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  1. Consumer Response to Corporate Hypocrisy From the Perspective of Expectation Confirmation Theory.Wang Zhigang, Zhang Lei & Liu Xintao - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  • How and When Does Corporate Giving Lead to Getting? An Investigation of the Relationship Between Corporate Philanthropy and Relative Competitive Performance from a Micro-process Perspective.Wenwen Zhao & Zhe Zhang - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 166 (2):425-440.
    The corporate ethics literature has considerably focused on whether giving results in getting. However, the relationship between corporate philanthropy and performance and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Drawing on signaling and cue consistency theories, we develop and test a model that specifies whether, how, and when corporate philanthropy benefits relative competitive performance from a micro-process perspective. Using a Chinese sample of 1623 employees, 145 CEOs, and 145 human resources managers, we found that corporate philanthropy could positively influence relative competitive performance (...)
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  • Echoes of Corporate Social Responsibility: How and When Does CSR Influence Employees’ Promotive and Prohibitive Voices?Juan Wang, Zhe Zhang & Ming Jia - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 167 (2):253-269.
    In this study, we examine whether, how, and when corporate social responsibility increases promotive and prohibitive voices in accordance with ethical climate theory and multi-experience model of ethical climate. Data from 382 employees at two time points are examined. Results show that CSR is positively related to promotive and prohibitive voices. Other-focused and self-focused climates mediate the relationship between CSR and the two types of voice. Moreover, humble leadership moderates the positive relationship between CSR and other-focused climate. Such leadership moderates (...)
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  • Effect of Matching Between the Adopted Corporate Response Strategy and the Type of Hypocrisy Manifestation on Consumer Behavior: Mediating Role of Negative Emotions.Zhigang Wang, Xintao Liu, Lei Zhang, Chao Wang & Rui Liu - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Consumers may sense hypocrisy in corporate social responsibility if they note inconsistency in enterprises’ words and deeds related to CSR. This inconsistency originates from the intentional selfish actions and unintentional actions of enterprises. Studies have revealed that consumers’ perception of hypocrisy has a negative influence on enterprise operation. However, studies have not examined how corporate responses to consumers’ hypocrisy perception affect consumers’ attitude and behavior. Therefore, the present study attempted to determine the measures that should be undertaken by enterprises to (...)
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  • When Aspirational Talk Backfires: The Role of Moral Judgements in Employees’ Hypocrisy Interpretation.Lucas Amaral Lauriano, Juliane Reinecke & Michael Etter - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 181 (4):827-845.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) aspirations by companies have been identified as a motivating factor for active employee participation in CSR implementation. However, a failure to practise what one preaches can backfire and lead to attribution of hypocrisy. Drawing on a qualitative study of an award-winning sustainability pioneer in the cosmetics sector, we explore the role of moral judgement in how and when employees interpret word–deed misalignment in CSR implementation as hypocritical. First, our case reveals that high CSR aspirations by companies (...)
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  • Incumbent Stakeholder Management Performance and New Entry.André Laplume, Kent Walker, Zhou Zhang & Xin Yu - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (3):629-644.
    Instrumental stakeholder theory seeks to explain how managing stakeholders effectively can yield competitive advantage for incumbent firms. We extend instrumental stakeholder theory to explain and predict future competition operationalized as new entrepreneurial entries. Our study is among the first to empirically examine the relationships between aggregate stakeholder management performance and the entrepreneurial entries of individuals. Using a combined U.S. dataset from 2003 to 2013 from the Kinder, Lydenberg and Domini Index, Compustat, and Kauffman’s Entrepreneurship Survey, we find support for three (...)
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  • Employee Volunteer Programs are Associated with Firm-Level Benefits and CEO Incentives: Data on the Ethical Dilemma of Corporate Social Responsibility Activities.Brian D. Knox - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (2):449-472.
    Ethical dilemmas arise when one must decide between conflicting ethical imperatives. One potential ethical dilemma is a manager’s decision of whether to engage in corporate social responsibility activities. This decision could pit the ethical imperative of honoring unwritten obligations to society against the ethical imperative of honoring contractual obligations to the firm. However, CSR activities might only be a minor ethical dilemma or none at all if they simultaneously benefit the firm and society. To examine this I test the association (...)
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  • Shareholder Value Effects of Ethical Sourcing: Comparing Reactive and Proactive Initiatives.Seongtae Kim & Sangho Chae - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (3):887-906.
    With the advent of responsible business, ensuring social responsibility in sourcing is of interest to both academics and practitioners. In this study, we examine one way of achieving this goal: ethical sourcing initiatives (ESIs). ESIs refer to a firm’s formal and informal actions to manage sourcing processes in an ethical and socially responsible manner. While ESIs have been established as an important part of corporate social responsibility, it is unclear whether, how, and when this corporate effort is economically beneficial. We (...)
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  • Advances in Employee-Focused Micro-Level Research on Corporate Social Responsibility: Situating New Contributions Within the Current State of the Literature.David A. Jones, Alexander Newman, Ruodan Shao & Fang Lee Cooke - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 157 (2):293-302.
    This editorial outlines the articles included in the special thematic symposium on corporate social responsibility and employees and highlights their contributions to the literature. In doing so, it highlights the novel theoretical and empirical insights provided by the articles, how the articles inform and expand the methods and research designs researchers can use to study phenomena in this area, and identifies promising directions for future research.
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  • Like It or Not: When Corporate Social Responsibility Does Not Attract Potential Applicants.Eva Alexandra Jakob, Holger Steinmetz, Marius Claus Wehner, Christina Engelhardt & Rüdiger Kabst - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (1):105-127.
    Companies increasingly recognize the importance of communicating corporate social responsibility including their engagement toward employees, the community, the environment and other stakeholder groups to attract applicants. The positive findings on the effect of CSR on applicants’ reactions are commonly based on the assumption that companies send a clear signal about their commitment to CSR. However, communication is always contextualized and has become more ambiguous through the increased availability of information online. External stakeholders including actual and potential applicants are confronted with (...)
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  • Corporate Social Performance and the Likelihood of Bankruptcy: Evidence from a Period of Economic Upswing.Florian Habermann & Felix Bernhard Fischer - 2023 - Journal of Business Ethics 182 (1):243-259.
    The paper aims to investigate the effects of corporate social performance (CSP) on bankruptcy likelihood in times of economic upswing. This is important because prior related literature focused on data containing times of economic crises. We measure bankruptcy likelihood with the Altman Z score and CSP with Refinitiv ESG scores. By applying static panel data regressions and instrumental variable regressions on a sample of 6696 US-firm-year observations from 2010 to 2019 our main findings are: (i) In contrast to existing research, (...)
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  • When the Private and the Public Self Don’t Align: The Role of Discrepant Moral Identity Dimensions in Processing Inconsistent CSR Information.Ramona Demasi & Christian Voegtlin - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-24.
    Inconsistent information between an organization’s corporate social responsibility commitments and perceived CSR action is a big challenge for organizations because this is typically associated with perceptions of corporate hypocrisy and related negative stakeholder reactions. However, in contrast to the prevailing corporate hypocrisy literature we argue that inconsistent CSR information does not always correspond to perceptions of corporate hypocrisy; rather, responses depend on individual predispositions in processing CSR-related information. In this study, we investigate how an individual’s moral identity shapes reactions to (...)
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  • Corporate Social (Ir)responsibility and Corporate Hypocrisy: Warmth, Motive and the Protective Value of Corporate Social Responsibility.Zhifeng Chen, Haiming Hang, Stephen Pavelin & Lynda Porter - 2020 - Business Ethics Quarterly 30 (4):486-524.
    ABSTRACTThis article examines how a firm’s prior record on corporate social responsibility influences individual stakeholders’ perceptions of corporate hypocrisy in the wake of a corporate social irresponsibility event. Our research extends extant corporate hypocrisy literature by highlighting the role of individual stakeholders’ inferences about a genuine CSR motive in their judgments of corporate hypocrisy. This can serve to differentiate perceived corporate hypocrisy from inconsistency that arises because of a lack of ability and/or resources. Our research further identifies a source for (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility and Employee Outcomes: Interrelations of External and Internal Orientations with Job Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment.Erifili-Christina Chatzopoulou, Dimitris Manolopoulos & Vasia Agapitou - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (3):795-817.
    We bring together social identity and social exchange perspectives to develop and test a moderated mediation model that sheds light on employees’ perceptions regarding the interrelations between an organization’s external and internal CSR initiatives and their job attitudes and work behaviours. This is important because employees’ sensemaking of CSR motives as being either self-focussed or others-focussed can produce meaningful variations in their job satisfaction and the dimensions of organizational commitment. Also, the consolidation of CSR’s underlying psychological mechanisms can advance our (...)
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  • Different Drivers: Exploring Employee Involvement in Corporate Philanthropy.Beth Breeze & Pamala Wiepking - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 165 (3):453-467.
    Corporate Philanthropy is multi-dimensional, differs between sectors and involves both individual and organisational decision-making to achieve business and social goals. However, the CP literature characteristically focuses on strategic decisions made by business leaders and ignores the role of employees, especially those in lower status and lower paid positions. To redress this imbalance, we conducted a qualitative study of employees’ involvement in CP processes in ten workplaces in the South East of England to identify whether and how they are involved in (...)
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