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  1. The Role of Co‐Occurrence Statistics in Developing Semantic Knowledge.Layla Unger, Catarina Vales & Anna V. Fisher - 2020 - Cognitive Science 44 (9).
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  • From Perceptual Categories to Concepts: What Develops?Vladimir M. Sloutsky - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (7):1244-1286.
    People are remarkably smart: They use language, possess complex motor skills, make nontrivial inferences, develop and use scientific theories, make laws, and adapt to complex dynamic environments. Much of this knowledge requires concepts and this study focuses on how people acquire concepts. It is argued that conceptual development progresses from simple perceptual grouping to highly abstract scientific concepts. This proposal of conceptual development has four parts. First, it is argued that categories in the world have different structure. Second, there might (...)
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  • Feature Selection for Inductive Generalization.Na-Yung Yu, Takashi Yamauchi, Huei-Fang Yang, Yen-Lin Chen & Ricardo Gutierrez-Osuna - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (8):1574-1593.
    Judging similarities among objects, events, and experiences is one of the most basic cognitive abilities, allowing us to make predictions and generalizations. The main assumption in similarity judgment is that people selectively attend to salient features of stimuli and judge their similarities on the basis of the common and distinct features of the stimuli. However, it is unclear how people select features from stimuli and how they weigh features. Here, we present a computational method that helps address these questions. Our (...)
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  • The Role of Words and Sounds in Infants' Visual Processing: From Overshadowing to Attentional Tuning.Vladimir M. Sloutsky & Christopher W. Robinson - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (2):342-365.
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  • Grammatical Gender and Inferences About Biological Properties in German-Speaking Children.Henrik Saalbach, Mutsumi Imai & Lennart Schalk - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (7):1251-1267.
    In German, nouns are assigned to one of the three gender classes. For most animal names, however, the assignment is independent of the referent’s biological sex. We examined whether German-speaking children understand this independence of grammar from semantics or whether they assume that grammatical gender is mapped onto biological sex when drawing inferences about sex-specific biological properties of animals. Two cross-linguistic studies comparing German-speaking and Japanese-speaking preschoolers were conducted. The results suggest that German-speaking children utilize grammatical gender as a cue (...)
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  • How Young Children Learn From Examples: Descriptive and Inferential Problems.Charles W. Kalish, Sunae Kim & Andrew G. Young - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (8):1427-1448.
    Three experiments with preschool- and young school-aged children (N = 75 and 53) explored the kinds of relations children detect in samples of instances (descriptive problem) and how they generalize those relations to new instances (inferential problem). Each experiment initially presented a perfect biconditional relation between two features (e.g., all and only frogs are blue). Additional examples undermined one of the component conditional relations (not all frogs are blue) but supported another (only frogs are blue). Preschool-aged children did not distinguish (...)
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  • Evolutionary Constraints on Human Object Perception.E. Koopman Sarah, Z. Mahon Bradford & F. Cantlon Jessica - 2017 - Cognitive Science:2126-2148.
    Language and culture endow humans with access to conceptual information that far exceeds any which could be accessed by a non-human animal. Yet, it is possible that, even without language or specific experiences, non-human animals represent and infer some aspects of similarity relations between objects in the same way as humans. Here, we show that monkeys’ discrimination sensitivity when identifying images of animals is predicted by established measures of semantic similarity derived from human conceptual judgments. We used metrics from computer (...)
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  • Salience Not Status: How Category Labels Influence Feature Inference.Mark K. Johansen, Justin Savage, Nathalie Fouquet & David R. Shanks - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (7):1594-1621.
    Two main uses of categories are classification and feature inference, and category labels have been widely shown to play a dominant role in feature inference. However, the nature of this influence remains unclear, and we evaluate two contrasting hypotheses formalized as mathematical models: the label special-mechanism hypothesis and the label super-salience hypothesis. The special-mechanism hypothesis is that category labels, unlike other features, trigger inference decision making in reference to the category prototypes. This results in a tendency for prototype-compatible inferences because (...)
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  • Normative Social Role Concepts in Early Childhood.Emily Foster‐Hanson & Marjorie Rhodes - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (8).
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  • Feature Biases in Early Word Learning: Network Distinctiveness Predicts Age of Acquisition.Tomas Engelthaler & Thomas T. Hills - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (6):n/a-n/a.
    Do properties of a word's features influence the order of its acquisition in early word learning? Combining the principles of mutual exclusivity and shape bias, the present work takes a network analysis approach to understanding how feature distinctiveness predicts the order of early word learning. Distance networks were built from nouns with edge lengths computed using various distance measures. Feature distinctiveness was computed as a distance measure, showing how far an object in a network is from other objects based on (...)
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  • Artifacts and Essentialism.Susan A. Gelman - 2013 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (3):449-463.
    Psychological essentialism is an intuitive folk belief positing that certain categories have a non-obvious inner “essence” that gives rise to observable features. Although this belief most commonly characterizes natural kind categories, I argue that psychological essentialism can also be extended in important ways to artifact concepts. Specifically, concepts of individual artifacts include the non-obvious feature of object history, which is evident when making judgments regarding authenticity and ownership. Classic examples include famous works of art (e.g., the Mona Lisa is authentic (...)
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  • Structured Semantic Knowledge Can Emerge Automatically From Predicting Word Sequences in Child-Directed Speech.Philip A. Huebner & Jon A. Willits - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • The Role of Words in Cognitive Tasks: What, When, and How?Christopher W. Robinson, Catherine A. Best, Wei Deng & Vladimir M. Sloutsky - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
  • Inductive Reasoning Differs Between Taxonomic and Thematic Contexts: Electrophysiological Evidence.Fangfang Liu, Jiahui Han, Lingcong Zhang & Fuhong Li - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • Words, Images and Concepts.Daniel A. Weiskopf - 2015 - Analysis 75 (1):99-109.
    Christopher Gauker proposes that all cognition can be divided into nonconceptual image-based thought and conceptual language-based thought. The division between the two hinges on the representational powers of their respective mediums. I argue that a richer variety of representational states and processes is necessary in order to explain both human and nonhuman cognition. There are aspects of nonhuman cognition that cannot be explained simply by images, and there are aspects of human conceptual thought, particularly those dealing with causal reasoning, that (...)
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  • Ontological Constraints in Children's Inductive Inferences: Evidence From a Comparison of Inferences Within Animals and Vehicles.Andrzej Tarlowski - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Predicting Reasoning From Visual Memory.Evan Heit & Brett K. Hayes - 2008 - In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 83--88.
  • Strength or Nausea? Children’s Reasoning About the Health Consequences of Food Consumption.Damien Foinant, Jérémie Lafraire & Jean-Pierre Thibaut - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Children’s reasoning on food properties and health relationships can contribute to healthier food choices. Food properties can either be positive or negative. One of the main challenges in public health is to foster children’s dietary variety, which contributes to a normal and healthy development. To face this challenge, it is essential to investigate how children generalize these positive and negative properties to other foods, including familiar and unfamiliar ones. In the present experiment, we hypothesized that children might rely on cues (...)
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  • Liked for Their Looks: Evaluative Conditioning and the Generalisation of Conditioned Attitudes in Early Childhood.Georg Halbeisen, Michael Schneider & Eva Walther - forthcoming - Cognition and Emotion:1-12.
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  • The Influence of Label Co-Occurrence and Semantic Similarity on Children’s Inductive Generalization.Bryan J. Matlen, Anna V. Fisher & Karrie E. Godwin - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Category Learning in a Dynamic World.Jessica S. Horst & Vanessa R. Simmering - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • The Development of Object Function and Manipulation Knowledge: Evidence From a Semantic Priming Study.Cynthia Collette, Isabelle Bonnotte, Charlotte Jacquemont, Solène Kalénine & Angela Bartolo - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • Development of Conceptual Flexibility in Intuitive Biology: Effects of Environment and Experience.Nicole Betz & John D. Coley - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  • Effects of Linguistic Labels on Visual Attention in Children and Young Adults.Wesley R. Barnhart, Samuel Rivera & Christopher W. Robinson - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Naming Influences 9-Month-Olds’ Identification of Discrete Categories Along a Perceptual Continuum.Mélanie Havy & Sandra R. Waxman - 2016 - Cognition 156:41-51.
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  • Semantic Similarity of Labels and Inductive Generalization: Taking a Second Look.Anna V. Fisher, Bryan J. Matlen & Karrie E. Godwin - 2011 - Cognition 118 (3):432-438.
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  • Processing of Perceptual Information is More Robust Than Processing of Conceptual Information in Preschool-Age Children: Evidence From Costs of Switching.Anna V. Fisher - 2011 - Cognition 119 (2):253-264.
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  • Building Theory-Based Concepts: Four-Year-Olds Preferentially Seek Explanations for Features of Kinds.Andrei Cimpian & Gina Petro - 2014 - Cognition 131 (2):300-310.
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  • Categorical Structure Among Shared Features in Networks of Early-Learned Nouns.Thomas T. Hills, Mounir Maouene, Josita Maouene, Adam Sheya & Linda Smith - 2009 - Cognition 112 (3):381-396.
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  • What Makes Words Special? Words as Unmotivated Cues.Pierce Edmiston & Gary Lupyan - 2015 - Cognition 143:93-100.
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  • The Basis of Epistemic Trust: Reliable Testimony or Reliable Sources?Paul L. Harris & Melissa A. Koenig - 2007 - Episteme 4 (3):264-284.
    What is the nature of children's trust in testimony? Is it based primarily on evidential correlations between statements and facts, as stated by Hume, or does it derive from an interest in the trustworthiness of particular speakers? In this essay, we explore these questions in an effort to understand the developmental course and cognitive bases of children's extensive reliance on testimony. Recent work shows that, from an early age, children monitor the reliability of particular informants, differentiate between those who make (...)
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  • The Basis of Epistemic Trust: Reliable Testimony or Reliable Sources?Melissa A. Koenig & Paul L. Harris - 2007 - Episteme: A Journal of Social Epistemology 4 (3):264-284.
    ABSTRACTWhat is the nature of children's trust in testimony? Is it based primarily on evidential correlations between statements and facts, as stated by Hume, or does it derive from an interest in the trustworthiness of particular speakers? In this essay, we explore these questions in an effort to understand the developmental course and cognitive bases of children's extensive reliance on testimony. Recent work shows that, from an early age, children monitor the reliability of particular informants, differentiate between those who make (...)
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  • Predicting Reasoning From Memory.Evan Heit & Brett K. Hayes - 2011 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 140 (1):76-101.
  • Similarity, Induction, Naming, and Categorization : Generalization or Inductive Reasoning? Reply to Heit and Hayes.Vladimir M. Sloutsky & Anna V. Fisher - 2005 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 134 (4):606-611.
  • Relations Among Categorization, Induction, Recognition, and Similarity: Comment on Sloutsky and Fisher.Evan Heit & Brett K. Hayes - 2005 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 134 (4):596-605.
  • Category Structure Affects the Developmental Trajectory of Children's Inductive Inferences for Both Natural Kinds and Artefacts.Julia R. Badger & Laura R. Shapiro - 2015 - Thinking and Reasoning 21 (2):206-229.
    Inductive reasoning is fundamental to human cognition, yet it remains unclear how we develop this ability and what might influence our inductive choices. We created novel categories in which crucial factors such as domain and category structure were manipulated orthogonally. We trained 403 4–9-year-old children to categorise well-matched natural kind and artefact stimuli with either featural or relational category structure, followed by induction tasks. This wide age range allowed for the first full exploration of the developmental trajectory of inductive reasoning (...)
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