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  1. Organ Transplant Initiatives: The Twilight Zone.D. P. Price - 1997 - Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (3):170-175.
    Assessments of the acceptability of new transplantation practices require a pinpointing of not only the meaning of death, but also the timing of death. They typically perceive elective ventilation as occurring just prior to death and non-heart-beating donor protocols as operative just after death. However, such practices in fact highlight the general vagueness and ambiguity surrounding these issues in both law and ethics. Supply-side dilemmas in transplantation lend real urgency to this "life or death" debate.
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  • Elective Ventilation and the Politics of Death.Nathan Emmerich - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):153-157.
    This essay comments on the British Medical Association's recent suggestion that protocols for Elective Ventilation (EV) might be revived in order to increase the number of viable organs available for transplant. I suggest that the proposed revival results, at least in part, from developments in the contemporary political landscape, notably the decreasing likelihood of an opt-out system for the UK's Organ Donor Register. I go on to suggest that EV is unavoidably situated within complex debates surrounding the epistemology and ontology (...)
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  • ‘Elective’ Ventilation.Trevor Stammers - 2013 - The New Bioethics 19 (2):130-140.
    The demand for organs prompted the first use of elective ventilation in the UK in the 1990s. Recently the shortfall in supply of organs has once again prompted calls for elective ventilation to be instituted even in patients who are not brain dead. This paper proposes that the term ‘elective’ ventilation is a misnomer and the term non-therapeutic ventilation (NTV) should be used instead. It is further argued that the practice of NTV in cases of severe stroke is unethical and (...)
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  • Reanimation: Overcoming Objections and Obstacles to Organ Retrieval From Non-Heart-Beating Cadaver Donors.R. D. Orr, S. R. Gundry & L. L. Bailey - 1997 - Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (1):7-11.
    Interest in the retrieval of organs from non-heart-beating cadaver donors has been rekindled by the success of transplantation of solid organs and the insufficient supply of donor organs currently obtained from heart-beating cadaver donors. There are currently two retrieval techniques being evaluated, the in situ cold perfusion approach and the controlled death approach. Both, however, raise ethical concerns. Reanimation is a new method which has been used successfully in animals. We believe this new approach overcomes the ethical objections raised to (...)
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  • Ethical Considerations in the Application of Preconditioning to Solid Organ Transplantation.S. J. McNally - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (11):631-634.
    The shortage of organs for transplantation has led researchers to look for new techniques to expand the donor pool. Preconditioning strategies have the potential to protect organs from transplant associated injury or may improve the function of substandard organs so that they become suitable for transplantation. Translating this type of technology to the clinical setting raises ethical issues, particularly relating to the deceased donor. It is important that society has the opportunity to discuss the issues raised by implementation of preconditioning (...)
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