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  1. All animals are equal, but …: management perceptions of stakeholder relationships and societal responsibilities in multinational corporations.Esben Rahbek Gjerdrum Pedersen - 2011 - Business Ethics 20 (2):177-191.
    The stakeholder approach has become a popular perspective in mainstream management and the corporate social responsibility (CSR) literature. However, it remains an open question as to how real-life managers actually view stakeholders and what rationales and logics are used for explaining the relationship between the firm and its constituencies. This article examines whom managers in multinational corporations (MNCs) consider to be their important stakeholders, and how they describe the societal responsibilities towards these groups and individuals. It is concluded that managers (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility: Views from the Frontline.Lisa Whitehouse - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 63 (3):279-296.
    This paper offers an evaluation of corporate policy and practice in respect of corporate social responsibility (CSR) deriving from an analysis of qualitative data, obtained during semi-structured interviews with the representatives of 16 companies from a variety of UK sectors including retail, mining, financial services and mobile telephony. The findings of the empirical survey are presented in five sections that trace chronologically the process of CSR policy development. The first identifies the meaning attributed to CSR by the respondent companies followed (...)
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  • Exploring the Nature of the Relationship Between CSR and Competitiveness.Marc Vilanova, Josep Maria Lozano & Daniel Arenas - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (S1):57-69.
    This paper explores the nature of the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and competitiveness. We start with the commonly held view that firm competitiveness is defined by the market. That is, the question of what are the critical competitiveness factors is answered by looking at how companies and financial analysts describe and evaluate a firm. To analyze this, we review the current state of the art on the relationship between CSR and competitiveness. Second, CSR criteria used by financial analysts (...)
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  • Voluntary social disclosures by large UK companies.Stephen Brammer & Stephen Pavelin - 2004 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 13 (2-3):86-99.
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  • Corporate social responsibility in the 21st century: A view from the world's most successful firms.Jamie Snider, Ronald Paul Hill & Diane Martin - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 48 (2):175-187.
    This investigation is motivated by the lack of scholarship examining the content of what firms are communicating to various stakeholders about their commitment to socially responsible behaviors. To address this query, a qualitative study of the legal, ethical and moral statements available on the websites of Forbes Magazine''s top 50 U.S. and top 50 multinational firms of non-U.S. origin were analyzed within the context of stakeholder theory. The results are presented thematically, and the close provides implications for social responsibility among (...)
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  • CSR and Related Terms in SME Owner–Managers’ Mental Models in Six European Countries: National Context Matters.Hans-Jörg Schlierer, Heidi Weltzien Hoivik, Elisabet Garriga, Silvana Signori, Annick Rossem, Andrea Werner & Yves Fassin - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (2):433-456.
    As a contribution to the emerging field of corporate social responsibility cognition, this article reports on the findings of an exploratory study that compares SME owner–managers’ mental models with regard to CSR and related concepts across six European countries. Utilising Repertory Grid Technique, we found that the SME owner–managers’ mental models show a few commonalities as well as a number of differences across the different country samples. We interpret those differences by linking individual cognition to macro-environmental variables, such as language, (...)
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  • Give or take on the internet: An examinationof the disclosure practices of insurance firm web innovators. [REVIEW]Dennis M. Patten - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 36 (3):247 - 259.
    Theories of corporate social responsibility suggest that there ought to be a balance between what business takes from society and what it gives back in return. Recently, the practice literature within the insurance industry has been heavily pushing for the development of the Internet as a tool for commerce while virtually ignoring the role it could play in terms of information disclosure to stakeholders. This study examines whether insurance firms themselves reflect this emphasis, or whether companies that are industry leaders (...)
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  • Corporate Philanthropy as a Context for Moral Agency, a MacIntyrean Enquiry.Helen Nicholson, Ron Beadle & Richard Slack - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 167 (3):589-603.
    It has been claimed that ‘virtuous structures’ can foster moral agency in organisations. We investigate this in the context of employee involvement in corporate philanthropy, an activity whose moral status has been disputed. Employing Alasdair MacIntyre’s account of moral agency, we analyse the results of eight focus groups with employees engaged in corporate philanthropy in an employee-owned retailer, the John Lewis Partnership. Within this organisational context, Employee–Partners’ moral agency was evidenced in narrative accounts of their engagement in philanthropic activities and (...)
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  • What Do Stakeholders Care About? Investigating Corporate Social and Environmental Disclosure in China.Yingjun Lu & Indra Abeysekera - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 144 (1):169-184.
    This study investigates the social and environmental disclosure practices of socially responsible Chinese listed firms as displayed in their annual reports and corporate social responsibility reports from the perspective of stakeholders. A stakeholder-driven, three-dimensional social and environmental disclosure index that integrates the quantity and two aspects of the quality of disclosure perceived by stakeholders is constructed to assess the social and environmental disclosures in firm annual reports and CSR reports. The study results indicate that stakeholders perceive different disclosure types and (...)
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  • Euphemisms and hypocrisy in corporate philanthropy.Anders la Cour & Joakim Kromann - 2011 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 20 (3):267-279.
    Over the past two decades, a growing number of large multinational corporations have come to view philanthropy as an important part of their business operations. This has stimulated research on the many different strategies that are pursued by these corporations in their attempts to become more philanthropic while remaining economically responsible. In this situation, some researchers have argued, corporations run the risk of being caught out as hypocrites. Through an analysis of the corporate social responsibility reports of the biggest multinational (...)
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  • Euphemisms and hypocrisy in corporate philanthropy.Anders la Cour & Joakim Kromann - 2011 - Business Ethics: A European Review 20 (3):267-279.
    Over the past two decades, a growing number of large multinational corporations have come to view philanthropy as an important part of their business operations. This has stimulated research on the many different strategies that are pursued by these corporations in their attempts to become more philanthropic while remaining economically responsible. In this situation, some researchers have argued, corporations run the risk of being caught out as hypocrites. Through an analysis of the corporate social responsibility reports of the biggest multinational (...)
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  • Corporate social responsibility and stakeholder approach: a conceptual review.Nada K. Kakabadse, Cécile Rozuel & Linda Lee-Davies - 2005 - International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 1 (4):277-302.
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  • CSR and Related Terms in SME Owner–Managers’ Mental Models in Six European Countries: National Context Matters.Yves Fassin, Andrea Werner, Annick Van Rossem, Silvana Signori, Elisabet Garriga, Heidi von Weltzien Hoivik & Hans-Jörg Schlierer - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (2):433-456.
    As a contribution to the emerging field of corporate social responsibility cognition, this article reports on the findings of an exploratory study that compares SME owner–managers’ mental models with regard to CSR and related concepts across six European countries. Utilising Repertory Grid Technique, we found that the SME owner–managers’ mental models show a few commonalities as well as a number of differences across the different country samples. We interpret those differences by linking individual cognition to macro-environmental variables, such as language, (...)
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  • Beyond the Stalemate of Economics versus Ethics: Corporate Social Responsibility and the Discourse of the Organizational Self.Michaela Driver - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 66 (4):337-356.
    The purpose of this paper is to advance research on CSR beyond the stalemate of economic versus ethical models by providing an alternative perspective integrating existing views and allowing for more shared dialog and research in the field. It is suggested that we move beyond making a normative case for ethical models and practices of CSR by moving beyond the question of how to manage organizational self-interest toward the question of how accurate current conceptions of the organizational self seem to (...)
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  • The Pragmatic and Ethical Barriers to Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosure: The Nike Case.Kristen Bell DeTienne & Lee W. Lewis - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 60 (4):359-376.
    Numerous studies have documented the demand for information regarding corporations’ relationships to society. Much recent research has demonstrated why stakeholders need this information, and how it benefits both companies and the public. These studies suggest numerous methods by which companies can effectively disclose corporate social responsibility (CSR) information to the public, but in practice, reporting this type of information is fraught with legal and ethical uncertainty often unexplored in most literature. This article represents a fresh analysis of the numerous pragmatic (...)
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  • On voluntarism and the role of governments in CSR: towards a contingency approach.Nikolay A. Dentchev, Mitchell Balen & Elvira Haezendonck - 2014 - Business Ethics: A European Review 24 (4):378-397.
    In the corporate social responsibility literature, the principle of voluntarism is predominant and implies that responsible business activities are discretionary and reach beyond the rule of law. This principle fails to explain that governments have a great interest in CSR and exercise influence on firms’ CSR activities. Therefore, we argue in favour of a contingency approach on voluntarism in CSR. To this end, we analyse the academic literature to demonstrate how governments are part of the CSR debate. We selected 703 (...)
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  • On voluntarism and the role of governments in CSR: towards a contingency approach.Nikolay A. Dentchev, Mitchell van Balen & Elvira Haezendonck - 2014 - Business Ethics: A European Review 24 (4):378-397.
    In the corporate social responsibility (CSR) literature, the principle of voluntarism is predominant and implies that responsible business activities are discretionary and reach beyond the rule of law. This principle fails to explain that governments have a great interest in CSR and exercise influence on firms’ CSR activities. Therefore, we argue in favour of a contingency approach on voluntarism in CSR. To this end, we analyse the academic literature to demonstrate how governments are part of the CSR debate. We selected (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility as Argument on the Web.C. Coupland - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 62 (4):355-366.
    This paper critically examines the language drawn on to describe socially responsible activities (CSR) in the context of the corporate web page. I argue that constructions of CSR are made plausible and legitimised according to the context of the expression. The web site is a genre of communication which addresses a broad and discerning audience; hence fractures in the institutionalised nature of argument may be apparent. The focus of this paper is to examine how the rhetoric of CSR is legitimised (...)
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  • The Quest to improve the human condition: The first 1 500 articles published in journal of business ethics. [REVIEW]Denis Collins - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 26 (1):1 - 73.
    In 1999, the Journal of Business Ethics published its 1 500th article. This article commemorates the journal's quest "to improve the human condition" (Michalos, 1988, p. 1) with a summary and assessment of the first eighteen volumes. The first part provides an overview of JBE, highlighting the journal's growth, types of methodologies published, and the breadth of the field. The second part provides a detailed account of the quantitative research findings. Major research topics include (1) prevalence of ethical behavior, (2) (...)
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  • Voluntary social disclosures by large UK companies.Stephen Brammer & Stephen Pavelin - 2004 - Business Ethics 13 (2-3):86-99.
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  • The evolution of corporate charitable contributions in the UK between 1989 and 1999: Industry structure and stakeholder influences. [REVIEW]Stephen Brammer & Andrew Millington - 2003 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 12 (3):216–228.
  • The evolution of corporate charitable contributions in the UK between 1989 and 1999: industry structure and stakeholder influences. [REVIEW]Stephen Brammer & Andrew Millington - 2003 - Business Ethics: A European Review 12 (3):216-228.
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  • The Effect of Stakeholder Preferences, Organizational Structure and Industry Type on Corporate Community Involvement.Stephen Brammer & Andrew Millington - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 45 (3):213 - 226.
    This paper analyses the relationships between corporate community involvement activities, the organizational structures within which they are managed, the firm's industry and evolving stakeholder attitudes and preferences in a sample of 148 U.K. based firms who have demonstrated a clear desire to be socially responsible. The research highlights significant associations between the allocation of responsibility for community involvement within the firm, its industry and the extent of its community involvement activities. Consistent with the view that managerial structures may play a (...)
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  • Corporate Reputation and Philanthropy: An Empirical Analysis.Stephen Brammer & Andrew Millington - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 61 (1):29-44.
    This paper analyzes the determinants of corporate reputation within a sample of large UK companies drawn from a diverse range of industries. We pay particular attention to the role that philanthropic expenditures and policies may play in shaping the perceptions of companies among their stakeholders. Our findings highlight that companies which make higher levels of philanthropic expenditures have better reputations and that this effect varies significantly across industries. Given that reputational indices tend to reflect the financial performance of organizations above (...)
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  • The Emergence of Corporate Social Responsibility in Chile: The Importance of Authenticity and Social Networks.Terry Beckman, Alison Colwell & Peggy H. Cunningham - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 86 (S2):191 - 206.
    Little is known about how and why corporate social responsibility (CSR) emerged in lesser developed countries. In order to address this knowledge gap, we used Chile as a test case and conducted a series of in-depth interviews with leaders of CSR initiatives. We also did an Internet and literature search to help provide support for the findings that emerged from our data. We discovered that while there are similarities in the drivers of CSR in developed countries, there are distinct differences (...)
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