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  1. Affective Neuronal Selection: The Nature of the Primordial Emotion Systems.Judith A. Toronchuk & George F. R. Ellis - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  • Proximal Foundations of Jealousy: Expectations of Exclusivity in the Infant’s First Year of Life.Sybil L. Hart - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (4):358-366.
    In this synthesis, we summarize studies that yielded evidence of jealousy in young infants. To shed light on this phenomenon, we present evidence that jealousy’s foundation rests on history of dyadic interactions with caregivers which engender infants’ expectations of exclusivity, and on maturation of sociocognitive capacities that enable infants to evaluate whether an exchange between their caregiver and another child represents a violation of that expectation. We conclude with a call for greater study of the antecedents and sequelae of both (...)
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  • Common Denominators in Research on Emotion Language: A Postscript.Anna Ogarkova & Philippe Borgeaud - 2009 - Social Science Information 48 (3):523-543.
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  • The Somatic Appraisal Model of Affect: Paradigm for Educational Neuroscience and Neuropedagogy.Kathryn E. Patten - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):87-97.
    This chapter presents emotion as a function of brain-body interaction, as a vital part of a multi-tiered phylogenetic set of neural mechanisms, evoked by both instinctive processes and learned appraisal systems, and argues to establish the primacy of emotion in relation to cognition. Primarily based on Damasio's somatic marker hypothesis, but also incorporating elements of Lazarus' appraisal theory, this paper presents a neuropedagogical model of emotion, the somatic appraisal model of affect (SAMA). SAMA identifies quintessential components, facets, and functions of (...)
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  • A Philosophical Critique of Psychological Studies of Emotion: The Example of Jealousy.Kristján Kristjánsson - 2016 - Philosophical Explorations 19 (3):238-251.
    The aim of this article is to provide a critical review of recent writings about jealousy in psychology, as seen from a philosophical perspective. At a more general level of inquiry, jealousy offers a useful lens through which to study generic issues concerned with the conceptual and moral nature of emotions, as well as the contributions that philosophers and social scientists can make to understanding them. Hence, considerable space is devoted to comparisons of psychological and philosophical approaches to emotion research (...)
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  • Beyond Emotion: Love as an Encounter of Myth and Drive.Lubomir Lamy - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (2):97-107.
    Starting with a review of research on love as an emotion, with an emphasis on romantic love, it is argued that despite strong emotional correlates evidence is lacking to conclude that love would meet the criteria of basic emotions. Theoretical developments are proposed where love is conceived of as a combination of an objectless drive, a desire for love, and a mythical and scripted representation that offers the possibility of labeling the current core affect. I argue that the basic motive (...)
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  • Sincerity Is in the Eye of the Beholder: Using Eye Tracking to Understand How Victims Interpret an Offender’s Apology in a Simulation of Victim–Offender Mediation.Florian Bonensteffen, Sven Zebel & Ellen Giebels - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  • The Part-Whole Perception of Emotion.Trip Glazer - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 58:34-43.
    A clever argument purports to show that we can directly perceive the emotions of others: (1) some emotional expressions are parts of the emotions they express; (2) perceiving a part of something is sufficient for perceiving the whole; (3) therefore, perceiving some emotional expressions is sufficient for perceiving the emotions they express. My aim in this paper is to assess the extent to which contemporary psychological theories of emotion support the first premise of this argument.
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