alvarez Manninen - 2019 - Journal of Religious Ethics 47 (4):679-695.
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  • Contempt and the Cultivation of Character.Ryan West - 2015 - Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (3):493-519.
    Macalester Bell urges the cultivation of apt contempt as the best response to what she calls “the vices of superiority”. In this essay, I sketch two character profiles. The first—the ideal contemnor—paradigmatically answers the vices of superiority with contempt. The second—the ideal Christian neighbor—is marked by humility and love, and answers the vices of superiority in non-contemptuous ways. I argue that the latter character rivals the former as a fitting moral response to the vices of superiority. Furthermore, I argue that (...)
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  • The Diremption of Love: Gillian Rose on Agency, Mortality, and Hegelian Feminism.Asaf Angermann - 2019 - Hypatia 34 (2):309-328.
    Gillian Rose was an influential though idiosyncratic British philosopher whose work helped introduce the Frankfurt School's critical theory and renew interest in Hegel, Kierkegaard, and Jewish thought in Anglo‐American philosophy. After years of relative oblivion, her life and thought have recently received new attention in philosophy, sociology, and theology. However, her work's critical Hegelian contribution to feminist philosophy still remains unexplored. This article seeks to reassess the place and the meaning of feminism and gender identity in Rose's work by addressing (...)
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  • A Moral Problem for Difficult Art.Antony Aumann - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (4):383-396.
    Works of art can be difficult in several ways. One important way is by making us face up to unsettling truths. Such works typically receive praise. I maintain, however, that sometimes they deserve moral censure. The crux of my argument is that, just as we have a right to know the truth in certain contexts, so too we have a right not to know it. Provided our ignorance does not harm or seriously endanger others, the decision about whether to know (...)
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  • Role Modeling in an Early Confucian Context.Cheryl Cottine - 2016 - Journal of Value Inquiry 50 (4):797-819.
  • The Moment of Self-Transformation: Kierkegaard on Suffering and the Subject.Samuel Cuff Snow - 2016 - Continental Philosophy Review 49 (2):161-180.
    In his self-published periodical The Moment, Søren Kierkegaard warns his reader against the possibility of “useless suffering”. Not only that, he urges the reader to make use of her suffering. Taking this caution as a point of departure, I investigate the pseudonymous Johannes Climacus’ deliberations on ethico-religious suffering in the Postscript. I demonstrate that Climacus construes suffering as useful, and with that outlines an economy of suffering that Kierkegaard delineates across his pseudonymous and non-pseudonymous work. The paradigmatic expression of this (...)
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  • Deletion as Second Death: The Moral Status of Digital Remains.Patrick Stokes - 2015 - Ethics and Information Technology 17 (4):237-248.
    There has been increasing attention in sociology and internet studies to the topic of ‘digital remains’: the artefacts users of social network services and other online services leave behind when they die. But these artefacts also pose philosophical questions regarding what impact, if any, these artefacts have on the ontological and ethical status of the dead. One increasingly pertinent question concerns whether these artefacts should be preserved, and whether deletion counts as a harm to the deceased user and therefore provides (...)
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  • The Binding of Abraham: Levinas’s Moment in Kierkegaard’s Fear and Trembling.Robert Reed - 2017 - Sophia 56 (1):81-98.
    Most readings of Kierkegaard’s Fear and Trembling take its account of the Abraham and Isaac story to imply fairly obviously that duty towards God is absolutely distinct from, and therefore capable of superseding, duty towards neighbor or son. This paper will argue, however, that the Akedah, or ‘binding’ of Isaac, as Kierkegaard’s pseudonym, Johannes de Silentio, depicts it, binds Abraham to Isaac in a revitalized neighbor relation that is not at all subordinate, in any simple way, to Abraham’s God-relation. The (...)
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  • True Self-Love and True Self-Sacrifice.John Lippitt - 2009 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 66 (3):125-138.
    In recent commentary on Kierkegaard’s Works of Love, a distinction is commonly drawn between ‘proper’ and ‘selfish’ forms of self- love. In arguing that not all vices of self-focus can be captured under the heading of selfishness, I seek to distinguish selfishness from self-centredness. But the latter vice has a far more handsome cousin: proper self-focus of the kind necessary for ‘becoming a self’. As various feminist thinkers have argued, this will be missed if we valorise self-sacrifice too uncritically. But (...)
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  • On Becoming Better Human Beings: Six Stories to Live By.Stein M. Wivestad - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (1):55-71.
    What are the conditions required for becoming better human beings? What are our limitations and possibilities? I understand “becoming better” as a combined improvement process bringing persons “up from” a negative condition and “up to” a positive one. Today there is a tendency to understand improvement in a one-sided way as a movement up to the mastery of cognitive skills, neglecting the negative conditions that can make these skills mis-educative. I therefore tell six stories in the Western tradition about conditions (...)
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  • ‘A Glorious Sun and a Bad Person’. Wittgenstein, Ethical Reflection and the Other.Anne-Marie Søndergaard Christensen - 2011 - Philosophia 39 (2):207-223.
    Most commentators working on Wittgenstein’s remarks on ethics note that he rejects the very possibility of traditional normative ethics, that is, a philosophically justified normative guide for right conduct. In this article, Wittgenstein’s view of ethical reflection as presented in his notebooks from 1936 to 1938 is investigated, and the question of whether it involves ethical guidance is addressed. In Wittgenstein’s remarks, we can identify three requirements inherent in ethical reflection. The first two is revealed in the realisation that ethical (...)
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  • ‘Ethics of Ethics, Law of Laws’: Kierkegaard, Lévinas and the Aporia of Substantive Identity.Robyn Brothers - 1999 - Sophia 38 (2):54-68.
  • How a Modest Fideism May Constrain Theistic Commitments: Exploring an Alternative to Classical Theism.John Bishop - 2007 - Philosophia 35 (3-4):387-402.
    On the assumption that theistic religious commitment takes place in the face of evidential ambiguity, the question arises under what conditions it is permissible to make a doxastic venture beyond one’s evidence in favour of a religious proposition. In this paper I explore the implications for orthodox theistic commitment of adopting, in answer to that question, a modest, moral coherentist, fideism. This extended Jamesian fideism crucially requires positive ethical evaluation of both the motivation and content of religious doxastic ventures. I (...)
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  • Patrick Sheil: Kierkegaard and Levinas: The Subjunctive Mood: Ashgate, Surrey, England, 2010, Xviii + 288 Pp. [REVIEW]Adam Buben - 2011 - Human Studies 34 (4):475-480.
  • Can God Forgive Our Trespasses?N. Verbin - 2013 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 74 (2):181-199.
    Believers regularly refer to God as “forgiving and merciful” when praying for divine forgiveness. If one is committed to divine immutability and impassability, as Maimonides is, one must deny that God is capable, in principle, of acting in a forgiving manner. If one rejects divine impassability, maintaining that God has a psychology, as Muffs does, one must reckon with biblical depictions of divine vengeance and rage. Such depictions suggest that while being capable, in principle, of acting in a forgiving way, (...)
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  • “Upbuilding Examples” for Adults Close to Children.Stein M. Wivestad - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (5):515-532.
    Both in formal situations and in many, often unpredictable informal situations —adults come close to children. Whether we intend it or not, we continually give them examples of what it is to live as a human being, and thereby we have a pedagogical responsibility. I sketch what it could mean to let ourselves “be built up”, in a Kierkegaardian sense, on the foundation of unconditional love, presupposing that this love is possible for all human beings. Kierkegaard’s Upbuilding discourses invite each (...)
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  • In Defence of a Faith-Like Model of Love: A Reply to John Lippitt’s “Kierkegaard and the Problem of Special Relationships: Ferreira, Krishek, and the ‘God Filter”’.Sharon Krishek - 2014 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 75 (2):155-166.
    In his major work on love, Works of Love, Kierkegaard clearly and robustly affirms the moral superiority of neighbourly love, and approves preferential love on one condition: that it serve as an instance of neighbourly love. But can an essentially preferential love be an instance of the essentially non-preferential neighbourly love? John Lippitt seems to think it can. In his paper “Kierkegaard and the problem of special relationships: Ferreira, Krishek, and the ‘God filter”’ he defends Kierkegaard’s position in Works of (...)
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  • Irony, Deception, and Subjective Truth: Principles for Existential Teaching.Herner Saeverot - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (5):503-513.
    This paper takes the position that the aim of existential teaching, i.e., teaching where existential questions are addressed, consists in educating the students in light of subjective truth, where the students are ‘educated’ to exist on their own, i.e., independent of the teacher. The question is whether it is possible to educate in light of existence. It is, in fact impossible, as existence is a subjective matter, meaning that it must be determined individually. In this way the existential teaching appears (...)
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  • Phenomenology of Interior Life and the Trinity.Robert Farrugia - 2020 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 25 (1):71-88.
    Michel Henry radicalises phenomenology by putting forward the idea of a double manifestation: the “Truth of Life” and “truth of the world.” For Henry, the world turns out to be empty of Life. To find its essence, the self must dive completely inward, away from the exterior movements of intentionality. Hence, Life, or God, for Henry, lies in non-intentional, immanent self-experience, which is felt and yet remains invisible, in an absolutist sense, as an a priori condition of all conscious experience. (...)
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  • Truth and Metaphor: Interpretation as Philosophical and Literary Practice.Brayton Polka - 1988 - Diogenes 36 (143):111-128.
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  • A Hermeneutic for and From Reading Kierkegaard's For Self-Examination.Nathan Eric Dickman - 2020 - Religions 10 (11):491.
    This essay provides a close reading of Kierkegaard’s later signed text, For Self-Examination. While many of Kierkegaard’s pseudonymous texts often are selected for their philosophically explicit engagements with Hegelian philosophy, I use Hegel’s dialectic of lordship and bondage to draw out how Kierkegaard circumvents it in this one. I first provide historical context, noting how Kierkegaard turned to earnest works after his public humiliation in the Copenhagen newspaper, undermining his ability to deploy irony effectively. Second, I briefly develop Hegel’s lordship (...)
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  • A Human Being’s Highest Perfection.Pieter H. Vos - 2016 - Faith and Philosophy 33 (3):311-332.
    Focusing on the grammar and vocabulary of virtue in Kierkegaard’s upbuilding works, it is argued that the Danish philosopher represents a Christian conception of the moral life that is distinct from but—contrary to Alasdair MacIntyre’s claim—not completely opposed to Aristotelian and Thomistic virtue ethics. Although the realities of sin and salvation transcend virtue ethics based purely on human nature, it is demonstrated that this does not prevent Kierkegaard from speaking constructively about human nature, its teleology and about the virtues. Yet, (...)
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  • Is Kierkegaard a “Virtue Ethicist”?Robert C. Roberts - 2019 - Faith and Philosophy 36 (3):325-342.
    Several readers of Kierkegaard have proposed that his works are a good source for contemporary investigations of virtues, especially theistic and Christian ones. Sylvia Walsh has recently offered several arguments to cast doubt on the thesis that Kierkegaard can be profitably read as a “virtue ethicist.” Examination of her arguments helps to clarify what virtues, as excellent traits of human character, can be in a moral outlook that ascribes deep sin and moral helplessness to human beings and their existence and (...)
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  • On Climacus’s “Against Reason” Thesis.Eleanor Helms - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (4):471-488.
    I object to Merold Westphal’s characterization in Kierkegaard’s Concept of Faith of faith as “against reason.” I argue that Kierkegaard scholars emphasize the tension between faith and reason more than Kierkegaard does, affirming and perpetuating a broader antagonism in our own cultural climate. I suggest that the view of faith as “transforming vision” developed by M. Jamie Ferreira and others makes better sense of the different facets of faith pointed out by Westphal and the strengths of his account while avoiding (...)
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  • Knowing Emotions: Replies to de Sousa, Beisecker, and Gallegos.Rick A. Furtak - 2019 - Journal of Philosophy of Emotion 1 (1):135-145.
    Beginning with de Sousa's question about how my position is related to that of "enactive" theorists, I spell out my emphasis on the unity of affective experience, and say more about my conception of the emotional "a priori." In response to Beisecker, I elaborate by way of a literary example on how a significant fact can exist without yet having 'registered' in one's emotional awareness, and on the basis of this I reject the claim that emotions constitute significance. Finally, prompted (...)
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  • Forgiveness and the Multiple Functions of Anger.Antony G. Aumann & Zac Cogley - 2019 - Journal of Philosophy of Emotion 1 (1):44-71.
    This paper defends an account of forgiveness that is sensitive to recent work on anger. Like others, we claim anger involves an appraisal, namely that someone has done something wrong. But, we add, anger has two further functions. First, anger communicates to the wrongdoer that her act has been appraised as wrong and demands she feel guilty. This function enables us to explain why apologies make it reasonable to forgo anger and forgive. Second, anger sanctions the wrongdoer for what she (...)
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  • The Coherence of Love.Alan Soble - 2000 - Philosophy and Theology 12 (2):293-315.
    I examine three common beliefs about love: constancy, exclusivity, and the claim that love is a response to the properties of the beloved. Following a discussion of their relative consistency, I argue that neither the constancy nor the exclusivity of love are saved by the contrary belief, that love is not (entirely) a response to the properties of the beloved.
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  • The Fullness of Time: Kierkegaardian Themes in Dreyer's Ordet.Daniel Watts - 2019 - Religions 10 (1).
    I offer an approach to Dreyer's film Ordet as a contribution to the phenomenology of a certain kind of religious experience. The experience in question is one of a moment that disrupts the chronological flow of time and that, in the lived experience of it, is charged with eternal significance. I propose that the notoriously divisive ending of Ordet reflects an aim to provide the film's viewers with an experience of this very sort. l draw throughout on some central ideas (...)
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  • Biopolitics & Probability: Agamben & Kierkegaard.Virgil W. Brower - 2021 - In Marcos Antonio Norris & Colby Dickinson (eds.), Agamben and the Existentialists. Edinburgh, UK: Edinburgh University Press. pp. 46-64.
    This project retraces activations of Kierkegaard in the development of polit­ical theology. It suggests alternative modes of states of exception than those attributed to him by Schmitt, Taubes and Agamben. Several Kierkegaardian themes open themselves to 'something like pure potential' in Agamben, namely: living death, animality, criminality, auto-constitution, modification, liturgy, love and certain articulations of improbabilities. Attention is drawn to a modal ontology and auto-constitution at work in Kierkegaard's writings, as well as a complicated and indissociable operation between killing and (...)
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  • Can Ethical Organizational Character Be Stimulated and Enabled?: “Upbuilding” Dialog as Crisis Management Method. [REVIEW]Richard P. Nielsen & Ron Dufresne - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 57 (4):311 - 326.
    Crisis management can be simultaneously a content specific problem solving process and an opportunity for stimulating and enabling an organizations ethical tradition. Crisis can be an opportunity for ethical organizational development. Kierkegaardian upbuilding dialog method builds from within the internal ethical tradition of an organization to respond to crises while simultaneously adapting and protecting the organizations tradition. The crisis itself may not be a directly ethical crisis, but the method of responding to the crisis is built upon the ethical foundations (...)
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