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  1. Disentangling the Role of Deviant Letter Position on Cognate Word Processing.Montserrat Comesaña, Juan Haro, Pedro Macizo & Pilar Ferré - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    The way of coding letter position has been extensively assessed during the recognition of native words, leading to the development of a new generation of models that assume more flexible letter position coding schemes compared to classical computational models such as the interactive activation model. However, determining whether similar letter position encoding mechanisms occur during the bilingual word recognition has been largely less explored despite its implications for the leading model of bilingual word recognition as it assumes the input-coding scheme (...)
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  • On the Proper Treatment of Thermostats.David S. Touretzky - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):55-56.
    A set of hypotheses is formulated for a connectionist approach to cognitive modeling. These hypotheses are shown to be incompatible with the hypotheses underlying traditional cognitive models. The connectionist models considered are massively parallel numerical computational systems that are a kind of continuous dynamical system. The numerical variables in the system correspond semantically to fine-grained features below the level of the concepts consciously used to describe the task domain. The level of analysis is intermediate between those of symbolic cognitive models (...)
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  • Connectionist Natural Language Processing: The State of the Art.Morten H. Christiansen & Nick Chater - 1999 - Cognitive Science 23 (4):417-437.
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  • Modularity Need Not Imply Locality: Damaged Modules Can Have Nonlocal Effects.Edgar Zurif & David Swinney - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (1):89-90.
  • Parallel Distributed Processing Challenges the Strong Modularity Hypothesis, Not the Locality Assumption.David C. Plaut - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (1):77-78.
  • Distributed Memory and the Representation of General and Specific Information.James L. McClelland & David E. Rumelhart - 1985 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 114 (2):159-188.
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  • Positive Feedback in Hierarchical Connectionist Models: Applications to Language Production.Gary S. Dell - 1985 - Cognitive Science 9 (1):3-23.
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  • Putting Knowledge in its Place: A Scheme for Programming Parallel Processing Structures on the Fly.James L. McClelland - 1985 - Cognitive Science 9 (1):113-146.
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  • Feature Discovery by Competitive Learning.David E. Rumelhart & David Zipser - 1985 - Cognitive Science 9 (1):75-112.
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  • The Place of Modeling in Cognitive Science.James L. McClelland - 2009 - Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (1):11-38.
  • A Developmental Neural Model of Visual Word Perception.Richard M. Golden - 1986 - Cognitive Science 10 (3):241-276.
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  • Discrimination Nets as Psychological Models.Lawrence W. Barsalou & Gordon H. Bower - 1984 - Cognitive Science 8 (1):1-26.
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  • EPAM‐Like Models of Recognition and Learning.Edward A. Feigenbaum & Herbert A. Simon - 1984 - Cognitive Science 8 (4):305-336.
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  • Criteria for the Design and Evaluation of Cognitive Architectures.Sashank Varma - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (7):1329-1351.
    Cognitive architectures are unified theories of cognition that take the form of computational formalisms. They support computational models that collectively account for large numbers of empirical regularities using small numbers of computational mechanisms. Empirical coverage and parsimony are the most prominent criteria by which architectures are designed and evaluated, but they are not the only ones. This paper considers three additional criteria that have been comparatively undertheorized. (a) Successful architectures possess subjective and intersubjective meaning, making cognition comprehensible to individual cognitive (...)
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  • TSUNAMI: Simultaneous Understanding, Answering, and Memory Interaction for Questions.Scott P. Robertson - 1994 - Cognitive Science 18 (1):51-85.
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  • Competitive Learning: From Interactive Activation to Adaptive Resonance.Stephen Grossberg - 1987 - Cognitive Science 11 (1):23-63.
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  • Perspectives on Modeling in Cognitive Science.Richard M. Shiffrin - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):736-750.
    This commentary gives a personal perspective on modeling and modeling developments in cognitive science, starting in the 1950s, but focusing on the author’s personal views of modeling since training in the late 1960s, and particularly focusing on advances since the official founding of the Cognitive Science Society. The range and variety of modeling approaches in use today are remarkable, and for many, bewildering. Yet to come to anything approaching adequate insights into the infinitely complex fields of mind, brain, and intelligent (...)
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  • Radical Connectionism.Robert C. Cummins & Georg Schwarz - 1987 - Southern Journal of Philosophy Supplement 26 (S1):43-61.
  • Interactive Activation and Mutual Constraint Satisfaction in Perception and Cognition.James L. McClelland, Daniel Mirman, Donald J. Bolger & Pranav Khaitan - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (6):1139-1189.
    In a seminal 1977 article, Rumelhart argued that perception required the simultaneous use of multiple sources of information, allowing perceivers to optimally interpret sensory information at many levels of representation in real time as information arrives. Building on Rumelhart's arguments, we present the Interactive Activation hypothesis—the idea that the mechanism used in perception and comprehension to achieve these feats exploits an interactive activation process implemented through the bidirectional propagation of activation among simple processing units. We then examine the interactive activation (...)
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  • Optimization and Quantization in Gradient Symbol Systems: A Framework for Integrating the Continuous and the Discrete in Cognition.Paul Smolensky, Matthew Goldrick & Donald Mathis - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (6):1102-1138.
    Mental representations have continuous as well as discrete, combinatorial properties. For example, while predominantly discrete, phonological representations also vary continuously; this is reflected by gradient effects in instrumental studies of speech production. Can an integrated theoretical framework address both aspects of structure? The framework we introduce here, Gradient Symbol Processing, characterizes the emergence of grammatical macrostructure from the Parallel Distributed Processing microstructure (McClelland, Rumelhart, & The PDP Research Group, 1986) of language processing. The mental representations that emerge, Distributed Symbol Systems, (...)
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  • Levels Indeed! A Response to Broadbent.David E. Rumelhart & James L. McClelland - 1985 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 114 (2):193-197.
  • 2. Information Processing Systems Which Embody Computational Rules: The Connectionist Approach.Glyn W. Humphreys - 1986 - Mind and Language 1 (3):201-12.
  • Neural Facades: Visual Representations of Static and Moving Form‐And‐Color‐And‐Depth.Stephen Grossberg - 1990 - Mind and Language 5 (4):411-456.
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  • Does Perceptual Consciousness Overflow Cognitive Access? The Challenge From Probabilistic, Hierarchical Processes.Steven Gross & Jonathan Flombaum - 2017 - Mind and Language 32 (3):358-391.
    Does perceptual consciousness require cognitive access? Ned Block argues that it does not. Central to his case are visual memory experiments that employ post-stimulus cueing—in particular, Sperling's classic partial report studies, change-detection work by Lamme and colleagues, and a recent paper by Bronfman and colleagues that exploits our perception of ‘gist’ properties. We argue contra Block that these experiments do not support his claim. Our reinterpretations differ from previous critics' in challenging as well a longstanding and common view of visual (...)
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  • Bringing Together Some Old and New Concerns About Dual-Route Theory.David A. Balota - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):705-706.
  • Unconscious Semantic Processing: The Pendulum Keeps on Swinging.David A. Balota - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):23-24.
  • Context-Sensitive Inference, Modularity, and the Assumption of Formal Processing.Mitch Parsell - 2005 - Philosophical Psychology 18 (1):45-58.
    Performance on the Wason selection task varies with content. This has been taken to demonstrate that there are different cognitive modules for dealing with different conceptual domains. This implication is only legitimate if our underlying cognitive architecture is formal. A non-formal system can explain content-sensitive inference without appeal to independent inferential modules.
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  • Radical Connectionism1.Robert Cummins & Georg Schwarz - 1988 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 26 (S1):43-61.
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  • Connectionism and Interlevel Relations.William Bechtel - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):24-25.
  • Ockham's Razor at Work: Modeling of the ``Homunculus''. [REVIEW]András Lörincz, Barnabás Póczos, Gábor Szirtes & Bálint Takács - 2002 - Brain and Mind 3 (2):187-220.
    There is a broad consensus about the fundamental role of thehippocampal system (hippocampus and its adjacent areas) in theencoding and retrieval of episodic memories. This paper presents afunctional model of this system. Although memory is not asingle-unit cognitive function, we took the view that the wholesystem of the smooth, interrelated memory processes may have acommon basis. That is why we follow the Ockham's razor principleand minimize the size or complexity of our model assumption set.The fundamental assumption is the requirement of (...)
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  • Representations Without Rules, Connectionism and the Syntactic Argument.Kenneth Aizawa - 1994 - Synthese 101 (3):465-92.
    Terry Horgan and John Tienson have suggested that connectionism might provide a framework within which to articulate a theory of cognition according to which there are mental representations without rules (RWR) (Horgan and Tienson 1988, 1989, 1991, 1992). In essence, RWR states that cognition involves representations in a language of thought, but that these representations are not manipulated by the sort of rules that have traditionally been posited. In the development of RWR, Horgan and Tienson attempt to forestall a particular (...)
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  • Neuropsychological Inference with an Interactive Brain: A Critique of the “Locality” Assumption.Martha J. Farah - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (1):43-61.
    When cognitive neuropsychologists make inferences about the functional architecture of the normal mind from selective cognitive impairments they generally assume that the effects of brain damage are local, that is, that the nondamaged components of the architecture continue to function as they did before the damage. This assumption follows from the view that the components of the functional architecture are modular, in the sense of being informationally encapsulated. In this target article it is argued that this “locality” assumption is probably (...)
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  • The Word Composite Effect Depends on Abstract Lexical Representations But Not Surface Features Like Case and Font.Paulo Ventura, Tânia Fernandes, Isabel Leite, Vítor B. Almeida, Inês Casqueiro & Alan C.-N. Wong - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • The Processing of Visual and Phonological Configurations of Chinese One- and Two-Character Words in a Priming Task of Semantic Categorization.Bosen Ma, Xiaoyun Wang & Degao Li - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Developmental Differences in Masked Form Priming Are Not Driven by Vocabulary Growth.Adeetee Bhide, Bradley L. Schlaggar & Kelly Anne Barnes - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  • Shortlist: A Connectionist Model of Continuous Speech Recognition.Dennis Norris - 1994 - Cognition 52 (3):189-234.
  • Sentence-in-Noise Perception in Monolinguals and Multilinguals: The Effect of Contextual Meaning, and Linguistic and Cognitive Load.Charles Massingham - 2018 - Dissertation, Durham University
    This study proposes a framework by which grammatically and syntactically sound sentences are classified through the perceptual measurement in noise of multilinguals and monolinguals, using an objective measure called SPERI and an interpretivist measure called SPIn, with results evaluated using Shortlist models and the BLINCS model. Hereby filling a knowledge gap on the perception of sentences that combine in varying levels of contextual meaning, linguistic load and cognitive load, this study used sentence clustering methods to find limitations of the proposed (...)
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  • Functional Parallelism in Spoken Word-Recognition.William D. Marslen-Wilson - 1987 - Cognition 25 (1-2):71-102.
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  • Towards a Universal Model of Reading.Ram Frost, Christina Behme, Madeleine El Beveridge, Thomas H. Bak, Jeffrey S. Bowers, Max Coltheart, Stephen Crain, Colin J. Davis, S. Hélène Deacon & Laurie Beth Feldman - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (5):263.
    In the last decade, reading research has seen a paradigmatic shift. A new wave of computational models of orthographic processing that offer various forms of noisy position or context-sensitive coding have revolutionized the field of visual word recognition. The influx of such models stems mainly from consistent findings, coming mostly from European languages, regarding an apparent insensitivity of skilled readers to letter order. Underlying the current revolution is the theoretical assumption that the insensitivity of readers to letter order reflects the (...)
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  • A Theory of Interactive Parallel Processing: New Capacity Measures and Predictions for a Response Time Inequality Series.James T. Townsend & Michael J. Wenger - 2004 - Psychological Review 111 (4):1003-1035.
  • On the Proper Treatment of Connectionism.Paul Smolensky - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):1-23.
    A set of hypotheses is formulated for a connectionist approach to cognitive modeling. These hypotheses are shown to be incompatible with the hypotheses underlying traditional cognitive models. The connectionist models considered are massively parallel numerical computational systems that are a kind of continuous dynamical system. The numerical variables in the system correspond semantically to fine-grained features below the level of the concepts consciously used to describe the task domain. The level of analysis is intermediate between those of symbolic cognitive models (...)
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  • Putting Together Connectionism – Again.Paul Smolensky - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):59-74.
    A set of hypotheses is formulated for a connectionist approach to cognitive modeling. These hypotheses are shown to be incompatible with the hypotheses underlying traditional cognitive models. The connectionist models considered are massively parallel numerical computational systems that are a kind of continuous dynamical system. The numerical variables in the system correspond semantically to fine-grained features below the level of the concepts consciously used to describe the task domain. The level of analysis is intermediate between those of symbolic cognitive models (...)
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  • Beyond Respondent Conditioning.Sibylle Klosterhalfen & Wolfgang Klosterhalfen - 1989 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (1):149-150.
  • A Promising New Strategy for Studying Conditioned Immunomodulation.Wolfgang Klosterhalfen - 1989 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (1):150-150.
  • Mis-Representations.J. Bruce Overmier - 1989 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (1):156-157.
  • Classical Conditioning: The New Hegemony.Jaylan Sheila Turkkan - 1989 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (1):121-137.
    Converging data from different disciplines are showing the role of classical conditioning processes in the elaboration of human and animal behavior to be larger than previously supposed. Restricted views of classically conditioned responses as merely secretory, reflexive, or emotional are giving way to a broader conception that includes problem-solving, and other rule-governed behavior thought to be the exclusive province of either operant conditiońing or cognitive psychology. These new views have been accompanied by changes in the way conditioning is conducted and (...)
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  • Interactions on the Interactive Brain.Martha J. Farah - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (1):90-104.
    When cognitive neuropsychologists make inferences about the functional architecture of the normal mind from selective cognitive impairments they generally assume that the effects of brain damage are local, that is, that the nondamaged components of the architecture continue to function as they did before the damage. This assumption follows from the view that the components of the functional architecture are modular, in the sense of being informationally encapsulated. In this target article it is argued that this “locality” assumption is probably (...)
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  • A Ballistic Model of Choice Response Time.Scott Brown & Andrew Heathcote - 2005 - Psychological Review 112 (1):117-128.
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  • Book Review. [REVIEW]Mitch Parsell - 2005 - Minds and Machines 15 (3-4):445-451.