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  1. Riding in the Skin of the Movement: An Agogic Practice.Stephen J. Smith - 2015 - Phenomenology and Practice 9 (1):41-54.
    The art of riding imagines the human-horse relation in the image of the centaur. In synchronous motions, riding is a dance of sorts, contact of bodies in the skin of the moment. Yet always there is the possibility of fussing, flailing, falling and failing in moments of resistance, evasion and contrariness. Through phenomenological reflection on such moments, riding can be understood not simply in terms of its difficulties of centaurian mastery, but in terms of the postural, positional, gestural, expressive nuances (...)
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  • Awakening Movement Consciousness in the Physical Landscapes of Literacy: Leaving, Reading and Being Moved by One’s Trace.Rebecca J. Lloyd - 2011 - Phenomenology and Practice 5 (2):73-92.
    Physical literacy, a concept introduced by Britain’s physical education and phenomenological scholar, Margaret Whitehead, who aligned the term with her monist view of the human condition and emphasis that we are essentially embodied beings in-the-world, is a foundational hub of recent physical education curricular revision. The adoption of the term serves a political purpose as it helps stakeholders advocate for the educational, specifically literacy, rights of the whole child. Yet, one might wonder what impact conceptual shifts of becoming “physically literate” (...)
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  • Caring Caresses and the Embodiment of Good Teaching.Stephen Smith - 2012 - Phenomenology and Practice 6 (2):65-83.
    Attention is drawn to the movements of the body and to the ethical imperative that emerges in compelling, flowing moments of teaching. Such moments of teaching are not primarily intellectual, discursive events, but physical, sensual experiences in which the body surrenders to its own movements. Teaching is recognized momentarily as a carnal intensity embedded in and emerging from the flesh. The ethical imperative to this teaching is felt proprioceptively and kinaesthetically when one holds in self-motion the well-being of another as (...)
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