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Autonomy After Auschwitz: Adorno, German Idealism, and Modernity

University of Chicago Press (2014)

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  1. Adorno's Tragic Vision.Markku Nivalainen - 2018 - Dissertation, University of Jyväskylä
    This dissertation deals with the tragic vision that motivates certain key aspects of Theodor W. Adorno’s philosophy. While in the formative early work, the Dialectic of Enlightenment, co-written with Max Horkheimer, the tragic views are clear, in later works, such as the Aesthetic Theory and the Negative Dialectics, they are only implicit. The study reconstructs the tragic vision found in the Dialectic of Enlightenment and uses it as a key to understand Adorno’s mature philosophy. A tragic vision is born when (...)
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  • Self-Mastery and Universal History: Horkheimer and Adorno on the Conditions of a Society ‘in Control of Itself’.David James - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (9):932-952.
    Horkheimer and Adorno make claims that imply a complete rejection of the idea of a universal history developed in classical German philosophy. Using Kant’s account of universal history, I argue that some features of the idea of a universal history can nevertheless be detected in the Dialectic of Enlightenment and some of Adorno’s remarks on freedom and history. This is done in connection with the kind of rational self-mastery that they associate with the story of Odysseus. Some claims made by (...)
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  • Adorno on Hope.Timo Jütten - 2019 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 45 (3):284-306.
    I argue that Theodor W. Adorno’s philosophy articulates a radical conception of hope. According to Lear, radical hope is ‘directed toward a future goodness that transcends the current ability to understand what it is’. Given Adorno’s claim that the current world is radically evil, and that we cannot know or even imagine what the good is, it is plausible that his conception of hope must be radical in this sense. I develop this argument through an analysis of Adorno’s engagement with (...)
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  • ‘After Auschwitz’: Writing history after injustice in Adorno and Lyotard.Javier Burdman - 2021 - Contemporary Political Theory 20 (4):815-835.
    Political philosophy in the last decades has turned away from universal narratives of progress, on grounds that these narratives produce exclusion and justify domination. However, the universal values that underlie emancipatory political projects seem to presuppose universal history, which explains its persistence in some contemporary political philosophers committed to such projects. In order to find a response to the paradox according to which universal history is inherently exclusionary and yet necessary to uphold universal values, I examine the contrast between Adorno’s (...)
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  • Adorno’s ‘Addendum’.Aaron Jaffe - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (8):855-876.
    Adorno’s ‘addendum’ names the experience by which socially constrained agents are jolted into resistance against their suffering. The impulse to action is simultaneously intra-mental and somatic, and thus forms the locus of a jointly conscious and bodily impetus to confronting the ideological and material forces that produce contemporary unfreedom. In this way the ‘addendum’ is a historically developing, indeterminate, yet inexhaustible glimmer of hope for both agents and theorists who make social suffering central to their critical analysis. This article explores (...)
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  • Moral Imagination and Adorno: Before and After Auschwitz.Catlyn Origitano - unknown
    In the aftermath of national or international tragedies, appeals for action such as, “Never Forget” or “Never Again” are ubiquitous. Theodor Adorno makes a similar call in the wake of the Holocaust, proclaiming that all education should be focused on the prevention of another genocide. While most would agree with such a statement, practically how do we respond to such a call, specifically in light of Adorno’s work? Answering this question is at the heart of this project and I argue (...)
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  • Theodor W. Adorno.L. Zuidevaart - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
     
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  • Theodor W. Adorno.Lambert Zuidervaart - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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