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Minds, Brains, and Science

Cambridge: Harvard University Press (1984)

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  1. The Nature of Appearance in Kant’s Transcendentalism: A Seman- Tico-Cognitive Analysis.Sergey L. Katrechko - 2018 - Kantian Journal 37 (3):41-55.
  • Intentionality, Mind and Folk Psychology.Winand H. Dittrich & Stephen E. G. Lea - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):39-41.
    The comment addresses central issues of a "theory theory" approach as exemplified in Gopnik' and Goldman's BBS-articles. Gopnik, on the one hand, tries to demonstrate that empirical evidence from developmental psychology supports the view of a "theory theory" in which common sense beliefs are constructed to explain ourselves and others. Focusing the informational processing routes possibly involved we would like to argue that his main thesis (e.g. idea of intentionality as a cognitive construct) lacks support at least for two reasons: (...)
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  • Slouching Towards Dualism. [REVIEW]David Sosa - 2001 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 55 (216):257-263.
    Searle may protest too much his anti-dualism. It may be that what needs reconsideration is not so much the traditional opposition between material and mental as the supposed opposition between property dualism and our contemporary scientific world view. Searle at one points notes that "[w]hen we come to the proposition that reality is physical, we come to what is perhaps the crux of the whole discussion." I agree.
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  • Mental Representation.David Pitt - 2020 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The notion of a "mental representation" is, arguably, in the first instance a theoretical construct of cognitive science. As such, it is a basic concept of the Computational Theory of Mind, according to which cognitive states and processes are constituted by the occurrence, transformation and storage (in the mind/brain) of information-bearing structures (representations) of one kind or another.
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  • Dismantling the Chinese Room with linguistic tools: a framework for elucidating concept-application disputes.Lawrence Lengbeyer - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-19.
    Imagine advanced computers that could, by virtue merely of being programmed in the right ways, act, react, communicate, and otherwise behave like humans. Might such computers be capable of understanding, thinking, believing, and the like? The framework developed in this paper for tackling challenging questions of concept application answers in the affirmative, contrary to Searle’s famous ‘Chinese Room’ thought experiment, which purports to prove that ascribing such mental processes to computers like these would be necessarily incorrect. The paper begins by (...)
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  • Judging Machines: Philosophical Aspects of Deep Learning.Arno Schubbach - forthcoming - Synthese 198 (2):1807-1827.
    Although machine learning has been successful in recent years and is increasingly being deployed in the sciences, enterprises or administrations, it has rarely been discussed in philosophy beyond the philosophy of mathematics and machine learning. The present contribution addresses the resulting lack of conceptual tools for an epistemological discussion of machine learning by conceiving of deep learning networks as ‘judging machines’ and using the Kantian analysis of judgments for specifying the type of judgment they are capable of. At the center (...)
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  • Etiological Explanations: Illness Causation Theory.Olaf Dammann - 2020 - Boca Raton, FL, USA: CRC Press.
    Theory of illness causation is an important issue in all biomedical sciences, and solid etiological explanations are needed in order to develop therapeutic approaches in medicine and preventive interventions in public health. Until now, the literature about the theoretical underpinnings of illness causation research has been scarce and fragmented, and lacking a convenient summary. This interdisciplinary book provides a convenient and accessible distillation of the current status of research into this developing field, and adds a personal flavor to the discussion (...)
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  • Unsolvable Problems, Visual Imagery, and Explanatory Satisfaction.Marc F. Krellenstein - 1995 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 16 (3):235-54.
    It has been suggested that certain problems may be unsolvable because of the mind's cognitive structure, but we may wonder what problems, and exactly why. The ultimate origin of the universe and the mind-body problem seem to be two such problems. As to why, Colin McGinn has argued that the mind-body problem is unsolvable because any theoretical concepts about the brain will be observation-based and unable to connect to unobservable subjective experience. McGinn's argument suggests a requirement of imagability -- an (...)
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  • Agent-Causation Revisited: Origination and Contemporary Theories of Free Will.Thad Botham - 2008 - Berlin, Germany: Verlag D Müller.
    Sometimes you make a choice. Whether or not you made it was up to you. The choice was free. But how can this be? A scientific view of the world may leave no room for free choice. Free will literature continually explodes. Yet experts still focus on control or on a power to do otherwise. Sadly, they neglect another intuitive feature of free will: being an underived source or ultimate originator. When acting freely, one is a self-determined, self-directed, sole author (...)
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  • Life: The Communicative Structure.Günther Witzany - 2000 - Norderstedt: Libri Books on Demand.
  • Intellectual Trespassing as a Way of Life: Essays in Philosophy, Economics, and Mathematics.David P. Ellerman - 1995 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Dramatic changes or revolutions in a field of science are often made by outsiders or 'trespassers,' who are not limited by the established, 'expert' approaches. Each essay in this diverse collection shows the fruits of intellectual trespassing and poaching among fields such as economics, Kantian ethics, Platonic philosophy, category theory, double-entry accounting, arbitrage, algebraic logic, series-parallel duality, and financial arithmetic.
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  • Modularity Need Not Imply Locality: Damaged Modules Can Have Nonlocal Effects.Edgar Zurif & David Swinney - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (1):89-90.
  • Parallel Distributed Processing Challenges the Strong Modularity Hypothesis, Not the Locality Assumption.David C. Plaut - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (1):77-78.
  • Representational Development and Theory-of-Mind Computations.David C. Plaut & Annette Karmiloff-Smith - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):70-71.
  • Reasonableness and Effectiveness in Argumentative Discourse: Fifty Contributions to the Development of Pragma-Dialectics.Bart Garssen, Frans Eemeren & Frans H. van Eemeren (eds.) - 2015 - Cham, Switzerland: Springer Verlag.
    How do Dutch people let each other know that they disagree? What do they say when they want to resolve their difference of opinion by way of an argumentative discussion? In what way do they convey that they are convinced by each other’s argumentation? How do they criticize each other’s argumentative moves? Which words and expressions do they use in these endeavors? By answering these questions this short essay provides a brief inventory of the language of argumentation in Dutch.
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  • The Role of Concepts in Perception and Inference.David R. Olson & Janet Wilde Astington - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):65-66.
  • What is so Practical About Theory? Lewin Revisited.Lloyd E. Sandelands - 1990 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 20 (3):235–262.
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  • The Concept of Work Feeling.Lloyd E. Sandelands - 1988 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 18 (4):437–457.
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  • Closure Principles and the Laws of Conservation of Energy and Momentum.Sophie Gibb - 2010 - Dialectica 64 (3):363-384.
    The conservation laws do not establish the central premise within the argument from causal overdetermination – the causal completeness of the physical domain. Contrary to David Papineau, this is true even if there is no non-physical energy. The combination of the conservation laws with the claim that there is no non-physical energy would establish the causal completeness principle only if, at the very least, two further causal claims were accepted. First, the claim that the only way that something non-physical could (...)
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  • Christopher Winch on the Representational Theory of Language and its Pedagogic Relevance.Jim Mackenzie - 2001 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 33 (1):35-56.
    In his recent paper, Winch attacks a group of theories he calls cognitivism. These theories agree in holding that ‘the ability to think, both consciously and subconsciously, amounts to an ability to internally manipulate symbolic representations of that which we think about.The relevance of this attack to education is that ‘Cognitivism’ supplies plausible‐looking reasons for thinking that learning can take place without instruction, practice, memorisation or training and its prestige as a theory of learning devalues those activities within education.Its rejection (...)
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  • The Light Bulb and the Turing-Tested Machine.Justin Leiber - 1992 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 22 (1):25–39.
  • Two Responses to Laura: Evers, and Phillips.. New Frontiers or Crossing the Bounds of Inference?Colin W. Evers - 1988 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 20 (1):70–75.
  • Against Naive Mentalism.Hugh T. Wilder - 1991 - Metaphilosophy (October) 281 (October):281-291.
  • Representation Redux.Hugh Wilder - 1988 - Metaphilosophy 19 (July-October):185-195.
  • Searle's Causal Powers.T. A. Warfield - 1999 - Analysis 59 (1):29-32.
  • The Action-Constitutive Theory of Monuments: A Strong Pragmatist Version.A. Martin Byers - 1992 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 22 (4):403–446.
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  • A Critique of the Inferential Paradigm in Perception.Aaron Ben-Zeev - 1987 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 17 (3):243–263.
  • A Biologist Looks at the Study of Consciousness.Jack Chamberlain - 2001 - Bioessays 23 (3):297-298.
  • On the Distinctively Human: Two Perspectives on the Evolution of Language and Conscious Mind.Osmo Kivinen & Tero Piiroinen - 2012 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 42 (1):87-105.
    In this paper, two alternative naturalistic standpoints on the relations between language, human consciousness and social life are contrasted. The first, dubbed “intrinsic naturalism,” is advocated among others by the realist philosopher John Searle; it starts with intrinsic intentionality and consciousness emerging from the brain, explains language as an outgrowth of consciousness and ends with institutional reality being created by language-use. That standpoint leans on what may be described as the standard interpretation of Darwinian evolution. The other type of naturalism, (...)
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  • Are We Our Brains?Stephen Burwood - 2009 - Philosophical Investigations 32 (2):113-133.
    My aim in this paper is to destabilise the brain-is-self thesis, something that is now regarded in some quarters as philosophical commonsense. My contention is that it is the epithelial body that enters into the formation of our sense of self and that largely bears the burden of personal identity as well as playing the key role in grounding our psychological ascriptions. Lacking any sensorimotor or social presence of its own, the brain by itself cannot "underlie" selfhood, but only as (...)
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  • Agential Knowledge, Action and Process.Ben Wolfson - 2012 - Theoria 78 (4):326-357.
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  • Artificial Intelligence Inheriting the Historical Crisis in Psychology: An Epistemological and Methodological Investigation of Challenges and Alternatives.Mohamad El Maouch & Zheng Jin - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    By following the arguments developed by Vygotsky and employing the cultural-historical activity theory in addition to dialectical logic, this paper attempts to investigate the interaction between psychology and artificial intelligence to confront the epistemological and methodological challenges encountered in AI research. The paper proposes that AI is facing an epistemological and methodological crisis inherited from psychology based on dualist ontology. The roots of this crisis lie in the duality between rationalism and objectivism or in the mind-body rupture that has governed (...)
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  • ‘Consciousness’ and Brain Functions: A Re-Look From Functionalist Perspective.Suresh Muruganandam - 2022 - International Journal of Philosophy 10 (1):1.
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  • Artificial Intelligence, Biology, and Intentional States.Terrell Ward Bynum - 1985 - Metaphilosophy 16 (October):355-77.
  • Real Acquaintance and Physicalism.Philip Goff - 2015 - In Paul Coates & Sam Coleman (eds.), Phenomenal Qualities: Sense, Perception and Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
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  • Brain Simulation and Personhood: A Concern with the Human Brain Project.Daniel Lim - 2014 - Ethics and Information Technology 16 (2):77-89.
    The Human Brain Project (HBP) is a massive interdisciplinary project involving hundreds of researchers across more than eighty institutions that seeks to leverage cutting edge information and communication technologies to create a multi-level brain simulation platform (BSP). My worry is that some brain models running on the BSP will be persons. If this is right then not only will the in silico experiments the HBP envisions being carried on the BSP be unethical the mere termination of certain brain models running (...)
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  • Materialism, Dualism, and the Philosophy of Yoga.Gerald James Larson - 2013 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 17 (2):181-219.
  • Are False Beliefs Representative Mental States?Karen Bartsch & David Estes - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):30-31.
  • The Psychologist's Fallacy.Philip David Zelazo & Douglas Frye - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):89-90.
  • Diseases of the Understanding and the Need for Philosophical Therapy.Eugen Fischer - 2011 - Philosophical Investigations 34 (1):22-54.
    The paper develops and addresses a major challenge for therapeutic conceptions of philosophy of the sort increasingly attributed to Wittgenstein. To be substantive and relevant, such conceptions have to identify “diseases of the understanding” from which philosophers suffer, and to explain why these “diseases” need to be cured in order to resolve or overcome important philosophical problems. The paper addresses this challenge in three steps: With the help of findings and concepts from cognitive linguistics and cognitive psychology, it redevelops the (...)
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  • Evolution of Consciousness.John C. Eccles - 1992 - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Usa 89:7320-24.
  • How to Practise Philosophy as Therapy: Philosophical Therapy and Therapeutic Philosophy.Eugen Fischer - 2011 - Metaphilosophy 42 (1-2):49-82.
    Abstract: The notion that philosophy can be practised as a kind of therapy has become a focus of debate. This article explores how philosophy can be practised literally as a kind of therapy, in two very different ways: as philosophical therapy that addresses “real-life problems” (e.g., Sextus Empiricus) and as therapeutic philosophy that meets a need for therapy which arises in and from philosophical reflection (e.g., Wittgenstein). With the help of concepts adapted from cognitive and clinical psychology, and from cognitive (...)
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  • 1% Skepticism.Eric Schwitzgebel - 2017 - Noûs 51 (2):271-290.
    A 1% skeptic is someone who has about a 99% credence in non-skeptical realism and about a 1% credence in the disjunction of all radically skeptical scenarios combined. The first half of this essay defends the epistemic rationality of 1% skepticism, appealing to dream skepticism, simulation skepticism, cosmological skepticism, and wildcard skepticism. The second half of the essay explores the practical behavioral consequences of 1% skepticism, arguing that 1% skepticism need not be behaviorally inert.
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  • Against Naive Mentalism.Hugh Wilder - 1991 - Metaphilosophy 22 (4):281-291.
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  • Names, Contents, and Causes.Fred Adams & Gary Fuller - 1992 - Mind and Language 7 (3):205-21.
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  • The Golden Age of Polish Philosophy. Kaziemierz Twardowski’s Philosophical Legacy.Sandra Lapointe, Jan Wolenski, Mathieu Marion & Wioletta Miskiewicz (eds.) - 2009 - Dordrecht, Netherland: Springer.
    This volume portrays the Polish or Lvov-Warsaw School, one of the most influential schools in analytic philosophy, which, as discussed in the thorough introduction, presented an alternative working picture of the unity of science.
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  • Phenomenology and Mathematics.Mirja Hartimo (ed.) - 2010 - Dordrecht, Netherland: Springer.
    This volume aims to establish the starting point for the development, evaluation and appraisal of the phenomenology of mathematics.
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  • Agent Causation and Free Will: A Case for Libertarianism.Thad Botham - 2018 - In Lenny Clapp (ed.), Philosophy for Us. Cognella. pp. 49-58.
    Some people endorse a view called incompatibilism, which states that free will is incompatible with determinism. No free action could possibly be determined, they think. More informatively, incompatibilists think it is impossible that someone’s freely acting be causally guaranteed to happen by things that occur before she freely acts. Some people hold a view called libertarianism, which states both that incompatibilism is true and that someone actually performs a free action. Other people reject incompatibilism. They hold to compatibilism, which is (...)
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  • Creation, Bugs, and Emergence.William Hasker - 2021 - Journal of Philosophical Theological Research 23 (3):93-112.
    An argument is presented, based on a common-sense interpretation of an everyday experience, for emergent dualism as the best available account of the origin of the human mind/soul. Emergent dualism is superior to subjective idealism in that it honors the common-sense conviction that the things we encounter have a real, physical existence, separate from our mental perceptions of them. It is superior to materialism in that it allows for our mental states to have real, physical effects, distinct from the effects (...)
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  • Margaret Lucas Cavendish.David Cunning - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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