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  1. Localizations of Dystopia.Robert Rosenberger - 2021 - Foundations of Science 27 (2):709-715.
    The postphenomenological framework of concepts—and especially the version utilized by the founder of this school of thought, Don Ihde—has proven useful for puncturing others’ totalizing or otherwise overgeneralizing claims about technology. However, does this specialization in deflating hype leave this perspective unable to identify the kinds of technological patterns necessary for contributing to activist interventions and political critique? Put differently, the postphenomenological perspective is committed to the study of concrete human-technology relations, and it eschews essentialist and fundamentalizing accounts of technology. (...)
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  • Play in the Information Age.Miguel Sicart - 2019 - Philosophy and Technology 32 (3):517-534.
    This article is an inquiry on the role of play in shaping the cultures of the Information Age. By applying concepts from Postphenomenology and the Philosophy of Information, this paper argues that play and computation share a capacity to shape human experience. I will apply the concept of re-ontologization to describe the effect that computation has had in shaping the world. I will apply the concept of relational strategies to argue that play is a way of interfacing with the computational (...)
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  • Multistability and the Agency of Mundane Artifacts: From Speed Bumps to Subway Benches.Robert Rosenberger - 2014 - Human Studies 37 (3):369-392.
    A central question in philosophical and sociological accounts of technology is how the agency of technologies should be conceived, that is, how to understand their constitutive roles in the actions performed by assemblages of humans and artifacts. To address this question, I build on the suggestion that a helpful perspective can be gained by amalgamating “actor-network theory” and “postphenomenological” accounts. The idea is that only a combined account can confront both the nuances of human experiential relationships with technology on which (...)
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  • Beyond the rhetoric of tech addiction: why we should be discussing tech habits instead.Jesper Aagaard - 2020 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 20 (3):559-572.
    In the past few years, we have become increasingly focused on technology use that is impulsive, unthinking, and distractive. There has been a strong push to understand such technology use in terms of dopamine addiction. The present article demonstrates the limitations of this so-called neurobehaviorist approach: Not only is it inconsistent in regard to how it understands humans, technologies, and their mutual relationship, it also pathologizes everyday human behaviors. The article proceeds to discuss dual-systems theory, which helpfully discusses impulsive technology (...)
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  • Ethics and Aesthetics of Technologies.Arun Kumar Tripathi - 2010 - AI and Society 25 (1):5-9.
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  • Transparent Media and the Development of Digital Habits.Daniel Susser - 2017 - In Yoni Van den Eede, Stacy O'Neal Irwin & Galit Wellner (eds.), Postphenomenology and Media: Essays on Human-Media-World Relations. New York: Lexington Books. pp. 27-44.
    Our lives are guided by habits. Most of the activities we engage in throughout the day are initiated and carried out not by rational thought and deliberation, but through an ingrained set of dispositions or patterns of action—what Aristotle calls a hexis. We develop these dispositions over time, by acting and gauging how the world responds. I tilt the steering wheel too far and the car’s lurch teaches me how much force is needed to steady it. I come too close (...)
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  • Dissection and Simulation: Brilliance and Transparency, or Encumbrance and Disruption?Norm Friesen - 2011 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 15 (3):185-200.
    The increasing use of online simulations as replacements for animal dissection in the classroom or lab raises important questions about the nature of simulation itself and its relationship to embodied educational experience. This paper addresses these questions first by presenting a comparative hermeneutic-phenomenological investigation of online and offline dissection. It then interprets the results of this study in terms of Borgmann’s notion of the intentional “transparency” and “pliability” of simulated hyperreality. It makes the case that it is precisely encumbrance and (...)
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  • The Spatial Experience of Telephone Use.Robert Rosenberger - 2010 - Environment, Space, Place 2 (2):63-77.
    Ideas developed within the philosophical tradition of phenomenology can be used to describe the experience of talking on the phone. In particular, I build on a contemporary brand of phenomenology called “postphenomenology,” a school of thought which specializes in the analysis of the relationships that form between users and technologies. Three central concepts are reviewed and developed: transparency, sedimentation, and what I call “field composition.” These concepts can be used for the description of the way that the content of a (...)
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  • On Variational Cross-Examination: A Method for Postphenomenological Multistability.Robert Rosenberger - forthcoming - AI and Society.
    How should we understand postphenomenological methodology? Postphenomenology is a research perspective which builds on phenomenological and pragmatist philosophy to explore human–technology relations, but one with open methodological questions. Here, I offer some thoughts on the epistemological processes that should be at work in this research. In particular, I am concerned with postphenomenological research on technological “multistability,” i.e., a device’s ever-present capacity to be used for a variety of purposes, and to always be meaningful in multiple ways. I develop a methodology (...)
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  • The Importance of Generalized Bodily Habits for a Future World of Ubiquitous Computing.Robert Rosenberger - 2013 - AI and Society 28 (3):289-296.
    In a future world of ubiquitous computing, in which humans interact with computerized technologies even more frequently and in even more situations than today, interface design will have increased importance. One feature of interface that I argue will be especially relevant is what I call abstract relational strategies. This refers to an approach (in both a bodily and conceptual sense) toward the use of a technology, an approach that is general enough to be applied in many different concrete scenarios. Such (...)
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  • On the Hermeneutics of Everyday Things: Or, the Philosophy of Fire Hydrants.Rosenberger Robert - 2017 - AI and Society 32 (2):233-241.
  • Deflating the Overblown Accounts of Technology: A Review of Don Ihde’s Ironic Technics. [REVIEW]Robert Rosenberger - 2010 - AI and Society 25 (1):133-136.
  • Culture of Sedimentation in the Human–Technology Interaction.Arun Kumar Tripathi - 2016 - AI and Society 31 (2):233-242.