Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The critique of natural rights and the search for a non-anthropocentric basis for moral behavior.Michael E. Zimmerman - 1985 - Journal of Value Inquiry 19 (1):43-53.
    MacIntyre, Clark, and Heidegger would all agree that the current problem with moral theory is its lack of a satisfactory conception of human telos. This lack leads us to resort to such fictions as rights, interests, and utility, which are “disguises for the will to power.” Ibid., p. 240. These thinkers would also agree that modern nation-states are cut off from the roots of the Western tradition. Modern political economy, with “its individualism, its acquisitiveness and its elevation of the values (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Pantheism, Panentheism, and Ecosophy: Getting Back to Spinoza?Luca Valera & Gabriel Vidal - 2022 - Zygon 57 (3):545-563.
    Many authors in the field of Environmental Philosophy have claimed to be inspired by Spinoza's monism, which has traditionally been considered a form of pantheism because nature and God coincide. This idea has deep normative implications, as some environmental ethicists claim that wounding nature is the same as wounding God, which implies a resacralization of nature. In particular, we will focus on Arne Næss's Ecosophy (or Deep Ecology) to offer a current relevant example of the pantheist (or panentheist) worldview. However, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Moral metaphysics, moral revolutions, and environmental ethics.Roger Paden - 1990 - Agriculture and Human Values 7 (3-4):70-79.
    Many philosophers and environmentalists have advocated the development of a revolutionary new moral paradigm that treats natural objects as “morally considerable” in-themselves, independently of their relation to human beings. Often it is claimed that we need to develop a radically new theory of value to underpin this new paradigm. In this paper, I argue against this position and in favor of a more critical approach to environmental ethics. Such a critical approach, I believe, is not only more politically sound, but (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Environmental ethics and Spinoza's ethics. Comments on Genevieve Lloyd's article.Arne Naess - 1980 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 23 (3):313 – 325.
    The sheer complexity of Spinoza's thinking makes it impossible for any movement to use him as a patron. But philosophically engaged ecologists and environmentalists may find in his system an inexhaustible source of inspiration. This holds good even if he was personally a ?speciesist? and uninterested in animals or landscapes. Underestimation of his potential help is due to a variety of factors: failure to pay enough attention to the structure of his system, belief in its close resemblance to that of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • For They Do Not Agree In Nature: Spinoza and Deep Ecology.Gal Kober - 2013 - Ethics and the Environment 18 (1):43-65.
    In the Ethics,1 Spinoza presents a rigorous naturalistic view of man and nature. Man is a part of nature, a subject of the same domain—not a domain separate from it, nor a domain within that of nature. Man cannot act against nature or in an unnatural way; in comparison with any other part or creature of nature, man is not special, more important or qualitatively different. All general laws of nature apply equally to animals, inanimate objects, humans, God, the mind, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Spinoza and the possibilities for radical climate ethics.Hasana Sharp - 2017 - Dialogues in Human Geography 7 (2):156-60.
    In this commentary, I respond to the core question of Ruddick’s paper: How does the theoretical dethroning of humanity force us to reinvent ethics? In so doing, I expand on Spinoza’s profound contribution to the radical rethinking of the subject at the level of ontology. Although Ruddick invokes Spinoza, first and foremost, as a potential resource for ethics in light of climate disruption, I conclude that those resources offer only a glimmer of how to live differently. The work of re-imagination (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark