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  1. Seeing the Workers for the Trees: Exalted and Devalued Manual Labour in the Pacific Northwest Craft Cider Industry.Anelyse M. Weiler - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):65-78.
    Craft food and beverage makers regularly emphasize transparency about the ethical, sustainable sourcing of their ingredients and the human labour underpinning their production, all of which helps elevate the status of their products and occupational communities. Yet, as with other niche ethical consumption markets, craft industries continue to rely on employment conditions for agricultural workers that reproduce inequalities of race, class, and citizenship in the dominant food system. This paper interrogates the contradiction between the exaltation of craft cidermakers’ labour and (...)
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  • Food Labor, Economic Inequality, and the Imperfect Politics of Process in the Alternative Food Movement.Joshua Sbicca - 2015 - Agriculture and Human Values 32 (4):675-687.
    There is a growing commitment by different parts of the alternative food movement to improve labor conditions for conventional food chain workers, and to develop economically fair alternatives, albeit under a range of conditions that structure mobilization. This has direct implications for the process of intra-movement building and therefore the degree to which the movement ameliorates economic inequality at the point of food labor. This article asks what accounts for the variation in AFM labor commitments across different contexts. It then (...)
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  • Family Farming and Gendered Division of Labour on the Move: A Typology of Farming-Family Configurations.Jérémie Forney & Sandra Contzen - 2017 - Agriculture and Human Values 34 (1):27-40.
    Family farming, understood as a household which combines family, farm and commercial activity, still represents the backbone of the world’s agriculture. On family farms, labour division has generally been based on complementarity between persons of different gender and generations, resulting in specific male and female spheres and tasks. In this ‘traditional’ labour division, gender inequality is inherent as women are the unpaid and invisible labour force. Although this ‘traditional’ labour division still prevails through time and space, new arrangements have emerged. (...)
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  • Gender and Sustainable Livelihoods: Linking Gendered Experiences of Environment, Community and Self.Wendy Harcourt - 2017 - Agriculture and Human Values 34 (4):1007-1019.
    In this essay I explore the economic, social, environmental and cultural changes taking place in Bolsena, Italy, where agricultural livelihoods have rapidly diminished in the last two decades. I examine how gender dynamics have shifted with the changing values and livelihoods of Bolsena through three women’s narratives detailing their gendered experiences of environment, community and self. I reflect on these changes with Sabrina, who is engaged in a feminist community-based organization; Anna, who is running an alternative wine bar; and Isabella, (...)
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  • Pushing Beyond Boundaries as a Pre-Tenure Rural Sociologist Who is Not From Around Here.Florence A. Becot - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):615-619.
    In her 2020 Agriculture, Food and Human Values Society presidential address, Molly Anderson outlined three ways to push beyond boundaries imposed on us and by us to work towards addressing global food system and societal problems. In this response essay, I draw on my experiences and my perspectives as a pre-tenure rural sociologist who is not from around here to highlight how I attempt to push beyond boundaries in my own work and to discuss challenges associated with the feasibility of (...)
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  • Images of Work, Images of Defiance: Engaging Migrant Farm Worker Voice Through Community-Based Arts.J. Adam Perry - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):627-640.
    This article addresses a stated need within the food justice movement scholarship to increase the attention paid to the political socialization of hired farm hands in industrial agriculture. In Canada, tackling the problem of farm worker equity has particular social and political contours related to the Canadian horticultural industry’s reliance on a state-managed migrant agricultural labour program designed to fill the sector’s labour market demands. As Canada’s Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program produces relations of ‘unfree labour’, engaging migrant farm workers in (...)
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  • Will Work for Food: Agricultural Interns, Apprentices, Volunteers, and the Agrarian Question.Michael Ekers, Charles Z. Levkoe, Samuel Walker & Bryan Dale - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (3):705-720.
    Recently, growing numbers of interns, apprentices, and volunteers are being recruited to work seasonally on ecologically oriented and organic farms across the global north. To date, there has been very little research examining these emergent forms of non-waged work. In this paper, we analyze the relationships between non-waged agricultural work and the economic circumstances of small- to medium-size farms and the non-economic ambitions of farm operators. We do so through a quantitative and qualitative analysis of farmers’ responses to two surveys (...)
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  • Farm Size and Job Quality: Mixed-Methods Studies of Hired Farm Work in California and Wisconsin.Jill Lindsey Harrison & Christy Getz - 2015 - Agriculture and Human Values 32 (4):617-634.
    Agrifood scholars have long investigated the relationship between farm size and a wide variety of social and ecological outcomes. Yet neither this scholarship nor the extensive research on farmworkers has addressed the relationship between farm size and job quality for hired workers. Moreover, although this question has not been systematically investigated, many advocates, popular food writers, and documentaries appear to have the answer—portraying precarious work as common on large farms and nonexistent on small farms. In this paper, we take on (...)
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