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  1. The Ineffable and the Incalculable: G. E. Moore on Ethical Expertise.Ben Eggleston - 2005 - In Lisa Rasmussen (ed.), Ethics Expertise: History, Contemporary Perspectives, and Applications. Springer. pp. 89–102.
    According to G. E. Moore, moral expertise requires abilities of several kinds: the ability to factor judgments of right and wrong into (a) judgments of good and bad and (b) judgments of cause and effect, (2) the ability to use intuition to make the requisite judgments of good and bad, and (3) the ability to use empirical investigation to make the requisite judgments of cause and effect. Moore’s conception of moral expertise is thus extremely demanding, but he supplements it with (...)
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  • Professionalism in Forensic Bioethics.Bethany J. Spielman - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (3):420-439.
    As the public profile of bioethics rises, and as litigation about issues ranging from assisted reproduction to gene therapy multiplies, the presence of bioethics experts in a litigation context has become more common. Dozens of appellate opinions refer to bioethics testimony in the lower courts. Today's technical advisory services for attorneys advertise bioethics experts along with experts in scientific fields. A single bioethicist has served as an expert in more than fifty cases. In all likelihood, opportunities for bioethicists to fill (...)
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  • Expert Testimony by Ethicists: What Should Be the Norm?Edward J. Imwinkelried - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):198-221.
    The term, “bioethics” was coined in 1970 by American cancerologist V. R. Potter. In the few decades since, the field of bioethics has emerged as an important discipline. The field has attained a remarkable degree of public recognition in a relatively short period of time. The “right to die” cases such as In re Quinlan placed bioethical issues on the front pages. Although the discipline is of recent vintage, the past quarter century has witnessed a flurry of scholarly activity, creating (...)
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  • Expert Testimony by Ethicists: What Should Be the Norm?Edward J. Imwinkelried - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):198-221.
    The term, “bioethics” was coined in 1970 by American cancerologist V. R. Potter. In the few decades since, the field of bioethics has emerged as an important discipline. The field has attained a remarkable degree of public recognition in a relatively short period of time. The “right to die” cases such as In re Quinlan placed bioethical issues on the front pages. Although the discipline is of recent vintage, the past quarter century has witnessed a flurry of scholarly activity, creating (...)
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  • The Question of Method in Ethics Consultation.George J. Agich - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (4):31 – 41.
    This paper offers an exposition of what the question of method in ethics consultation involves under two conditions: when ethics consultation is regarded as a practice and when the question of method is treated systematically. It discusses the concept of the practice and the importance of rules in constituting the actions, cognition, and perceptions of practitioners. The main body of the paper focuses on three elements of the question of method: canon, discipline, and history, which are treated heuristically to outline (...)
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  • Expert Testimony by a Bioethicist.John J. Paris - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (3):469-475.
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  • Bioética. El final del consenso.Maria Teresa López de la Vieja - 2008 - Azafea: Revista de Filosofia 10 (1).
    El Convenio de Oviedo, de 1997, demuestra la dificultad de llegar a acuerdos internacionales sobre cómo regular la investigación biomédica, en especial los límites de la investigación con embriones. Algunos temas de Bioética muestran la pluralidad de doctrinas y de sistemas morales; es más, pueden indicar el final de la era del consenso. El final de la pax bioetica, que tanto significó para el éxito de la disciplina a lo largo de tres décadas. Tender puentes, forjar consenso ha sido, en (...)
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