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  1. When Brain Computer Interfaces Move From Research to Commercial Use.Christian B. J. Hansen - 2015 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 45 (3):356-360.
    This paper will explore how ethical concerns change when brain computer interfaces move from a research setting into a commercial setting. This paper will argue that the transition from research to commercial settings might change the intentions for the artefact and will explore hypothesis of what this change might affect. This paper will discuss how possible intentions for brain computer interfaces in commercial settings will have an impact on the products developed and what consequences this might have for individuals and (...)
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  • The Storytelling Brain: Commentary on “On Social Attribution: Implications of Recent Cognitive Neuroscience Research for Race, Law, and Politics”.Sanjay K. Nigam - 2012 - Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):567-571.
    The well-established techniques of the professional storyteller not only have the potential to model complex “truth” but also to dig deeply into that complexity, thereby perhaps getting closer to that truth. This applies not only to fiction, but also to medicine and even science. Compelling storytelling ability may have conferred an evolutionary survival advantage and, if so, is likely represented in the neural circuitry of the human brain. Functional imaging will likely point to a neuroanatomical basis for compelling storytelling ability; (...)
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  • Editors' Overview: Neuroethics: Many Voices and Many Stories.Michael Kalichman, Dena Plemmons & Stephanie J. Bird - 2012 - Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):423-432.
    Advances in neuroscience continue to enhance understanding of the brain and provide new tools to take advantage of that understanding. These changes are poised to profoundly alter society. Given that the impact will be felt not only by neuroscientists, but by diverse members of society, it is imperative that conversations engage all stakeholders. Doing so will allow for the sharing of diverse views and perspectives to understand and frame the science, better educate and prepare the public for new developments, and (...)
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