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  1. E quator P rinciples: Bridging the Gap between Economics and Ethics?Manuel Wörsdörfer - 2015 - Business and Society Review 120 (2):205-243.
    The hypothetical conflict between self‐interest, corporate interest, and the common good is one of the hottest debated issues in business ethics. This article focuses on a particular corporate social responsibility approach within the field of sustainable (project) finance, which has the potential—given that certain reform measures are adopted—to overcome the alleged trade‐off between self‐interest and the common good. The approach is labeled as the Equator Principles (EPs) framework, which celebrated its tenth anniversary and the formal launch of the third generation (...)
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  • The Equator Principles and Human Rights Due Diligence – Towards a Positive and Leverage-based Concept of Corporate Social Responsibility.Manuel Wörsdörfer - 2015 - Philosophy of Management 14 (3):193-218.
    The article is guided by two main research questions: First, do the Equator Principles (EPs), a voluntary CSR-initiative in the project finance sector, and the recently published working paper of the Thun Group of Banks adequately address the U.N. Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights or do they fall behind the ‘Ruggie framework’? Second, is the demand for human rights due diligence sufficient to classify the EPs as a positive and leverage-based concept of CSR (à la Wettstein and Wood) (...)
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  • “Political” Corporate Social Responsibility in Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises: A Conceptual Framework.Christopher Wickert - 2016 - Business and Society 55 (6):792-824.
    “Political” corporate social responsibility involves businesses taking a political role to address “regulatory gaps” caused by weak or insufficient social and environmental standards and norms. The literature on political CSR focuses mostly on how large multinational corporations can address environmental and social problems that arise globally along their supply chains. This article addresses political CSR of small- and medium-sized enterprises. SMEs represent a major share of economic value creation worldwide and are increasingly exposed to regulatory gaps. Although SMEs differ substantially (...)
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  • The Political Perspective of Corporate Social Responsibility: A Critical Research Agenda.Glen Whelan - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (4):709-737.
    ABSTRACT:I here advance a critical research agenda for the political perspective of corporate social responsibility (Political CSR). I argue that whilst the ‘Political’ CSR literature is notable for both its conceptual novelty and practical importance, its development has been hamstrung by four ambiguities, conflations and/or oversights. More positively, I argue that ‘Political’ CSR should be conceived as one potentialformof globalization, and not as aconsequenceof ‘globalization’; that contemporary Western MNCs should be presumed to engage in CSR for instrumental reasons; that ‘Political’ (...)
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  • The Duty to Protect: Corporate Complicity, Political Responsibility, and Human Rights Advocacy. [REVIEW]Florian Wettstein - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (1):33 - 47.
    Recent years have heralded increasing attention to the role of multinational corporations in regard to human rights violations. The concept of complicity has been of particular interest in this regard. This article explores the conceptual differences between silent complicity in particular and other, more "conventional" forms of complicity. Despite their far-reaching normative implications, these differences are often overlooked.Rather than being connected to specific actions as is the case for other forms of complicity, the concept of silent complicity is tied to (...)
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  • Silence as Complicity: Elements of a Corporate Duty to Speak Out Against the Violation of Human Rights.Florian Wettstein - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (1):37-61.
    ABSTRACT:Increasingly, global businesses are confronted with the question of complicity in human rights violations committed by abusive host governments. This contribution specifically looks at silent complicity and the way it challenges conventional interpretations of corporate responsibility. Silent complicity implies that corporations have moral obligations that reach beyond the negative realm of doing no harm. Essentially, it implies that corporations have a moral responsibility to help protect human rights by putting pressure on perpetrating host governments involved in human rights abuses. This (...)
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  • For Better or For Worse: Corporate Responsibility Beyond “Do No Harm”.Florian Wettstein - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (2):275-283.
    ABSTRACT:Do corporations have a duty to promote just institutions? Agreeing with Hsieh’s recent contribution, this article argues that they do. However, contrary to Hsieh, it holds that such a claim cannot be advanced convincingly only by reference to the negative duty to do no harm. Instead, such a duty necessarily must be grounded in positive obligation. In the search of a foundation for a positive duty for corporations to further just institutions, Stephen Kobrin’s notion of “private political authority” offers a (...)
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  • For Better or For Worse: Corporate Responsibility Beyond “Do No Harm”.Florian Wettstein - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (2):275-283.
    ABSTRACT:Do corporations have a duty to promote just institutions? Agreeing with Hsieh’s recent contribution, this article argues that they do. However, contrary to Hsieh, it holds that such a claim cannot be advanced convincingly only by reference to the negative duty to do no harm. Instead, such a duty necessarily must be grounded in positive obligation. In the search of a foundation for a positive duty for corporations to further just institutions, Stephen Kobrin’s notion of “private political authority” offers a (...)
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  • Beyond Voluntariness, Beyond CSR: Making a Case for Human Rights and Justice.Florian Wettstein - 2009 - Business and Society Review 114 (1):125-152.
  • Silence as Complicity: Elements of a Corporate Duty to Speak Out Against the Violation of Human Rights.Florian Wettstein - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (1):37-61.
    ABSTRACT:Increasingly, global businesses are confronted with the question of complicity in human rights violations committed by abusive host governments. This contribution specifically looks at silent complicity and the way it challenges conventional interpretations of corporate responsibility. Silent complicity implies that corporations have moral obligations that reach beyond the negative realm of doing no harm. Essentially, it implies that corporations have a moral responsibility to help protect human rights by putting pressure on perpetrating host governments involved in human rights abuses. This (...)
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  • Uncommitted Deliberation? Discussing Regulatory Gaps by Comparing GRI 3.1 to GRI 4.0 in a Political CSR Perspective.Rea Wagner & Peter Seele - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (2):333-351.
    In this paper, we compare the two Global Reporting Initiative reporting standards, G3.1, and the most current version G4.0. We do this through the lens of political corporate social responsibility theory, which describes the broadened understanding of corporate responsibility in a globalized world building on Habermas’ notion of deliberative democracy and ethical discourse. As the regulatory power of nation states is fading, regulatory gaps occur as side effects of transnational business. As a result, corporations are also understood to play a (...)
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  • Beyond Corporate Responsibility: Implications for Management Development.Sandra Waddock & Malcolm Mcintosh - 2009 - Business and Society Review 114 (3):295-325.
    Since the mid‐1990s we have witnessed the rise of numerous constructive and positive activities aimed at developing or enhancing corporate responsibility and corporate citizenship as well as anti‐globalization and anticorporate activism. And, of course, in 2008, we witnessed the meltdown of financial markets and numerous financial institutions as well as some major companies teetering on the brink of collapse. What is actually needed to create the world that many people want to live in may in fact be a new relationship (...)
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  • Accountability in a Global Economy.Sandra Waddock - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (1):23-44.
    This article assesses the proliferation of international accountability standards (IAS) in the recent past. We provide a comprehensive overview about the different types of standards and discuss their role as part of a new institutional infrastructure for corporate responsibility. Based on this, it is argued that IAS can advance corporate responsibility on a global level because they contribute to the closure of some omnipresent governance gaps. IAS also improve the preparedness of an organization to give an explanation and a justification (...)
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  • Responsible Innovation and the Innovation of Responsibility: Governing Sustainable Development in a Globalized World.Christian Voegtlin & Andreas Georg Scherer - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (2):227-243.
    Earth’s life-support system is facing megaproblems of sustainability. One important way of how these problems can be addressed is through innovation. This paper argues that responsible innovation that contributes to sustainable development consists of three dimensions: innovations avoid harming people and the planet, innovations ‘do good’ by offering new products, services, or technologies that foster SD, and global governance schemes are in place that facilitate innovations that avoid harm and ‘do good.’ The paper discusses global governance schemes based on deliberation (...)
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  • Responsible Leadership in Global Business: A New Approach to Leadership and Its Multi-Level Outcomes. [REVIEW]Christian Voegtlin, Moritz Patzer & Andreas Georg Scherer - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 105 (1):1-16.
    The article advances an understanding of responsible leadership in global business and offers an agenda for future research in this field. Our conceptualization of responsible leadership draws on deliberative practices and discursive conflict resolution, combining the macro-view of the business firm as a political actor with the micro-view of leadership. We discuss the concept in relation to existing research in leadership. Further, we propose a new model of responsible leadership that shows how such an understanding of leadership can address the (...)
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  • Development of a Scale Measuring Discursive Responsible Leadership.Christian Voegtlin - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (S1):57-73.
    The paper advances the conceptual understanding of responsible leadership and develops an empirical scale of discursive responsible leadership. The concept of responsible leadership presented here draws on deliberative practices and discursive conflict resolution, combining the macro-view of the business firm as a political actor with the micro-view of leadership. Ideal responsible leadership conduct thereby goes beyond the dyadic leader–follower interaction to include all stakeholders. The paper offers a definition and operationalization of responsible leadership. The studies that have been conducted to (...)
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  • How Do Firms Comply with International Sustainability Standards? Processes and Consequences of Adopting the Global Reporting Initiative.Laurence Vigneau, Michael Humphreys & Jeremy Moon - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 131 (2):469-486.
    This paper addresses the issue of the influence of global governance institutions, particularly international sustainability standards, on a firm’s intra-organizational practices. More precisely, we provide an exploratory empirical view of the impact of the Global Reporting Initiative on a multinational corporation’s corporate social responsibility management practices. We investigate standard compliance by comparing the stated intention of the use of the GRI with its actual use and the consequent effects within the firm. Based on an in-depth case study, our findings illustrate (...)
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  • The Role of Corporations in Shaping the Global Rules of the Game: In Search of New Foundations.J. van Oosterhout - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (2):253-264.
    ABSTRACT:Although a research focus on the increasing involvement of corporations in shaping and maintaining the global rules of the game points out promising avenues for future research, it simultaneously makes clear how little currently established, mostly managerial conceptual frameworks have to offer in making sense of these developments. It is argued that we need to expand the rather restricted perspectives that these frameworks provide, in order to explore new conceptual foundations that will not only enable us to travel the confines (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosures, Traditionalism and Politics: A Story from a Traditional Setting.Shahzad Uddin, Javed Siddiqui & Muhammad Azizul Islam - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (2):409-428.
    This paper demonstrates the political perspective of corporate social responsibility disclosures and, drawing on Weber’s notion of traditionalism, seeks to explain what motivates companies to make such disclosures in a traditional setting. Annual reports of 23 banking companies in Bangladesh are analysed over the period 2009–2012. This is supplemented by a review of documentary evidence on the political and social activities of corporations and reports published in national and international newspapers. We found that, in the banking companies over the period (...)
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  • Sector-based corporate citizenship.Laura Timonen & Vilma Luoma-aho - 2009 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 19 (1):1-13.
    This paper approaches the much-debated issue of corporate citizenship (CC). Many models depict the development process of CC, and yet attempts to find one extensive definition remain in progress. We argue that more than one type of citizenship may be needed to fully describe the concept. So far, social factors have dominated the definitions of CC, but citizenship functions can also be found in other areas. In fact, for maximum benefit, the type of citizenship should be tied to the sector (...)
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  • Sector-based corporate citizenship.Laura Timonen & Vilma Luoma-aho - 2009 - Business Ethics 19 (1):1-13.
    This paper approaches the much-debated issue of corporate citizenship (CC). Many models depict the development process of CC, and yet attempts to find one extensive definition remain in progress. We argue that more than one type of citizenship may be needed to fully describe the concept. So far, social factors have dominated the definitions of CC, but citizenship functions can also be found in other areas. In fact, for maximum benefit, the type of citizenship should be tied to the sector (...)
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  • Understanding political responsibility in corporate citizenship: towards a shared responsibility for the common good.Marcel Verweij, Vincent Blok & Tjidde Tempels - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (1):90-108.
    ABSTRACTIn this article, we explore the debate on corporate citizenship and the role of business in global governance. In the debate on political corporate social responsibility it is assumed that under globalization business is taking up a greater political role. Apart from economic responsibilities firms assume political responsibilities taking up traditional governmental tasks such as regulation of business and provision of public goods. We contrast this with a subsidiarity-based approach to governance, in which firms are seen as intermediate actors who (...)
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  • Organizational Moral Learning: What, If Anything, Do Corporations Learn from NGO Critique?Heiko Spitzeck - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):157-173.
    While organizational learning literature has generated significant insight into the effective and efficient achievement of organizational goals as well as to the modus of learning, it is currently unable to describe moral learning processes in organizations consistently. Corporations need to learn morally if they want to deal effectively with stakeholders criticizing their conduct. Nongovernmental organizations do not ask corporations to be more effective or efficient in what they do, but to become more responsible or to learn morally. Current research on (...)
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  • Can Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives Improve Global Supply Chains? Improving Deliberative Capacity with a Stakeholder Orientation.Vivek Soundararajan, Jill A. Brown & Andrew C. Wicks - 2019 - Business Ethics Quarterly 29 (3):385-412.
    ABSTRACT:Global multi-stakeholder initiatives are important instruments that have the potential to improve the social and environmental sustainability of global supply chains. However, they often fail to comprehensively address the needs and interests of various supply-chain participants. While voluntary in nature, MSIs have most often been implemented through coercive approaches, resulting in friction among their participants and in systemic problems with decoupling. Additionally, in those cases in which deliberation was constrained between and amongst participants, collaborative approaches have often failed to materialize. (...)
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  • Exploitation and Sweatshop Labor: Perspectives and Issues.Jeremy Snyder - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (2):187-213.
    In this review, I survey theoretical accounts of exploitation in business, chiefly through the example of low wage or sweatshop labor. This labor is associated with wages that fall below a living wage standard and include long working hours. Labor of this kind is often described as self-evidently exploitative and immoral (Van Natta 1995). But for those who defend sweatshop labor as the first rung on a ladder toward greater economic development, the charge that sweatshop labor is self-evidently exploitative fails (...)
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  • Navigating Our Way Between Market and State.Jeffery Smith - 2019 - Business Ethics Quarterly 29 (1):127-141.
    ABSTRACT:In this address I argue that different perspectives on the normative foundations of corporate responsibility reflect underlying disagreements about the ideal arrangement of tasks between market and state. I initially recommend that scholars look back to the “division of moral labor” inspired by John Rawls’ seminal work on distributive justice in order to rethink why, and to what extent, corporations take on responsibilities normally within the purview of government. I then examine how this notion is related to recent theoretical work (...)
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  • A Political Account of Corporate Moral Responsibility.Jeffery Smith - 2011 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (2):223 - 246.
    Should we conceive of corporations as entities to which moral responsibility can be attributed? This contribution presents what we will call a political account of corporate moral responsibility. We argue that in modern, liberal democratic societies, there is an underlying political need to attribute greater levels of moral responsibility to corporations. Corporate moral responsibility is essential to the maintenance of social coordination that both advances social welfare and protects citizens' moral entitlements. This political account posits a special capacity of self-governance (...)
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  • The Value of Unregulated Business-NGO Interaction.Andreas Scherer - 2014 - Business and Society 53 (2):157-186.
    Political theories in general and deliberative democracy in particular have become quite popular in business ethics over the past few years. However, the model of deliberative democracy as generally referred to in business ethics is only appropriate for conceptualizing interaction between business and society which occurs within a context which is more or less institutionalized. The model cannot account for “unregulated” interaction between business and civil society. The authors argue that scholars need to resort to the so called “critical strand” (...)
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  • The Political Role of the Business Firm.Andreas Scherer - 2014 - Business and Society 53 (2):226-259.
    This article contributes to the debate about the political role of the business firm. The article clarifies what is meant by the “political” role of the firm and how this political role relates to its economic role. To this end, the authors present an ordonomic concept of corporate citizenship and illustrate the concept by way of comparison with the Aristotelian idea of individual citizenship for the antique polis. According to our concept, companies take a political role if they participate in (...)
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  • The Enduring Potential of Justified Hypernorms.Markus Scholz, Gastón de los Reyes & N. Craig Smith - 2019 - Business Ethics Quarterly 29 (3):317-342.
    ABSTRACT:The profound influence of Thomas Donaldson and Thomas Dunfee’s integrative social contracts theory on the field of business ethics has been challenged by Andreas Scherer and Guido Palazzo’s Habermasian approach, which has achieved prominence of late with articles that expressly question the defensibility of ISCT’s hypernorms. This article builds on recent efforts by Donaldson and Scherer to bridge their accounts by providing discursive foundations to the hypernorms at the heart of the ISCT framework. Extending prior literature, we propose an ISCT* (...)
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  • Introduction to the Special Issue: Globalization as a Challenge for Business Responsibilities.Andreas Georg Scherer, Guido Palazzo & Dirk Matten - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (3):327-347.
    This article assesses some of the implications of globalization for the scholarly debate on business ethics, CSR and related concepts. The argument is based, among other things, on the declining capacity of nation state institutions to regulate socially desirable corporate behavior as well as the growing corporate exposure to heterogeneous social, cultural and political values in societies globally. It is argued that these changes are shifting the corporate role towards a sphere of societal governance hitherto dominated by traditional political actors. (...)
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  • Trade associations and corporate social responsibility: evidence from the UK water and film industries.Anja Schaefer & Finola Kerrigan - 2008 - Business Ethics: A European Review 17 (2):171-195.
    In highly structured organisational fields individual efforts to deal rationally with uncertainty and constraints tend to lead, in the aggregate, to greater homogeneity in structure, culture and output. Drawing on institutional theory, this paper develops research propositions regarding the nature and scope of corporate social responsibility (CSR) engagement at trade/industry association level. The cases of the water and sewerage and film industries are used in order to test these propositions. The findings suggest that (a) trade associations in more homogeneous industries (...)
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  • Trade associations and corporate social responsibility: Evidence from the UK water and film industries.Anja Schaefer & Finola Kerrigan - 2008 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 17 (2):171–195.
    In highly structured organisational fields individual efforts to deal rationally with uncertainty and constraints tend to lead, in the aggregate, to greater homogeneity in structure, culture and output. Drawing on institutional theory, this paper develops research propositions regarding the nature and scope of corporate social responsibility (CSR) engagement at trade/industry association level. The cases of the water and sewerage and film industries are used in order to test these propositions. The findings suggest that (a) trade associations in more homogeneous industries (...)
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  • State Power: Rethinking the Role of the State in Political Corporate Social Responsibility.Judith Schrempf-Stirling - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (1):1-14.
    Key accomplishments of political corporate social responsibility scholarship have been the identification of global governance gaps and a proposal how to tackle them. Political CSR scholarship assumes that the traditional roles of state and business have eroded, with states losing power and business gaining power in a globalized world. Consequently, the future of CSR lies in political CSR with new global governance forms which are organized by mainly non-state actors. The objective of the paper is to deepen our understanding of (...)
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  • Public Health and Political Corporate Social Responsibility: Pharmaceutical Company Engagement in COVAX.Markus Scholz, N. Craig Smith, Maria Riegler & Anna Burton - forthcoming - Business and Society.
    Pharmaceutical companies developed Covid-19 vaccines in record time. However, it soon became apparent that global access to the vaccines was inequitable. Through a qualitative inquiry as the pandemic unfolded (to mid-2021), we provide an in-depth analysis of why companies engaged with the Covid-19 Vaccines Global Access Facility (COVAX), identifying the internal (to the company) and external factors that facilitated or impeded engagement. While all producers of the World Health Organization (WHO)-approved vaccines engaged with COVAX, our analysis highlights the differential levels (...)
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  • Positive Economics and the Normativistic Fallacy: Bridging the Two Sides of CSR.Philipp Schreck, Dominik van Aaken & Thomas Donaldson - 2013 - Business Ethics Quarterly 23 (2):297-329.
    ABSTRACT:In response to criticism of empirical or “positive” approaches to corporate social responsibility (CSR), we defend the importance of these approaches for any CSR theory that seeks to have practical impact. Although we acknowledge limitations to positive approaches, we unpack the neglected but crucial relationships between positive knowledge on the one hand and normative knowledge on the other in the implementation of CSR principles. Using the structure of a practical syllogism, we construct a model that displays the key role of (...)
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  • Progressive and Conservative Firms in Multistakeholder Initiatives: Tracing the Construction of Political CSR Identities Within the Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh.Maximilian J. L. Schormair & Kristin Huber - 2021 - Business and Society 60 (2):454-495.
    The proliferation of multistakeholder initiatives (MSIs) over the past years has sparked an intense debate on the political role of corporations in the governance of global business conduct. To gain a better understanding of corporate political behavior in multistakeholder governance, this article investigates how firms construct a political identity when participating in MSIs. Based on an in-depth case study of the Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh—an MSI established after the collapse of the Rana Plaza garment factory complex (...)
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  • Introduction to the Special Issue: Globalization as a Challenge for Business Responsibilities.Andreas Georg Scherer, Guido Palazzo & Dirk Matten - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (3):327-347.
    This article assesses some of the implications of globalization for the scholarly debate on business ethics, CSR and related concepts. The argument is based, among other things, on the declining capacity of nation state institutions to regulate socially desirable corporate behavior as well as the growing corporate exposure to heterogeneous social, cultural and political values in societies globally. It is argued that these changes are shifting the corporate role towards a sphere of societal governance hitherto dominated by traditional political actors. (...)
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  • Embracing ambiguity - lessons from the study of corporate social responsibility throughout the rise and decline of the modern welfare state.Anselm Schneider - 2014 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 23 (3):293-308.
    In the work of Karl Polanyi, the negative effects of a self-regulating market economy are described as being limited by societal forces such as the policies of the welfare state. With the decline of the modern welfare state since the late 1970s, social activities of business firms are increasingly regarded as an important complement to or even as a substitute for welfare state policies by a part of the literature. However, and controversially, another stream of argumentation regards these activities as (...)
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  • Creating Value by Sharing Values: Managing Stakeholder Value Conflict in the Face of Pluralism through Discursive Justification.Maximilian J. L. Schormair & Dirk Ulrich Gilbert - 2021 - Business Ethics Quarterly 31 (1):1-36.
    ABSTRACTThe question of how to engage with stakeholders in situations of value conflict to create value that includes a plurality of conflicting stakeholder value perspectives represents one of the crucial current challenges of stakeholder engagement as well as of value creation stakeholder theory. To address this challenge, we conceptualize a discursive sharing process between affected stakeholders that is oriented toward discursive justification involving multiple procedural steps. This sharing process provides procedural guidance for firms and stakeholders to create pluralistic stakeholder value (...)
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  • Corporate Governance in a Risk Society.Anselm Schneider & Andreas Georg Scherer - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (2):1-15.
    Under conditions of growing interconnectedness of the global economy, more and more stakeholders are exposed to risks and costs resulting from business activities that are neither regulated nor compensated for by means of national governance. The changing distribution of risks poses a threat to the legitimacy of business firms that normally derive their legitimacy from operating in compliance with the legal rules of democratic nation states. However, during the process of globalization, the regulatory power of nation states has been weakened (...)
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  • Bound to Fail? Exploring the Systemic Pathologies of CSR and Their Implications for CSR Research.Anselm Schneider - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (7):1303-1338.
    Among critics of corporate social responsibility (CSR), there is growing concern that CSR is largely ineffective as a corrective to the shortcomings of capitalism, namely, the negative effects of business on society and the undersupply of public goods. At the same time, researchers suggest that despite the shortcomings of CSR, it is possible to make it more effective in a stepwise manner. To explain the frequent failures of current CSR practices and to explore the possibilities of remedying them, I examine (...)
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  • Post-Westphalia and Its Discontents: Business, Globalization, and Human Rights in Political and Moral Perspective.Michael A. Santoro - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (2):285-297.
    ABSTRACT:This article examines the presuppositions and theoretical frameworks of the “new-wave” “Post-Westphalian” approach to international business ethics and compares it to the more philosophically oriented moral theory approach that has predominated in the field. I contrast one author’s Post-Westphalian political approach to the human rights responsibilities of transnational corporations (TNCs) with my own “Fair Share” theory of moral responsibility for human rights. I suggest how the debate about the meaning of corporate human rights “complicity” might be informed by the fair (...)
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  • Beyond Corporate Responsibility: Implications for Management Development.Malcolm Mcintosh Sandra Waddock - 2009 - Business and Society Review 114 (3):295-325.
    Since the mid‐1990s we have witnessed the rise of numerous constructive and positive activities aimed at developing or enhancing corporate responsibility and corporate citizenship as well as anti‐globalization and anticorporate activism. And, of course, in 2008, we witnessed the meltdown of financial markets and numerous financial institutions as well as some major companies teetering on the brink of collapse. What is actually needed to create the world that many people want to live in may in fact be a new relationship (...)
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  • Talk Ain’t Cheap: Political CSR and the Challenges of Corporate Deliberation.Cameron Sabadoz & Abraham Singer - 2017 - Business Ethics Quarterly 27 (2):183-211.
    ABSTRACT:Deliberative democratic theory, commonly used to explore questions of “political” corporate social responsibility, has become prominent in the literature. This theory has been challenged previously for being overly sanguine about firm profit imperatives, but left unexamined is whether corporate contexts are appropriate contexts for deliberative theory in the first place. We explore this question using the case of Starbucks’ “Race Together” campaign to show that significant challenges exist to corporate deliberation, even in cases featuring genuinely committed firms. We return to (...)
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  • CSR Beyond Economy and Society: A Post-capitalist Approach.Steffen Roth, Vladislav Valentinov, Markus Heidingsfelder & Miguel Pérez-Valls - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 165 (3):411-423.
    In this article, we draw on established views of CSR dysfunctionalities to show how and why CSR is regularly observed to be both shaped by and supportive of capitalism. We proceed to show that these dysfunctionalities are maintained by both the pro- and anticapitalist approaches to CSR, both of which imply an ill-defined separation of the economy and society as well an overly strong problem or solution focus on political and economic issues. Finally, we present a post-capitalist approach to CSR (...)
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  • Liberal Thought in Reasoning on CSR.Ulf Henning Richter - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (4):625 - 649.
    In this article, I argue that conventional reasoning on corporate social responsibility (CSR) is based on the assumption of a liberal market economy in the context of a nation state. I build on the study of Scherer and Palazzo (Acad Manage Rev 32(4):1096-1120, 2007), developing a number of criteria to identify elements of liberal philosophy in the ongoing CSR debate. I discuss their occurrence in the CSR literature in detail and reflect on the implications, taking into account the emerging political (...)
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  • Drivers of Change: A Multiple-Case Study on the Process of Institutionalization of Corporate Responsibility Among Three Multinational Companies. [REVIEW]Ulf Henning Richter - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (2):261-279.
    In this multiple-case study, I analyze the perceived importance of seven categories of institutional entrepreneurs (DiMaggio, Institutional patterns and organizations, Ballinger, Cambridge, MA, 1988 ) for the corporate social responsibility discourse of three multinational companies. With this study, I aim to significantly advance the empirical analysis of the CSR discourse for a better understanding of facts and fiction in the process of institutionalization of CSR in MNCs. I conducted 42 semi-structured face-to-face and phone interviews in two rounds with 30 corporate (...)
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  • Transnational Representation in Global Labour Governance and the Politics of Input Legitimacy.Juliane Reinecke & Jimmy Donaghey - 2022 - Business Ethics Quarterly 32 (3):438-474.
    Private governance raises important questions about democratic representation. Rule making is rarely based on electoral authorisation by those in whose name rules are made—typically a requirement for democratic legitimacy. This requires revisiting the role of representation in input legitimacy in transnational governance, which remains underdeveloped. Focussing on private labour governance, we contrast two approaches to the transnational representation of worker interests in global supply chains: non-governmental organisations providing representative claims versus trade unions providing representative structures. Studying the Bangladesh Accord for (...)
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  • Qualitative Methods in Business Ethics, Corporate Responsibility, and Sustainability Research.Juliane Reinecke, Denis G. Arnold & Guido Palazzo - 2016 - Business Ethics Quarterly 26 (4):xiii-xxii.
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