Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Egg Cell Preservation and the Right to Die in The Netherlands: Citizens’ Choices and the Limits of Medicine.Dorothea P. Touwen - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (3):449-457.
    It is a funny thing with the Dutch. On one hand, they seem preoccupied with death and adamant that patients be allowed to decide for themselves in what way they want to die. On the other, contrary to popular belief, the Dutch physician is allotted a very influential role in treatment decisions, far more prominent than in many other Western countries. From an American perspective Dutch professional ethics may seem quite paternalistic: a patient’s freedom to decide to have a particular (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • ‘Debating the Morality and Legality of Medically Assisted Dying’. Critical Notice of Emily Jackson and John Keown, Debating Euthanasia. Oxford: Hart Publishing, 2012. [REVIEW]Robert Young - 2013 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (1):151-160.
    In this Critical Notice of Emily Jackson and John Keown’s Debating Euthanasia , the respective lines of argument put forward by each contributor are set out and the key debating points identified. Particular consideration is given to the points each contributor makes concerning the sanctity of human life and whether slippery slopes leading from voluntary medically assisted dying to non-voluntary euthanasia would be established if voluntary medically assisted dying were to be legalised. Finally, consideration is given to the positions adopted (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Voluntary Euthanasia, Physician-Assisted Suicide, and the Right to Do Wrong.Jukka Varelius - 2013 - HEC Forum 25 (3):1-15.
    It has been argued that voluntary euthanasia (VE) and physician-assisted suicide (PAS) are morally wrong. Yet, a gravely suffering patient might insist that he has a moral right to the procedures even if they were morally wrong. There are also philosophers who maintain that an agent can have a moral right to do something that is morally wrong. In this article, I assess the view that a suffering patient can have a moral right to VE and PAS despite the moral (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Physician-Assisted Dying and Two Senses of an Incurable Condition.Jukka Varelius - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (9):601-604.
    It is commonly accepted that voluntary active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide can be allowed, if at all, only in the cases of patients whose conditions are incurable. Yet, there are different understandings of when a patient’s condition is incurable. In this article, I consider two understandings of the notion of an incurable condition that can be found in the recent debate on physician-assisted dying. According to one of them, a condition is incurable when it is known that there is no (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Neuroenhancement, the Criminal Justice System, and the Problem of Alienation.Jukka Varelius - 2019 - Neuroethics 13 (3):325-335.
    It has been suggested that neuroenhancements could be used to improve the abilities of criminal justice authorities. Judges could be made more able to make adequately informed and unbiased decisions, for example. Yet, while such a prospect appears appealing, the views of neuroenhanced criminal justice authorities could also be alien to the unenhanced public. This could compromise the legitimacy and functioning of the criminal justice system. In this article, I assess possible solutions to this problem. I maintain that none of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Neuroenhancement, the Criminal Justice System, and the Problem of Alienation.Jukka Varelius - 2019 - Neuroethics 13 (3):325-335.
    It has been suggested that neuroenhancements could be used to improve the abilities of criminal justice authorities. Judges could be made more able to make adequately informed and unbiased decisions, for example. Yet, while such a prospect appears appealing, the views of neuroenhanced criminal justice authorities could also be alien to the unenhanced public. This could compromise the legitimacy and functioning of the criminal justice system. In this article, I assess possible solutions to this problem. I maintain that none of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ending Life, Morality, and Meaning.Jukka Varelius - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (3):559-574.
    Opponents of voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide often maintain that the procedures ought not to be accepted because ending an innocent human life would both be morally wrong in itself and have unfortunate consequences. A gravely suffering patient can grant that ending his life would involve such harm but still insist that he would have reason to continue living only if there were something to him in his abstaining from ending his life. Though relatively rarely, the notion of meaning of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Physician–Patient Relationship, Assisted Suicide and the Italian Constitutional Court.E. Turillazzi, A. Maiese, P. Frati, M. Scopetti & M. Di Paolo - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (4):671-681.
    In 2017, Italy passed a law that provides for a systematic discipline on informed consent, advance directives, and advance care planning. It ranges from decisions contextual to clinical necessity through the tool of consent/refusal to decisions anticipating future events through the tools of shared care planning and advance directives. Nothing is said in the law regarding the issue of physician assisted suicide. Following the DJ Fabo case, the Italian Constitutional Court declared the constitutional illegitimacy of article 580 of the criminal (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Physician-Assisted Dying Outlaws: Self-Appointed Death in the Netherlands.Suzanne Ost - 2011 - Clinical Ethics 6 (1):20-26.
    No law in any jurisdiction that permits physician assisted dying offers individuals a medically assisted death without the need to comply with certain criteria. The Netherlands is no exception. There is evidence to suggest that physicians are averse to providing an assisted death even when the Dutch ‘due care criteria’ have been met and the unbearable pain and suffering requirement is especially difficult to satisfy. Some individuals with an enduring desire to die who do not meet the ‘due care’ criteria (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Bioethics in Denmark.Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen & Martin Marchman Andersen - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (3):326-333.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Is Continuous Sedation at the End of Life an Ethically Preferable Alternative to Physician-Assisted Suicide?Kasper Raus, Sigrid Sterckx & Freddy Mortier - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):32 - 40.
    The relatively new practice of continuous sedation at the end of life (CS) is increasingly being debated in the clinical and ethical literature. This practice received much attention when a U.S. Supreme Court ruling noted that the availability of CS made legalization of physician-assisted suicide (PAS) unnecessary, as CS could alleviate even the most severe suffering. This view has been widely adopted. In this article, we perform an in-depth analysis of four versions of this ?argument of preferable alternative.? Our goal (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  • Regulación de la eutanasia y el suicidio asistido en España. ¿Hacia qué modelo se dirige la opinión pública?M. ª Ángeles Molina Martínez & Rafael Serrano del Rosal - 2014 - Arbor 190 (769):a174.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Trust Increases Euthanasia Acceptance: A Multilevel Analysis Using the European Values Study.Vanessa Köneke - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):86.
    This study tests how various kinds of trust impact attitudes toward euthanasia among the general public. The indication that trust might have an impact on euthanasia attitudes is based on the slippery slope argument, which asserts that allowing euthanasia might lead to abuses and involuntary deaths. Adopting this argument usually leads to less positive attitudes towards euthanasia. Tying in with this, it is assumed here that greater trust diminishes such slippery slope fears, and thereby increases euthanasia acceptance.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Morally-Relevant Similarities and Differences Between Assisted Dying Practices in Paradigm and Non-Paradigm Circumstances: Could They Inform Regulatory Decisions?Jeffrey Kirby - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (4):475-483.
    There has been contentious debate over the years about whether there are morally relevant similarities and differences between the three practices of continuous deep sedation until death, physician-assisted suicide, and voluntary euthanasia. Surprisingly little academic attention has been paid to a comparison of the uses of these practices in the two types of circumstances in which they are typically performed. A comparative domains of ethics analysis methodological approach is used in the paper to compare 1) the use of the three (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Final Act: An Ethical Analysis of Pia Dijkstra’s Euthanasia for a Completed Life.T. J. Holzman - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):165-175.
    Amongst other countries, the Netherlands currently allows euthanasia, provided the physician performing the procedure adheres to a strict set of requirements. In 2016, Second Chamber member Pia Dijkstra submitted a law proposal which would also allow euthanasia without the reason necessarily having any medical foundation; euthanasia on the basis of a completed life. The debate on this topic has been ongoing for over two decades, but this law proposal has made the discussion much more immediate and concrete. This paper considers (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Value-Impregnated Factual Claims and Slippery-Slope Arguments.Gert Helgesson, Niels Lynøe & Niklas Juth - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (1):147-150.
    Slippery-slope arguments typically question a course of action by estimating that it will end in misery once the first unfortunate step is taken. Previous studies indicate that estimations of the long-term consequences of certain debated actions, such as legalizing physician-assisted suicide, may be strongly influenced by tacit personal values. In this paper, we suggest that to the extent that slippery-slope arguments rest on estimations of future events, they may be mere rationalizations of personal values. This might explain why there are (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Can Physicians Conceive of Performing Euthanasia in Case of Psychiatric Disease, Dementia or Being Tired of Living?Eva Elizabeth Bolt, Marianne C. Snijdewind, Dick L. Willems, Agnes van der Heide & Bregje D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):592-598.
  • Ist die Beihilfe zum Suizid auf der Grundlage des Wunsches, anderen nicht zur Last zu fallen, ethisch gerechtfertigt?Is physician-assisted suicide justifiable when the patient is worried about being a burden to others?Julian Bleek - 2012 - Ethik in der Medizin 24 (3):193-205.
    ZusammenfassungEin Argument gegen die ärztliche Beihilfe zum Suizid lautet, Patienten könnten sich um Suizidassistenz bemühen, weil sie sich als Belastung empfinden. Dabei wird die Selbstbestimmtheit eines so motivierten Todeswunsches in Frage gestellt. Ist dieses Argument überzeugungskräftig? Empirische Daten zeigen, dass die ärztliche Beihilfe zum Suizid auf der Grundlage dieses Motivs den ethischen Prinzipien der Sorge um das Patientenwohl und des Respekts vor der Autonomie des Patienten nicht widersprechen muss. Denn das Empfinden, anderen zur Last zu fallen, kann trotz adäquater palliativmedizinischer (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ist die Beihilfe zum Suizid auf der Grundlage des Wunsches, anderen nicht zur Last zu fallen, ethisch gerechtfertigt?Dr Julian Bleek - 2012 - Ethik in der Medizin 24 (3):193-205.
    Ein Argument gegen die ärztliche Beihilfe zum Suizid lautet, Patienten könnten sich um Suizidassistenz bemühen, weil sie sich als Belastung empfinden. Dabei wird die Selbstbestimmtheit eines so motivierten Todeswunsches in Frage gestellt. Ist dieses Argument überzeugungskräftig? Empirische Daten zeigen, dass die ärztliche Beihilfe zum Suizid auf der Grundlage dieses Motivs den ethischen Prinzipien der Sorge um das Patientenwohl und des Respekts vor der Autonomie des Patienten nicht widersprechen muss. Denn das Empfinden, anderen zur Last zu fallen, kann trotz adäquater palliativmedizinischer (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Euthanasia Embedded in Palliative Care. Responses to Essentialistic Criticisms of the Belgian Model of Integral End-of-Life Care.Jan L. Bernheim & Kasper Raus - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (8):489-494.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Ethical and Legal Aspects of Palliative Sedation in Severely Brain Injured Patients: A French Perspective.Antoine Baumann, Frederique Claudot, Gerard Audibert, Paul-Michel Mertes & Louis Puybasset - 2011 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 6:4.
    To fulfill their crucial duty of relieving suffering in their patients, physicians may have to administer palliative sedation when they implement treatment-limitation decisions such as the withdrawal of life-supporting interventions in patients with poor prognosis chronic severe brain injury. The issue of palliative sedation deserves particular attention in adults with serious brain injuries and in neonates with severe and irreversible brain lesions, who are unable to express pain or to state their wishes. In France, treatment limitation decisions for these patients (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Truth-Telling and Doctor-Assisted Death as Perceived by Israeli Physicians.Arnona Ziv Baruch Velan, Carmit Rubin Giora Kaplan, Tami Karni Yaron Connelly & Orna Tal - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):13.
    Medicine has undergone substantial changes in the way medical dilemmas are being dealt with. Here we explore the attitude of Israeli physicians to two debatable dilemmas: disclosing the full truth to patients...
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Physician-Assisted Death with Limited Access to Palliative Care.Joaquín Barutta & Jochen Vollmann - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):652-654.
  • Regimes of Autonomy.Joel Anderson - 2014 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (3):355-368.
    Like being able to drive a car, being autonomous is a socially attributed, claimed, and contested status. Normative debates about criteria for autonomy (and what autonomy entitles one to) are best understood, not as debates about what autonomy, at core, really is, but rather as debates about the relative merits of various possible packages of thresholds, entitlements, regulations, values, and institutions. Within different “regimes” of autonomy, different criteria for (degrees of) autonomy become authoritative. Neoliberal, solidaristic, and perfectionist regimes entail conflicting (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Voluntary Euthanasia.Robert Young - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations