Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Miracles.Timothy McGrew - 2011 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Miracles.Michael Levine - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Tractatus practico-theoreticus.Nythamar De Oliveira - 2016 - Porto Alegre, Brazil: Editora Fi.
    No categories
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Ultimate Force of the Law: On the Essence and Precariousness of the Monopoly on Legitimate Force.Ralf Poscher - 2016 - Ratio Juris 29 (3):311-322.
    In his new book, Fred Schauer adopts a prototypical approach to the law in order to reestablish the importance of “The Force of Law”, and I strongly support his claim that there are interesting things to be said about the relationship between law and force. One aspect concerns the special kind of force to which the law is related. In the tradition of political philosophy, this kind of force has often been characterized with the state's monopoly on legitimate force. Whereas (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Universality of Jewish Ethics: A Rejoinder to Secularist Critics.David Novak - 2008 - Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (2):181-211.
    Jewish ethics like Judaism itself has often been charged with being "particularistic," and in modernity it has been unfavorably compared with the universality of secular ethics. This charge has become acute philosophically when the comparison is made with the ethics of Kant. However, at this level, much of the ethical rejection of Jewish particularism, especially its being beholden to a God who is above the universe to whom this God prescribes moral norms and judges according to them, is also a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Beyond the Janus Face of Zionist Legalism: The Theo-Political Conditions of the Jewish Law Project.Joseph E. David - 2005 - Ratio Juris 18 (2):206-235.
    . What are the assumptions that underline the Jewish Law Project? To what extent is this project relates to Zionism as a political program and national vision? Does the secular version of this project and the religious one have anything in common? I argue that aside from the ideological lines that guide the Jewish Law Project, within it rests a reductionist and utopianist stance vis‐à‐vis halakhah which are considered to be obvious. I shall attempt to claim that reductionism and utopianism (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Spinoza's Theory of Teaching and Indoctrination.Tapio Puolimatka - 2001 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 33 (3-4):397-410.
  • Was Spinoza a Naturalist?Alexander Douglas - 2015 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 96 (1):77-99.
    In this article I dispute the claim, made by several contemporary scholars, that Spinoza was a naturalist. ‘Naturalism’ here refers to two distinct but related positions in contemporary philosophy. The first, ontological naturalism, is the view that everything that exists possesses a certain character permitting it to be defined as natural and prohibiting it from being defined as supernatural. I argue that the only definition of ontological naturalism that could be legitimately applied to Spinoza's philosophy is so unrestrictive as to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Exorcizing Demons: Thomas Hobbes and Balthasar Bekker on Spirits and Religion.Alissa MacMillan - 2014 - Philosophica 89.
  • Introduction.Steffen Ducheyne & Wim Van Moer - 2014 - Philosophica 89.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Radical Enlightenment, Enlightened Subversion, and Spinoza.Sonja Lavaert - 2014 - Philosophica 89.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Scientific Freedom: Its Grounds and Their Limitations.Torsten Wilholt - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (2):174-181.
    In various debates about science, appeal is made to the freedom of scientific research. A rationale in favor of this freedom is rarely offered. In this paper, two major arguments are reconstructed that promise to lend support to a principle of scientific freedom. According to the epistemological argument, freedom of research is required in order to organize the collective cognitive effort we call science efficiently. According to the political argument, scientific knowledge needs to be generated in ways that are independent (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Could a Religious Ethics Ever Be Universal?Angela Roothaan - 2004 - Bijdragen 65 (2):209-225.
    In the correspondence between Baruch Spinoza and his former friends Nicolas Stensen and Albert Burgh we find an interesting discussion on the sense of committing oneself to a particular institutionalized religion. Burgh and Stensen, both being converts to Roman Catholicism, tried to convince the former Jew to make the same move as they did. Spinoza answers Burgh that he will not do so, and refers to his ‘universal religion’, which he developed in his published work, the Theological-Political Treatise. This modern (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • When Champions Meet: Rethinking the Bohr–Einstein Debate.Nicolaas P. Landsman - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 37 (1):212-242.
    Einstein's philosophy of physics (as clarified by Fine, Howard, and Held) was predicated on his Trennungsprinzip, a combination of separability and locality, without which he believed objectification, and thereby "physical thought" and "physical laws", to be impossible. Bohr's philosophy (as elucidated by Hooker, Scheibe, Folse, Howard, Held, and others), on the other hand, was grounded in a seemingly different doctrine about the possibility of objective knowledge, namely the necessity of classical concepts. In fact, it follows from Raggio's Theorem in algebraic (...)
    Direct download (16 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Wittgenstein's Ph.D Viva—a Re-Creation.Laurence Goldstein - 1999 - Philosophy 74 (4):499-513.
  • The Possibility of Contractual Slavery.Danny Frederick - 2016 - Philosophical Quarterly 66 (262):47-64.
    In contrast to eminent historical philosophers, almost all contemporary philosophers maintain that slavery is impermissible. In the enthusiasm of the Enlightenment, a number of arguments gained currency which were intended to show that contractual slavery is not merely impermissible but impossible. Those arguments are influential today in moral, legal and political philosophy, even in discussions that go beyond the issue of contractual slavery. I explain what slavery is, giving historical and other illustrations. I examine the arguments for the impossibility of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations