Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Corporate Temperance a Business Virtue.Richard C. Warren - 1994 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 3 (4):223-232.
    “There are strong temptations for those at the top of an organisational hierarchy to appropriate to themselves a disproportionate share of the resources of the organisation and to exercise too much power over the activities of other organisational members.” Hence the case for taking a cool look at executive remuneration and other possible breaches of applying the classical virtue of temperance to corporate behaviour. The author is Principal Lecturer in the Business Studies Department, Manchester Metropolitan University, Aytoun Building, Aytoun Street, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Corporate Profit, Entrepreneurship Theory and Business Ethics.Radu Vranceanu - 2014 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 23 (1):50-68.
    Economic profit is produced by entrepreneurs, those special individuals able to detect and seize as yet unexploited market opportunities. Many large capitalist firms manage to deliver positive profits even in the most competitive environments. They can do so, thanks to internal entrepreneurs, a subset of their employees able to drive change and develop innovation in the workplace. This paper argues that the goal of increasing economic profit is fully consistent with the corporation doing good for society. However, there is little (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Ethical Dimension of Economic Choices.Radu Vranceanu - 2005 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 14 (2):94-107.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Practising Applied Ethics with Philosophical Integrity: The Case of Business Ethics.Deon Rossouw - 2008 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 17 (2):161-170.
    The unprecedented growth and demand for Applied Ethics since the last quarter of the previous century, has opened up a range of new opportunities for the discipline of Philosophy. While these new opportunities have been enthusiastically seized upon by some philosophers, others have frowned upon them or rejected them outright. In order to make sense of this demand for Applied Ethics training, I will first explore in general why this demand for Applied Ethics developed. I will then use the example (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Beneath Good and Evil?Thomas Taro Lennerfors - 2013 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 22 (4):380-392.
    The aim of this paper is to think business ethics with the help of philosopher Alain Badiou, focusing on Badiou's critique of ethics and the concepts of ‘event’, ‘truth’ and especially ‘subject’. Based mainly on review articles, I construct an understanding of business ethics and its history as a field of research. With the help of a framework developed from Badiou's work on ethics, I conduct a metacritique of business ethics as being intolerant, nihilist, reactive and obscure. Opposed to these (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Discourse and Descriptive Business Ethics.Gjalt de Graaf - 2006 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 15 (3):246-258.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Ethical Stewardship – Implications for Leadership and Trust.Cam Caldwell, Linda A. Hayes, Patricia Bernal & Ranjan Karri - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 78 (1):153-164.
    Great leaders are ethical stewards who generate high levels of commitment from followers. In this paper, we propose that perceptions about the trustworthiness of leader behaviors enable those leaders to be perceived as ethical stewards. We define ethical stewardship as the honoring of duties owed to employees, stakeholders, and society in the pursuit of long-term wealth creation. Our model of relationship between leadership behaviors, perceptions of trustworthiness, and the nature of ethical stewardship reinforces the importance of ethical governance in dealing (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  • An Examination of the Relationship Between Ethical Work Climate and Moral Awareness.Craig V. VanSandt, Jon M. Shepard & Stephen M. Zappe - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 68 (4):409-432.
    This paper draws from the fields of history, sociology, psychology, moral philosophy, and organizational theory to establish a theoretical connection between a social/organizational influence (ethical work climate) and an individual cognitive element of moral behavior (moral awareness). The research was designed to help to fill a gap in the existing literature by providing empirical evidence of the connection between organizational influences and individual moral awareness and subsequent ethical choices, which has heretofore largely been merely assumed. Results of the study provide (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  • An Ethical Analysis of the Second Amendment: The Right to Pack Heat at Work.William M. Martin, Helen LaVan, Yvette P. Lopez, Charles E. Naquin & Marsha Katz - 2014 - Business and Society Review 119 (1):1-36.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Discourse and Descriptive Business Ethics.Gjalt de Graaf - 2006 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 15 (3):246–258.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Corporate Temperance a Business Virtue.Richard C. Warren - 1994 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 3 (4):223–232.
    “There are strong temptations for those at the top of an organisational hierarchy to appropriate to themselves a disproportionate share of the resources of the organisation and to exercise too much power over the activities of other organisational members.” Hence the case for taking a cool look at executive remuneration and other possible breaches of applying the classical virtue of temperance to corporate behaviour. The author is Principal Lecturer in the Business Studies Department, Manchester Metropolitan University, Aytoun Building, Aytoun Street, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • A Framework for Organizational Virtue: The Interrelationship of Mission, Culture and Leadership.J. Thomas Whetstone - 2005 - Business Ethics: A European Review 14 (4):367-378.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • A Framework for Organizational Virtue: The Interrelationship of Mission, Culture and Leadership.J. Thomas Whetstone - 2005 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 14 (4):367-378.
  • The Ethical Dimension of Economic Choices.Radu Vranceanu - 2005 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 14 (2):94–107.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Conceptions of God, Normative Convictions, and Socially Responsible Business Conduct An Explorative Study Among Executives.Johan Graafland, Muel Kaptein & Corrie Mazereeuw-van der Duijn Schouten - 2007 - Business and Society 46 (3):331-368.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • A Moral Grounding of the Duty to Further Justice in Commercial Life.Wim Dubbink - 2015 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (1):27-45.
    This paper argues that economic agents, including corporations, have the duty to further justice, not just a duty merely to comply with laws and do their share. The duty to further justice is the requirement to assist in the establishment of just arrangements when they do not exist in society. The paper is grounded in liberal theory and draws heavily on one liberal theorist, Kant. We show that the duty to further justice must be interpreted as a duty of virtue (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Editorial Introduction: Where is Business Ethics?Armin Beverungen & Peter Case - 2011 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 20 (3):229-232.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Practising Applied Ethics with Philosophical Integrity: The Case of Business Ethics.Deon Rossouw - 2008 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 17 (2):161–170.
    The unprecedented growth and demand for Applied Ethics since the last quarter of the previous century, has opened up a range of new opportunities for the discipline of Philosophy. While these new opportunities have been enthusiastically seized upon by some philosophers, others have frowned upon them or rejected them outright. In order to make sense of this demand for Applied Ethics training, I will first explore in general why this demand for Applied Ethics developed. I will then use the example (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • A Precis of a Communicative Theory of the Firm.Jeffery D. Smith - 2004 - Business Ethics: A European Review 13 (4):317-331.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • A Precis of a Communicative Theory of the Firm.Jeffery D. Smith - 2004 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 13 (4):317-331.
  • Rorty, Caputo and Business Ethics Without Metaphysics: Ethical Theories as Normative Narratives.Andrew Gustafson - 2010 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 19 (2):140-153.
    Using the works of Richard Rorty and John Caputo, I want to suggest that we might be better off treating the traditional ethical theories of Kant, Mill, Aristotle and Hobbes as normative narratives rather than as justificatory schemes for moral decision making to be set up against one another. In a spirit akin to Husserl's ‘bracketing’ of metaphysics, when discussing ethical theories in business ethics, we can easily avoid metaphysics and use an approach that sees ethical theory as socially convincing (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Courage as a Management Virtue.Howard Harris - 1999 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 18 (3/4):27-46.
  • Indications of Virtues in Conscientiousness and its Practice Through Continuous Improvement.José Hernández & Ricardo Mateo - 2012 - Business Ethics: A European Review 21 (2):140-153.
    There is convergence among researchers of the ‘Big Five’ personality traits taxonomy, that the dimension of conscientiousness best explains differences in work performance. This research is a literature review on the interrelationship between certain traits of the conscientiousness dimension and human virtues, or character traits. It also analyzes whether or not it is rational to argue that the continuous improvement culture enhances the exercise of these character traits. The personal effort to develop one's conscientiousness enriches one's character or way of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • In Defense of a Utilitarian Business Ethic.Andrew Gustafson - 2013 - Business and Society Review 118 (3):325-360.
    In this article, I suggest and support a utilitarian approach to business ethics. Utilitarianism is already widely used as a business ethic approach, although it is not well developed in the literature. Utilitarianism provides a guiding framework of decision making rooted in social benefit which helps direct business toward more ethical behavior. It is the basis for much of our discussion regarding the failures of Enron, Worldcom, and even the subprime mess and Wall Street Meltdown. In short, the negative social (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Putting Ethics and Economic Rationality Together: An Aristotelian and Philosophical Approach.Regina Maria da Cruz Queiroz - 2015 - Business Ethics: A European Review 24 (3):332-346.
    The gap between economic rationality, as embedded in utility maximization, and ethical rationality, identified with a set of rules that prescribe the right course of action, has been a challenging issue for economists, philosophers, and business ethicists. Despite the difference and the noncompetition between a scientific economic approach of economics and business ethics, and a behavioral and philosophical one, we highlight the importance of the Aristotelian concept of prudence or phronesis applied to business activity. Phronesis allows for a conceptualization of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Role of Character in Business Ethics.Edwin M. Hartman - 1998 - Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (3):547-559.
    There is good reason to take a virtue-based approach to business ethics. Moral principles are fairly useful in assessing actions, but understanding how moral people behave and how they become moral requires reference to virtues, some of which are important inbusiness. We must go beyond virtues and refer to character, of which virtues are components, to grasp the relationship between moralassessment and psychological explanation. Virtues and other character traits are closely related to (in technical terms, they superveneon) personality traits postulated (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   57 citations  
  • Moral Compromise and Personal Integrity: Exploring the Ethical Issues of Deciding Together in Organizations.Jerry D. Goodstein - 2000 - Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (4):805-819.
    In this paper I explore the topic of moral compromise in institutional settings and highlight how moral compromise may affirm,rather than undermine, personal integrity. Central to this relationship between moral compromise and integrity is a view of the self that is responsive to multiple commitments and grounded in an ethic of responsibility. I elaborate a number of virtues that are related to thisnotion of the self and highlight how these virtues may support the development of individuals who are responsive and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • The Many Faces of Integrity.Robert Audi & Patrick E. Murphy - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (1):3-21.
    Integrity is a central topic in business ethics, and in the world of business it is quite possibly the most commonly cited morally desirable trait. But integrity is conceived in widely differing ways, and as often as it is discussed in the literature and given a central place in corporate ethics statements, the notion is used so variously that its value in guiding everyday conduct may be more limited than is generally supposed. Two central questions for this paper are what (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  • Neither Bad Apple nor Bad Barrel: How the Societal Context Impacts Unethical Behavior in Organizations.Michael Gonin, Guido Palazzo & Ulrich Hoffrage - 2012 - Business Ethics: A European Review 21 (1):31-46.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Neither Bad Apple nor Bad Barrel: How the Societal Context Impacts Unethical Behavior in Organizations.Michael Gonin, Guido Palazzo & Ulrich Hoffrage - 2012 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 21 (1):31-46.
    Every time another corporate scandal captures media headlines, the ‘bad apple vs. bad barrel’ discussion starts anew. Yet this debate overlooks the influence of the broader societal context on organizational behavior. In this article, we argue that misbehaviors of organizations (the ‘barrels’) and their members (the ‘apples’) cannot be addressed properly without a clear understanding of their broader context (the ‘larder’). Whereas previously, a strong societal framework dampened the practical application of the Homo economicus concept (business actors as perfectly rational (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Teaching Ethics Cases: A Pragmatic Approach.Alan E. Singer - 2013 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 22 (1):16-31.
    A new framework-based approach to teaching and analyzing business ethics cases is set out. Using the framework, students are encouraged to adopt two different perspectives: business as usual and a more obviously moral point of view. Subsequently, they are prompted to craft a synthesis or compromise. Several pedagogical benefits flow from adopting the approach, including the cultivation of moral tolerance and improvements in the structure and scope of written action justifications. In addition, the framework enables students to relate ethical theories (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Conflicting Obligations, Moral Dilemmas and the Development of Judgement Through Business Ethics Education.Patrick Maclagan - 2012 - Business Ethics: A European Review 21 (2):183-197.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Conflicting Obligations, Moral Dilemmas and the Development of Judgement Through Business Ethics Education.Patrick Maclagan - 2012 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 21 (2):183-197.
    Learning to address moral dilemmas is important for participants on courses in business ethics and corporate social responsibility (CSR). While modern, rule-based ethical theory often provides the normative input here, this has faced criticism in its application. In response, post-modern and Aristotelian perspectives have found favour. This paper follows a similar line, presenting an approach based initially on a critical interpretation of Ross's theory of prima facie duties, which emphasises moral judgement in actual situations. However, the retention of a modern (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • The Ethics of Talent Management.Stephen Swailes - 2013 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 22 (1):32-46.
    Organisational approaches to talent management are often concerned with the ways that a small proportion of relatively high-performing employees are identified and managed in relation to the majority. Despite a growing literature on talent management, no papers have provided any guidance on how to evaluate it from an ethical standpoint. After considering what is meant by talent, this paper considers the ethical issues that arise from the operation of talent management programmes. These considerations are then used to create a framework (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Ethics of Talent Management.Stephen Swailes - 2013 - Business Ethics: A European Review 22 (1):32-46.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Pluralistic Business Ethics: The Significance and Justification of Moral Free Space in Integrative Social Contracts Theory.James Dempsey - 2011 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 20 (3):253-266.
    Integrative social contracts theory (ISCT) has been an influential theory in normative business ethics for well over a decade, drawing attention both as an object of criticism and as a source of inspiration. In this paper I argue that, despite this attention, the fact that it is a genuinely pluralistic theory, in the tradition of pluralistic theories of political philosophy, is often overlooked. It is in the notion of moral free space that this pluralism is most clearly expressed. This oversight (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Corporate Citizenship and Managerial Motivation: Implications for Business Legitimacy.Deborah Vidaver-Cohen & Peggy Simcic Brønn - 2008 - Business and Society Review 113 (4):441-475.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Thematic Symposium Editorial: Virtue Ethics Between East and West.Miguel Alzola, Alicia Hennig & Edward Romar - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 165 (2):177-189.
    Virtue ethics is widely recognized as one of three major approaches in contemporary moral philosophy and arguably the most influential normative theory in business ethics. Despite its rich pedigree in Western and Eastern philosophy, most work in contemporary virtue ethics is part of the Western tradition. The purpose of this Thematic Symposium is to foster dialogue between Western and Eastern conceptions of virtue in business and engage them with questions about the nature, justification, and content of the virtues in each (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Decent Work: The Moral Status of Labor in Human Resource Management.Miguel Alzola - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 147 (4):835-853.
    In this paper, I aim to critically examine a set of assumptions that pervades human resource management and HR practices. I shall argue that they experience a remarkable ethics deficit, explain why this is so, and explore how the UN Global Compact labor principles may help taking ethics seriously in HRM. This paper contributes to the understanding and critical examination of the undisclosed beliefs underlying theory and practice in human resource management and to the examination of how the UN Global (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Virtues Project: An Approach to Developing Good Leaders.Toby Newstead, Sarah Dawkins, Rob Macklin & Angela Martin - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 167 (4):605-622.
    Virtue words, such as justice, fairness, care, and integrity, frequently feature in organizational codes of conduct and theories of ethical leadership. And yet our modern organizations remain blemished by examples lacking virtue. The philosophy of virtue ethics and numerous extant theories of leadership cite virtues as essential to good leadership. But we seem to lack understanding of how to develop or embed these virtues and notions of good leadership in practice. In 2012, virtue ethicist Julia Annas pointed to a training (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Measuring Individuals’ Virtues in Business.David Dawson - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 147 (4):793-805.
    This paper argues that Shanahan and Hyman’s Virtue Ethics Scale should be abandoned and that work should begin to develop better-grounded measures for identifying individual business virtue in context. It comes to this conclusion despite the VES being the only existing measure of individuals’ virtues that focuses on business people in general, rather than those who hold specific leadership or audit roles. The paper presents a study that, in attempting to validate the VES, raises significant concerns about its construction. In (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Reflective Judgement: Understanding Entrepreneurship as Ethical Practice.Jean Clarke & Robin Holt - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (3):317 - 331.
    Recently, the ethical rather than just the economic resonance of entrepreneurship has attracted attention with researchers highlighting entrepreneurship and ethics as interwoven processes of value creation and management. Recognising that traditional normative perspectives on ethics are limited in application in entrepreneurial contexts, this stream of research has theorised entrepreneurship and ethics as the pragmatic production of useful effects through the alignment of public—private values. In this article, we critique this view and use Kant's concept of reflective judgement as discussed in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Understanding Social Welfare Capitalism, Private Property, and the Government’s Duty to Create a Sustainable Environment.Dennis R. Cooley - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):351-369.
    No one would deny that sustainability is necessary for individual, business, and national survival. How this goal is to be accomplished is a matter of great debate. In this article I will show that the United States and other developed countries have a duty to create sustainable cities, even if that is against a notion of private property rights considered as an absolute. Through eminent domain and regulation, developed countries can fulfill their obligations to current and future generations. To do (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • An Ethical Framework for the Marketing of Corporate Social Responsibility.Bert van de Ven - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):339-352.
    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to develop an ethical framework for the marketing of corporate social responsibility. Methods The approach is a conceptual one based on virtue ethics and on the corporate identity literature. Furthermore, empirical research results are used to describe the opportunities and pitfalls of using marketing communication tools in the strategy of building a virtuous corporate brand. Results/conclusions An ethical framework that addresses the paradoxical relation between the consequentialist perspective many proponents of the marketing of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • Normative Stakeholder Theory and Aristotle: The Link Between Ethics and Politics. [REVIEW]Nachoem M. Wijnberg - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 25 (4):329 - 342.
    Stakeholder theory is an important part of modern business ethics. Many scholars argue for a normative instead of an instrumental approach to stakeholder theory. Recent examples of such an approach show that problems appear with respect to the ethical foundation as well as the specification of the norms and the relation between corporate and individual responsibilities. This paper argues for the relevance of Aristotle's ideas on ethics and politics, and especially the link between them, for stakeholder theory. An Aristotelian approach (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  • How Virtue Fits Within Business Ethics.J. Thomas Whetstone - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 33 (2):101 - 114.
    This paper proposes that managers add an attention to virtues and vices of human character as a full complement to moral reasoning according to a deontological focus on obligations to act and a teleological focus on consequences (a balanced tripartite approach). Even if the criticisms of virtue ethics cloud its use as a mononomic normative theory of justification, they do not refute the substantial benefits of applying a human character perspective – when done so in conjunction with also-imperfect act-oriented perspectives. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   79 citations  
  • Ethical and Fair Work Behaviour: A Normative-Empirical Dialogue Concerning Ethics and Justice. [REVIEW]M. S. Singer - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 28 (3):187 - 209.
    Towards the general goal of generating a normative-empirical dialogue about ethics and justice, the present study explored three issues: (1) the extent to which the normative criteria of ethics and justice prescribed by moral philosophers are indeed reflected in managerial professionals' subjective beliefs of what ethical and just work behaviour ought to be, (2) the relationship between people's ought beliefs and their perceptions of actual ethical and just work behaviour, and (3) the relationship between the notions of ethics and justice. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • The Proactive Corporation: Its Nature and Causes. [REVIEW]Jon M. Shepard, Michael Betz & Lenahan O'Connell - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (10):1001-1010.
    We argue that the stakeholder perspective on corporate social responsibility is in the process of being enlarged. Due to the process of institutional isomorphism, corporations are increasingly adopting organizational features designed to promote proactivity over mere reactivity in their stakeholder relationships. We identify two sources of pressure promoting the emergence of the proactive corporation -- stakeholder activism and the recognition of the social embeddedness of the economy. The final section describes four organizational design dimensions being installed by the more proactive (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   53 citations  
  • The Contingency of Business: Narrative, Metaphor, and Ethics. [REVIEW]George D. Randels - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (12):1299 - 1310.
    The purpose of this paper is to discuss rival views of business and business ethics in terms of narrative. I want to show that we can tell various stories about business, and that our worldview narratives shape our accounts of business. These narratives not only involve description, but contain normative ramifications. We can only act within the world that we perceive. To evaluate competing narratives, I suggest dialectical comparison of the narratives with important values. The second part of the paper (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  • The Integrity Capacity Construct and Moral Progress in Business.Joseph A. Petrick & John F. Quinn - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 23 (1):3 - 18.
    The authors propose the integrity capacity construct with its four dimensions (process, judgment, development and system dimensions) as a framework for analyzing and resolving behavioral, moral and legal complexity in business ethics' issues at the individual and collective levels. They claim that moral progress in business comes about through the increase in stakeholders who regularly handle moral complexity by demonstrating process, judgment, developmental and system integrity capacity domestically and globally.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations