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  1. Empathy, Social Media, and Directed Altruistic Living Organ Donation.Greg Moorlock & Heather Draper - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (5):289-297.
    In this article we explore some of the ethical dimensions of using social media to increase the number of living kidney donors. Social media provides a platform for changing non-identifiable ‘statistical victims’ into ‘real people’ with whom we can identify and feel empathy: the so-called ‘identifiable victim effect’, which prompts charitable action. We examine three approaches to promoting kidney donation using social media which could take advantages of the identifiable victim effect: institutionally organized campaigns based on historical cases aimed at (...)
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  • Elective Ventilation and the Politics of Death.Nathan Emmerich - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):153-157.
    This essay comments on the British Medical Association's recent suggestion that protocols for Elective Ventilation (EV) might be revived in order to increase the number of viable organs available for transplant. I suggest that the proposed revival results, at least in part, from developments in the contemporary political landscape, notably the decreasing likelihood of an opt-out system for the UK's Organ Donor Register. I go on to suggest that EV is unavoidably situated within complex debates surrounding the epistemology and ontology (...)
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  • Central Role of Alturism in the Recruitment of Gamete Donors.Guido Pennings - 2015 - Monash Bioethics Review 33 (1):78-88.
    This paper explores problems associated with using altruism as the central value in gamete donation, and in doing so draws on empirical data that sheds light on why gamete donors choose to donate. Donation of bodily material is, arguably, supposed to be motivated by altruism, and this is the view taken by many European governments. Other values are often ignored or rejected as morally inappropriate. This paper analyses some conceptual and practical problems with the use of altruism as the motivation (...)
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  • Contrasting Medical Technology with Deprivation and Social Vulnerability. Lessons for the Ethical Debate on Cloning and Organ Transplantation Through the Film Never Let Me Go.Solveig Lena Hansen & Sabine Wöhlke - 2016 - NanoEthics 10 (3):245-256.
    In the film Never Let Me Go, clones are forced to donate their organs anonymously. As a work of fiction, this film can be regarded as a negotiation of limited agency, since the clones are depicted as vulnerable individuals. Thereby, it evokes a confrontation with underprivileged positions in technocratic societies, encouraging the audience to take the perspective of the marginalised. The clones are situated in ‘privileged deprivation’; from the audience’s point of view, they are unable to evolve into autonomous agents—but (...)
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  • The Place for Religious Content in Clinical Ethics Consultations: A Reply to Janet Malek.Nicholas Colgrove & Kelly Kate Evans - 2019 - HEC Forum 31 (4):305-323.
    Janet Malek (91–102, 2019) argues that a “clinical ethics consultant’s religious worldview has no place in developing ethical recommendations or communicating about them with patients, surrogates, and clinicians.” She offers five types of arguments in support of this thesis: arguments from consensus, clarity, availability, consistency, and autonomy. This essay shows that there are serious problems for each of Malek’s arguments. None of them is sufficient to motivate her thesis. Thus, if it is true that the religious worldview of clinical ethics (...)
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  • Prosocial Personality Traits Differentially Predict Egalitarianism, Generosity, and Reciprocity in Economic Games.Kun Zhao, Eamonn Ferguson & Luke D. Smillie - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • How Altruistic Organ Donation May Be (Intrinsically) Bad.Ben Saunders - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (10):681-684.
    It has traditionally been assumed that organ donation must be altruistic, though the necessity of altruistic motivations has recently been questioned. Few, however, have questioned whether altruism is always a good motive. This paper considers the possibility that excessive altruism, or self-abnegation, may be intrinsically bad. How this may be so is illustrated with reference to Tom Hurka’s account of the value of attitudes, which suggests that disproportionate love of one’s own good—either excessive or deficient—is intrinsically bad. Whether or not (...)
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  • Directed Altruistic Living Donation: What is Wrong with the Beauty Contest?Greg Moorlock - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (11):875-879.
  • „Wir wissen es alle, nur sprechen wir es nie aus.“: Institutionalisierte Uninformiertheit als Bedingung von Vulnerabilität beim Klonen und Organspende in Never Let Me Go.Solveig Lena Hansen & Sabine Wöhlke - 2015 - Ethik in der Medizin 27 (1):23-34.
    ZusammenfassungIm Spielfilm Never Let Me Go werden Klone als vulnerable und heteronome Individuen dargestellt, die zur anonymen Organspende gezwungen werden. In diesem Beitrag wird die Darstellung dieser Figuren in ihrer individuellen Entwicklung und gesellschaftlichen Sozialisation unter der Frage untersucht, welche Bezüge sich zu bioethischen Aspekten ergeben. Die Klone befinden sich in einer Situation der „privilegierten Deprivation“: Aus Sicht der Zuschauer sind sie sozial benachteiligt und können sich nicht zu komplett autonomen Wesen entwickeln, aber aus ihrer eigenen Perspektive sind sie im (...)
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  • A Defense of Kidney Sales.Luke Bascome Semrau - unknown
    Drawing on empirical evidence in medicine, economics, law, and anthropology, I argue that a market is uniquely capable of meeting the demand for transplantable kidneys, and that it may be arranged so as to operate safely. The welfare gains, expected to accrue to both vendors and recipients, are sufficient to justify sales. Having spelled out the considerations recommending a kidney market, I address the most forceful objections facing the proposal. Despite its currency, the claim that incentives will crowd out altruistic (...)
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  • An ethical comparison of living kidney donation and surrogacy: understanding the relational dimension.Katharina Beier & Sabine Wöhlke - 2019 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 14 (1):1-9.
    BackgroundThe bioethical debates concerning living donation and surrogacy revolve around similar ethical questions and moral concepts. Nevertheless, the ethical discourses in both fields grew largely isolated from each other.MethodsBased on a review of ethical, sociological and anthropological research this paper aims to link the ethical discourses on living kidney donation and surrogacy by providing a comparative analysis of the two practices’ relational dimension with regard to three aspects, i.e. the normative role of relational dynamics, social norms and gender roles, and (...)
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  • Impact of Gender and Professional Education on Attitudes Towards Financial Incentives for Organ Donation: Results of a Survey Among 755 Students of Medicine and Economics in Germany.Julia Inthorn, Sabine Wöhlke, Fabian Schmidt & Silke Schicktanz - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):56.
    There is an ongoing expert debate with regard to financial incentives in order to increase organ supply. However, there is a lacuna of empirical studies on whether citizens would actually support financial incentives for organ donation.
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  • Lives and Choices, Give and Take: Altruism and Organ Procurement.Vicky Thornton - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):587-597.
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