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  1. Predicting Vs. Guessing: The Role of Confidence for Pupillometric Markers of Curiosity and Surprise.Maria Theobald, Elena Galeano-Keiner & Garvin Brod - 2022 - Cognition and Emotion 36 (4):731-740.
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  • Storytelling as Adaptive Collective Sensemaking.Lucas M. Bietti, Ottilie Tilston & Adrian Bangerter - 2019 - Topics in Cognitive Science 11 (4):710-732.
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  • Editors’ Introduction and Review: An Appraisal of Surprise: Tracing the Threads That Stitch It Together.Edward L. Munnich, Meadhbh I. Foster & Mark T. Keane - 2019 - Topics in Cognitive Science 11 (1):37-49.
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  • A Contrast‐Based Computational Model of Surprise and Its Applications.Luis Macedo & Amílcar Cardoso - 2019 - Topics in Cognitive Science 11 (1):88-102.
    We review our work on a contrast-based computational model of surprise and its applications. The review is contextualized within related research from psychology, philosophy, and particularly artificial intelligence. Influenced by psychological theories of surprise, the model assumes that surprise-eliciting events initiate a series of cognitive processes that begin with the appraisal of the event as unexpected, continue with the interruption of ongoing activity and the focusing of attention on the unexpected event, and culminate in the analysis and evaluation of the (...)
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  • The Effect of Evidential Impact on Perceptual Probabilistic Judgments.Marta Mangiarulo, Stefania Pighin, Luca Polonio & Katya Tentori - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (1):e12919.
    In a series of three behavioral experiments, we found a systematic distortion of probability judgments concerning elementary visual stimuli. Participants were briefly shown a set of figures that had two features (e.g., a geometric shape and a color) with two possible values each (e.g., triangle or circle and black or white). A figure was then drawn, and participants were informed about the value of one of its features (e.g., that the figure was a “circle”) and had to predict the value (...)
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  • Experiencing (in) Time.Jack Shardlow - 2019 - Dissertation, University of Warwick
    In this thesis I present a phenomenological investigation of our experience of time – of things as they fall within time – and suggest that something important goes missing in recent debates. This is the notion of a point of view. I believe that articulating the sense in which we have a point of view in time, and what this is a point of view upon, is crucial to an account of how things are for an experiencing subject. In the (...)
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  • Surprise Me! On the Impact of Unexpected Benefits on Other-Praising Gratitude Expressions.Alexa Weiss, Pascal Burgmer & Jens Lange - 2020 - Tandf: Cognition and Emotion 34 (8):1608-1620.
    Volume 34, Issue 8, December 2020, Page 1608-1620.
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  • Approach and Avoidance During Routine Behavior and During Surprise in a Non-Evaluative Task: Surprise Matters and So Does the Valence of the Surprising Event.Achim Schützwohl - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Attention Capture by Episodic Long-Term Memory.Allison E. Nickel, Lauren S. Hopkins, Greta N. Minor & Deborah E. Hannula - 2020 - Cognition 201:104312.
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  • Novelty Manipulations, Memory Performance, and Predictive Coding: The Role of Unexpectedness.Richárd Reichardt, Bertalan Polner & Péter Simor - 2020 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
  • Surprise: Unfolding of Facial Expressions.Marret K. Noordewier & Eric van Dijk - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (5):915-930.
    ABSTRACTResponses to surprising events are dynamic. We argue that initial responses are primarily driven by the unexpectedness of the surprising event and reflect an interrupted and surprised state in which the outcome does not make sense yet. Later responses, after sense-making, are more likely to incorporate the valence of the outcome itself. To identify initial and later responses to surprising stimuli, we conducted two repetition-change studies and coded the general valence of facial expressions using computerised facial coding and specific facial (...)
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  • Cognition and Emotion: A Plea for Theory.Rainer Reisenzein - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (1):109-118.