Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Students’ Reasoning About Whether to Report When Others Cheat: Conflict, Confusion, and Consequences.Talia Waltzer, Arvid Samuelson & Audun Dahl - 2021 - Journal of Academic Ethics 20 (2):265-287.
    Nearly all students believe academic cheating is wrong, yet few students say they would report witnessed acts of cheating. To explain this apparent tension, the present research examined college students’ reasoning about whether to report plagiarism or other forms of cheating. Study 1 examined students’ conflicts when deciding whether to report cheating. Most students gave reasons against reporting a peer as well as reasons in favor of reporting. Study 2 provided experimental confirmation that the contextual factors referenced by Study 1 (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Unethical Practices in Online Classes During COVID-19 Pandemic: An Analysis of Affordances Using Routine Activity Theory.Ummaha Hazra & Asad Karim Khan Priyo - forthcoming - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society.
    Purpose While online classes have enabled many universities to carry out their regular academic activities, they have also given rise to new and unanticipated ethical concerns. We focus on the “dark side” of online class settings and attempt to illuminate the ethical problems associated with them. The purpose of this study is to investigate the affordances stemming from the technology-user interaction that can result in negative outcomes. We also attempt to understand the context in which these deleterious affordances are actualized. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Study of Cheating Beliefs, Engagement, and Perception – The Case of Business and Engineering Students.Carla M. Ghanem & Najib A. Mozahem - 2019 - Journal of Academic Ethics 17 (3):291-312.
    Studies have found that academic dishonesty is widespread. Of particular interest is the case of business students since many are expected to be the leaders of tomorrow. This study examines the cheating behaviors and perceptions of 819 business and engineering students at three private Lebanese universities, two of which are ranked as the top two universities in the country. Our results show that cheating is pervasive in the universities to an alarming degree. We first analyzed the data by looking at (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Cultural Differences in Academic Dishonesty: A Social Learning Perspective.Nhung T. Hendy, Nathalie Montargot & Antigoni Papadimitriou - 2021 - Journal of Academic Ethics 19 (1):49-70.
    In this study, we examined the role of social learning theory in explaining academic dishonesty among 673 college students in the United States, France, and Greece. We found support for social learning theory such that perceived peer dishonesty was incrementally valid as a predictor of self-reported academic dishonesty across three countries beyond personal factor of conscientiousness and demographic factor of age. Contrary to expectation, perceived penalty for academic cheating received support in the U.S. sample only. Justification for academic dishonesty contributed (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Comparing Business School Faculty Classification for Perceptions of Student Cheating.Gary Blau, Roman Szewczuk, Jennifer Fitzgerald, Dennis A. Paris & Mike Guglielmo - 2018 - Journal of Academic Ethics 16 (4):301-315.
    Faculty continue to address academic dishonesty in their classes. In this follow-up to an earlier study on general perceived faculty student cheating, using a sample of business school faculty, we compared three levels of faculty classification: full-time non-tenure track, full-time tenured/tenure-track, and part-time adjuncts. Results showed that NTTs perceived higher levels for three different types of student cheating, i.e., paper-based, forbidden teamwork, and hiring someone to take an exam. In addition, NTTs were more likely to report a student for cheating. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation