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Dwellers in the Land: The Bioregional Vision

University of Georgia Press (1985)

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  1. Tensions and Dilemmas of Ecotopianism.David Pepper - 2007 - Environmental Values 16 (3):289 - 312.
    This paper examines some of many tensions associated with the Utopian propensity that underlies much thinking and action in radical environmentalism. They include the tensions inherent within ecotopianism's approach to social change, its desire to embrace ecological universals, its general propensity to face Janus-like in the direction of both modernity and post-modernity, and its tendency towards a polarised stance on scale, and local and global issues. These tensions create dilemmas that are not merely of academic interest: they have practical, tactical (...)
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  • The Troubled Marriage of Deep Ecology and Bioregionalism.Stewart Davidson - 2007 - Environmental Values 16 (3):313-332.
    Bioregionalism is often presented as the politics of deep ecology, or deep ecology 's social philosophy. That the ties uniting these doctrines are rarely explored can be put down to a perception amongst commentators that such links are self-evident and therefore unworthy of closer examination. By arguing that the bonds between deep ecology and bioregionalism are more tenuous than has often been assumed, this paper addresses this theoretical lacuna. There is nothing exclusive to the central tenets of deep ecology which (...)
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  • Educational Visions From Two Continents: What Tagore Adds to the Deweyan Perspective.Francis A. Samuel - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (10):1161-1174.
    In this global village, it is relevant to look at two educational visionaries from two continents, John Dewey and Rabindranath Tagore. Dewey observed that the modern individual was depersonalized by the industrial and commercial culture. He, thus, envisioned a new individual who would find fulfillment in maximum individuality within maximum community, which was embodied in his democratic concept and educational philosophy. Tagore's educational vision was based on India's traditional philosophy of harmony and fullness. It focused on self-realization within the context (...)
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  • Designing Post-Industrial Organizations for Ecological Sustainability.Ronald Purser - 1996 - World Futures 46 (4):203-222.
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  • Pride, Prejudice and Paranoia: Dismantling the Ideology of Domination.Ralph Metzner - 1998 - World Futures 51 (3):239-267.
    A comparison is made, pointing out the parallels, between five systems of domination?racism, sexism, classism, nationalism and speciesism (the human domination of nature). In each of these, one group of (human) beings asserts its superiority over another group and thereby seems to justify the domination, exploitation and abuse of the oppressed group. An analytical model is then presented that traces the psychological development of domination behavior through four stages: (1) perception of difference and group identification, (2) pride and self?affirmation, (3) (...)
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  • The Place of the Elements and the Elements of Place: Aristotelian Contributions to Environmental Thought.David Macauley - 2006 - Ethics, Place and Environment 9 (2):187 – 206.
    I examine the ancient and perennial notion of the elements (stoicheia) and its relation to an idea of place proper (topos) and natural place (topos oikeios) in Aristotle's work. Through an exploration of his accounts, I argue that Aristotle develops a robust theory of place that is relevant to current environmental and geographical thought. In the process, he provides a domestic household and home for earth, air, fire and water that offers a supplement or an alternative to more abstract and (...)
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  • The Bioregional Paradigm: Applications To STS Education.Cub Kahn - 1993 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 13 (3):125-127.
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  • Integral Ecology: The What, Who, and How of Environmental Phenomena.Sean Esbjörn-Hargens - 2005 - World Futures 61 (1 & 2):5 – 49.
    Providing an overview of Integral Ecology, this article defines and explains some of the key terms and concepts that underlie an approach to the environment that is inspired by and makes use of Ken Wilber's Integral Theory. First Integral Ecology is distinguished from other environmental approaches. Then Wilber's Integral Theory is introduced, which provides a foundation for a participatory approach to ecology. Next, the ontology, epistemology, and methodology of environmental phenomena is examined in light of Wilber's framework and illustrated with (...)
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  • Cultural Paradigms and Technological Literacy.Paul W. DeVore - 1987 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 7 (5-6):711-719.
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  • Cultural Paradigms and Technological Literacy.Paul W. DeVore - 1987 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 7 (3-4):711-719.
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  • Place and Civic Culture: Re-Thinking the Context for Local Agriculture. [REVIEW]Laura Delind & Jim Bingen - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (2):127-151.
    This article considers the qualitative concept of place – what it means, how it feels, how it is expressed, and how it is managed across time and space as the appropriate context within which to study and promote local agriculture and the locus of relationships, both cultural and political, that prefigure a local civic culture. It argues that civic as a description of local food and farming is conceptually and practically shallow in the absence of our ability to understand and (...)
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  • Democratizing Society and Food Systems: Or How Do We Transform Modern Structures of Power? [REVIEW]Kenneth A. Dahlberg - 2001 - Agriculture and Human Values 18 (2):135-151.
    The evolution of societies and food systems across the grand transitions is traced to show how nature and culture have been transformed along with the basic structures of power, politics, and governance. A central, but neglected, element has been the synergy between the creation of industrial institutions and the exponential, but unsustainable growth of the built environment. The values, goals, and strategies needed to transform and diversify these structures – generally and in terms of food and agriculture – are discussed (...)
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  • Murray Bookchin and the Domination of Nature.Giorel Curran - 1999 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (2):59-94.
    Bookchin's social ecology explores the narrative of domination and hierarchy. He argues that today's environmental crisis reflects a link between the human domination of nature and the domination of human by human. Hierarchy, as the pivot of such domination, is viewed as a psychology which permeates and corrodes not only social life (as reflected in class, gender, ethnic and other relations), but nature as well. Bookchin, seeking to replace hierarchy with cooperation by devolving power and autonomy to the individual in (...)
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  • Phenomenology, Habit, and Environmental Inaction.Victor Bruzzone & Peter R. Mulvihill - 2022 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 25 (2):178-193.
    Despite a growing literature on environmental inaction, it remains poorly understood. This article examines much of this literature including environmental ethics, policy studies, disaster theory,...
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  • Deep Ecological Science.Steve Breyman - 1998 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 18 (5):325-332.
    Deep ecology's biocentric philosophy rejects the anthropocentrism of mainstream environmentalism. Biocentrism holds that all life has inherent value and, as such, is worthy of respect and protection. Deep ecology's action strategy emerges from disgust with the compromises made by mainstream environmentalism. Deep ecologists tend toward confrontational actions such as blockades, “tree sits,” and “ecotage”. Earth First! in the United States, and Rainforest Action Network at the international level, are two well-known deep ecology groups. Bound together in a complex relationship, deep (...)
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  • An Epistemic Analysis of (Un)Sustainable Business.Frank Birkin & Thomas Polesie - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 103 (2):239-253.
    Michel Foucault famously analysed orders of knowledge, ‘epistemes’, in past European ages. In this study, his analytical method is fruitfully applied to gaining a better understanding of business sustainability within and beyond the Modern episteme. After an introduction to the contextual background for the study, this article provides (i) a justification for the use of a Foucauldian epistemic analytical method, (ii) an outline of the method, (iii) an application of the method to identify four sets of questions (morality, specialisation, anthropologization (...)
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  • Eco-Refuges as Anarchist’s Promised Land or the End of Dialectical Anarchism.Guido J. M. Verstraeten & Willem W. Verstraeten - 2014 - Asian Journal of Humanities and Social Studies 2 (6):781-788.
    Since the early Medieval Time people contested theological legitimation and rational discursive discours on authority as well as retreated to refuges to escape from any secular or ecclesiastical authority. Modern attempts formulated rational legitimation of authority in several ways: pragmatic authority by Monteigne, Bodin and Hobbes, or the contract authority of Locke and Rousseou. However, Enlightened Anarchism, first formulated in 1793 by the English philosopher William Godwin fulminated against all rational restrictions of human freedom and self-determination. However, we do not (...)
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