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Plato's Sophist the Drama of Original and Image

Yale University Press (1983)

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  1. From Intermediates Through Eidetic Numbers: Plato on the Limits of Counting.Andy German - 2018 - Plato Journal 18:111-124.
    Many have argued that Plato’s intermediates are not independent entities. Rather, they exemplify the incapacity of discursive thought to cognizing Forms. But just what does this incapacity consist in? Any successful answer will require going beyond the intermediates themselves to another aspect of Plato’s mathematical thought - his attribution of a quasi-numerical structure to Forms. For our purposes, the most penetrating account of eidetic numbers is Jacob Klein’s, who saw clearly that eidetic numbers are part of Plato’s inquiry into the (...)
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  • The Groundwork for Dialectic in Statesman 277a-287b.Colin C. Smith - 2018 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 12 (2):132-150.
    In Plato’s Statesman, the Eleatic Stranger leads Socrates the Younger and their audience through an analysis of the statesman in the service of the interlocutors’ becoming “more capable in dialectic regarding all things”. In this way, the dialectical exercise in the text is both intrinsically and instrumentally valuable, as it yields a philosophically rigorous account of statesmanship and exhibits a method of dialectical inquiry. After the series of bifurcatory divisions in the Sophist and early Statesman, the Stranger changes to a (...)
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  • Philebus.Verity Harte - 2012 - In Gerald Press (ed.), The Continuum Companion to Plato. pp. 81-83.
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  • Science de l’entrelacement des formes, science suprême, science des hommes libres : la dialectique dans le Sophiste 253b-254b.Nicolas Zaks - 2017 - Elenchos 38 (1-2):61-81.
    Despite intensive exegetical work, Plato’s description of dialectic in the Sophist still raises many questions. Through a close reading of this passage that contextualizes it in the general organisation of the Sophist, this paper provides answers to these questions. After presenting the difficult text, I contend that the “vowel-kinds” are necessary conditions for the blending of kinds. Then, I interpret the “cause of divisions” mentioned by the Stranger as the kinds responsible of the dichotomous division in the first half of (...)
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  • The Science of Philosophy: Discourse and Deception in Plato’s Sophist.Pettersson Olof - 2018 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):221-237.
    At 252e1 to 253c9 in Plato’s Sophist, the Eleatic Visitor explains why philosophy is a science. Like the art of grammar, philosophical knowledge corresponds to a generic structure of discrete kinds and is acquired by systematic analysis of how these kinds intermingle. In the literature, the Visitor’s science is either understood as an expression of a mature and authentic platonic metaphysics, or as a sophisticated illusion staged to illustrate the seductive lure of sophistic deception. By showing how the Visitor’s account (...)
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  • Plato and Peirce on Likeness and Semblance.Han-Liang Chang - 2012 - Biosemiotics 5 (3):301-312.
    In his well-known essay, ‘What Is a Sign?’ (CP 2.281, 285) Peirce uses ‘likeness’ and ‘resemblance’ interchangeably in his definition of icon. The synonymity of the two words has rarely, if ever, been questioned. Curiously, a locus classicus of the pair, at least in F. M. Cornford’s English translation, can be found in a late dialogue of Plato, namely, the Sophist. In this dialogue on the myth and truth of the sophists’ profession, the mysterious ‘stranger’, who is most likely Socrates’ (...)
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  • The Search for the King: Reflexive Irony in Plato's Politicus.Ann N. Michelini - 2000 - Classical Antiquity 19 (1):180-204.
    Platonic dialogues are self-concealing, presenting ideas by indirection or in riddling form, often exploring a difficulty or aporia without arriving at a solution. Since philosophers have begun to see Plato's work as imbued with irony, double meaning, and ambiguity, literary techniques that accommodate such layered meanings become a necessary adjunct to interpretation. The dialogue Politicus explores through an aporetic process a central Platonic concern, the relation between ideal and real. Close analysis of the important section dealing with law and constitutions (...)
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  • Tópicos Para Uma Leitura de O Sofista.Jayme Paviani - 1997 - Veritas – Revista de Filosofia da Pucrs 42 (4):937.
    Indicação de tópicos do prólogo de o Sofista considerados relevantes, sob o ponto de vista propedêutico, para o estudo do diálogo na perspectiva do processo diairético. Observações sobre as implicações entre o método, os temas e a estrutura do diálogo.
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  • Heidegger’s Ontic Relatedness: Pros Ti and Mitsein.Laura Candiotto - 2016 - Revista de Filosofia Aurora 28 (43):313.
    Relational structure is a primitive notion of Heidegger’s Dasein. By analyzing the concept of pros-ti as it emerges from the Heidegger’s 1924 course dedicated to Plato’s Sophist, I outline the Platonic and Aristotelic roots of Heideggerian Mitsein. Arguably the Mitsein makes explicit the instances of the pros ti — in other words, the instances of Aristotle’s concept of relatedness/intentionality that Heidegger ascribes to Plato’s heteron — but giving them an existential value, having Heidegger pursued the shift from realism to phenomenologyexistentialism. (...)
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