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  1. Individual Difference in Acts of Self-Sacrifice.Michael N. Stagnaro, Rebecca Littman & David G. Rand - 2018 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 41.
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  • A Framework on Polarization, Cognitive Inflexibility, and Rigid Cognitive Specialization.James Shyan-Tau Wu, Christoph Hauert, Claire Kremen & Jiaying Zhao - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Polarization is pervasive in the current sociopolitical discourse. Polarization tends to increase cognitive inflexibility where people become less capable of updating their beliefs upon new information or switching between different ways of thinking. Cognitive inflexibility can in turn increase polarization. We propose that this positive feedback loop between polarization and cognitive inflexibility is a form of threat response that has benefited humans throughout their evolutionary history. This feedback loop, which can be driven by conflict mindset, group conformity, and simplification of (...)
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  • Hardwiring: Innateness in the Age of the Brain.Giordana Grossi - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (6):1047-1082.
    “Hardwired” is a term commonly used to describe the properties of certain behaviors or brain regions. As its usage has increased exponentially in the past 50 years, both in popular media and the scholarly literature, the concept appears to have gained a cloak of respectability in scientific discourse. However, its specific meaning is difficult to pinpoint. In this paper, I examine how “hardwired” has been used in the psychological and neuroscientific literature. The analysis reveals two major themes: one centers on (...)
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  • Miserliness in Human Cognition: The Interaction of Detection, Override and Mindware.Keith E. Stanovich - 2018 - Thinking and Reasoning 24 (4):423-444.
    ABSTRACTHumans are cognitive misers because their basic tendency is to default to processing mechanisms of low computational expense. Such a tendency leads to suboptimal outcomes in certain types of hostile environments. The theoretical inferences made from correct and incorrect responding on heuristics and biases tasks have been overly simplified, however. The framework developed here traces the complexities inherent in these tasks by identifying five processing states that are possible in most heuristics and biases tasks. The framework also identifies three possible (...)
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