Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Rabbit and the Duck : Antinomic Unity in Dostoevskij, the Russian Religious Tradition, and Mikhail Bakhtin.Ksana Blank - 2007 - Studies in East European Thought 59 (1-2):21 - 37.
    At the core of Dostoevskij's philosophy and theology lies a concept according to which the Truth (Istina) is antinomical: it contains both a thesis and its antithesis without expectation of synthesis. This concept can be traced to Eastern Patristics. After Dostoevskij, the theory of antinomies was elaborated by 20th century Russian religious thinkers such as Pavel Florenskij, Sergej Bulgakov, Nikolaj Berdjaev, Semën Frank, and Vladimir Losskij. Their ideas help us to understand that Dostoevskij's dialogism, made famous in its secular guise (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Tolstoj as Analytic Thinker: His Philosophical Defense of Nonviolence.James P. Scanlan - 2011 - Studies in East European Thought 63 (1):7 - 14.
    By way of countering Tolstoj's reputation as an alogical and inept philosophical thinker, this paper explores the tension between maximalism and reasonableness in his defense of the ethics of nonviolence. Tolstoj's writings of the last decade of his life show that he was perfectly capable of making appropriate conceptual distinctions, recognizing legitimate objections to his position, and responding rationally to them; in so doing, he made valuable points about the unpredictability of human actions, the futility of using violence to combat (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Dostoevskij’s Guide to Spiritual Epiphany in The Brothers Karamazov.Julian W. Connolly - 2007 - Studies in East European Thought 59 (1-2):39 - 54.
    The essay examines the three main epiphanic experiences in The Brothers Karamazov and shows how Dostoevskij's treatment of these experiences may offer a guide to spiritual renewal. The three experiences are Alësha's vision of the resurrected Zosima and transfigured Christ, Dmitrij's vision of the suffering babe, and Ivan's vision of the devil (which serves as a counter example to the first two). By examining the content of each of these visions, as well as the parallels and variations in the scenes (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Stranger Within: Dostoevsky’s Underground.Peter Roberts - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (4):396-408.
    In Fyodor Dostoevsky?s influential novel Notes from underground, we find one of the most memorable characters in nineteenth century literature. The Underground Man, around whom everything else in this book revolves, is in some respects utterly repugnant: he is self-centred, obsessive and cruel. Yet he is also highly intelligent, honest and reflective, and he has suffered significantly at the hands of others. Reading Notes from underground can be a harrowing experience but also an educative one, for in an encounter with (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • “Ridiculous” Dream Versus Social Contract: Dostoevskij, Rousseau, and the Problem of Ideal Society.Olga Stuchebrukhov - 2007 - Studies in East European Thought 59 (1-2):101 - 169.
    Drawing on the Second Discourse and the Social Contract and Notes from Underground and “The Dream of a Ridiculous Man,” this essay examines the striking similarities and fundamental differences between Dostoevskij’s and Rousseau’s treatment of the problem of individual vs. society and their notions of ideal social relations. The essay investigates Rousseau’s attempt to absorb morality into politics and “to concretize” Diderot’s universal moral man into citizen. It also suggests that Dostoevskij takes Rousseau’s attempt at concretization a step further by (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Unorthodox Confession, Orthodox Conscience: Aesthetic Authority in the Underground.Sharon Lubkemann Allen - 2007 - Studies in East European Thought 59 (1-2):65-85.
    Dostoevskij’s underground parody of confession paradoxically recovers an Orthodox morality by constructing an unorthodox model of authority and authorship. The authenticity and authority of underground discourse are both contingent on self-conscious parody, which also mediates Orthodox community or sobornost’. This essay critically reconsiders ethical, aesthetic and cultural dimensions of the self-conscious interpolation of literary and religious discourses in Dostoevskij’s Notes from Underground. Arguing with and against Bakhtinian readings, it re-examines the underground narrator’s secularized, Romanticized sensibilities, cynical critique of humanism, sacrilegious (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark