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  1. Who is ruining farmers markets? Crowds, fraud, and the fantasy of “real food”.Sang-Hyoun Pahk - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):19-31.
    Critical food scholars have long noted that much of local food discourse in the US is underwritten by a deeply regressive agrarian imaginary that valorizes “small family farms” while erasing historical legacies of racism. In this paper, I examine one influential expression of the agrarian imaginary that I call the fantasy of “real food,” and illustrate how that discourse contributes to ongoing exclusions in farmers markets. Drawing on Lacanian psychoanalysis, I explain how the fantasy of real food positions white middle-class (...)
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  • Translating Land Justice Through Comparison: A US–French Dialogue and Research Agenda.Megan Horst, Nathan McClintock, Adrien Baysse-Lainé, Ségolène Darly, Flaminia Paddeu, Coline Perrin, Kristin Reynolds & Christophe-Toussaint Soulard - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (4):865-880.
    In this discussion piece, eight scholars in geography, urban planning, and agri-food studies from the United States and France engage in a bi-national comparison to deepen our collective understanding of food and land justice. We specifically contextualize land justice as a critical component of food justice in both the US and France in three key areas: access to land for cultivation, urban agriculture, and non-agricultural forms of food provisioning. The US and France are interesting cases to compare, considering the differences (...)
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  • Extending Ethical Consumerism Theory to Semi-Legal Sectors: Insights From Recreational Cannabis.Elizabeth A. Bennett - 2018 - Agriculture and Human Values 35 (2):295-317.
    Ethical consumerism theory aims to describe, explain, and evaluate the ways in which producers and consumers use the market to support social and environmental values. The literature draws insights from empirical studies of sectors that largely take place on the legal market, such as textiles and agri-food. This paper takes a first step toward theorizing ethical consumerism in semi-legal sectors where market activities occur legally and illegally. How does extant theory extend to sectors such as sex work, cigarettes, and recreational (...)
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  • Drawing Lines in the Cornfield: An Analysis of Discourse and Identity Relations Across Agri-Food Networks.Sarah Rotz - 2018 - Agriculture and Human Values 35 (2):441-456.
    In this article, I analyze discourse and identity relations within so-called ‘conventional’ agri-food networks as well as how the conventional sphere perceives, constructs and responds to alternative food movements in Canada. The paper is structured around three primary research questions: How are conventional actors understanding conditions, changes, and challenges within conventional networks? How do conventional actors apply this understanding in advancing conventional interests and discourses, and defending conventional networks? How do conventional actors and discourse construct AFMs? For this research, I (...)
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  • Environmental Justice in the American South: An Analysis of Black Women Farmworkers in Apopka, Florida.Anne Saville & Alison E. Adams - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):193-204.
    Research has established that the burdens of externalities associated with industrial production are disproportionately borne by socially and politically vulnerable groups, and this is particularly true for farmworkers who are at high risk for environmental exposures and illnesses. The impacts of these risks are often compounded by farmworker communities’ social vulnerability. Yet, less is known about how the intersection of race, class, and gender can position some farmworkers to be at higher risk for particular types of oppressions. We extend the (...)
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  • How wage structure and crop size negatively impact farmworker livelihoods in monocrop organic production: interviews with strawberry harvesters in California.Rachel Soper - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (2):325-336.
    Because organic certification standards institutionalized a product-based rather than process-based definition, certified organic produce can be grown on large-scale industrial monocrop farms. Besides toxicity of inputs, these farms operate in much the same way as conventional production. Scholars emphasize the fact that labor rights have been left out of certification criteria, and because of that, organic farms reproduce the same labor relations as conventional. Empirical studies of organic farm labor, however, rely primarily on the perspective of farmers. In this study, (...)
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  • A New Era of Civil Rights? Latino Immigrant Farmers and Exclusion at the United States Department of Agriculture.Sea Sloat & Laura-Anne Minkoff-Zern - 2017 - Agriculture and Human Values 34 (3):631-643.
    In this article we investigate how Latino immigrant farmers in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States navigate United States Department of Agriculture programs, which necessitate standardizing farming practices and an acceptance of bureaucracy for participation. We show how Latino immigrant farmers’ agrarian norms and practices are at odds with the state’s requirement for agrarian standardization. This interview-based study builds on existing historical analyses of farmers of color in the United States, and the ways in which their farming practices and (...)
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  • Fast Food Sovereignty: Contradiction in Terms or Logical Next Step?Louis Thiemann & Antonio Roman-Alcalá - 2019 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 32 (5-6):813-834.
    The growing academic literature on ‘food sovereignty’ has elaborated a food producer-driven vision of an alternative, more ecological food system rooted in greater democratic control over food production and distribution. Given that the food sovereignty developed with and within producer associations, a rural setting and production-side concerns have overshadowed issues of distribution and urban consumption. Yet, ideal types such as direct marketing, time-intensive food preparation and the ‘family shared meal’ are hard to transcribe into the life realities in many non-rural, (...)
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  • Innovative Millennial Snails: The Story of Slow Food University of Wisconsin.Lydia Zepeda & Anna Reznickova - 2017 - Agriculture and Human Values 34 (1):167-178.
    This is the story of Slow Food University of Wisconsin, a student organization that grew from one woman’s idea to a community of over 3200 people dedicated to making sustainable, fairly produced, delicious food accessible in a small city, with a big university, in the heart of the United States. Along the way SFUW has fostered new ideas, developed skills, and built relationships through conscious food procurement, cooking and eating. This essay describes the evolution of the organization and its four (...)
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