Switch to: References

Citations of:

Uncontainable Life : A Biophilosophy of Bioart

Dissertation, Linköping University (2016)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. A Bite of the Forbidden Fruit: The Abject of Food and Affirmative Environmental Ethics.Anne Sauka - 2022 - Open Philosophy 5 (1):281-295.
    This article explores the negative framing of environmental concern in the context of food procurement and consumption, through the lens of the myth of Eden considering the ontological and genealogical aspects of the experienced exile from nature. The article first considers the theoretical context of the negative framing of food ethics. Demonstrating the consequences of the experience of food as abject, the article then goes on to discuss the exile from Eden as an explanatory myth for the perceptual inbetweenness of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Doing Away with Life: On Biophilosophy, the Non/Living, Toxic Embodiment, and Reimagining Ethics.Marietta Radomska & Cecilia Åsberg - 2020 - In Erich Berger, Kasperi Mäki-Reinikka, Kira O'Reilly & Helena Sederholm (eds.), Art As We Don’t Know It. Helsinki, Finland: pp. 54-63.
    In this chapter we argue for biophilosophy as a queerfeminist and posthumanities methodology that attends to the question of life by focusing on multiple differences and transformations, materiality and processuality, as well as relations, intra-actions, and disconnections. By combining both the ontological and ethical concerns that go beyond what is conventionally seen as “life”, biophilosophy offers a critical and innovative approach to the issues of death, extinction, (un) liveability, terminality, and toxicity, among others, which all form the backbone of the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Living Machines: Metaphors We Live By.Nora S. Vaage - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (1):57-70.
    Within biology and in society, living creatures have long been described using metaphors of machinery and computation: ‘bioengineering’, ‘genes as code’ or ‘biological chassis’. This paper builds on Lakoff and Johnson’s argument that such language mechanisms shape how we understand the world. I argue that the living machines metaphor builds upon a certain perception of life entailing an idea of radical human control of the living world, looking back at the historical preconditions for this metaphor. I discuss how design is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Queer Death Studies: Death, Dying and Mourning From a Queerfeminist Perspective.Marietta Radomska, Tara Mehrabi & Nina Lykke - 2020 - Australian Feminist Studies 35 (104):81-100.
    This introduction to the Queer Death Studies special issue explores an emerging transdisciplinary field of research. This field critically, reflexively and affirmatively investigates and challenges conventional normativities, assumptions, expectations, and regimes of truths that are brought to life and made evident by current planetary scale necropolitics and its framing of death, dying and mourning in the contemporary world. It is set against the background of traditional engagements with the question of death, often grounded in Western hegemonic and normative ideas of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Deterritorialising Death: Queerfeminist Biophilosophy and Ecologies of the Non/Living in Contemporary Art.Marietta Radomska - 2020 - Australian Feminist Studies 35 (104).
    In the contemporary context of environmental crises and the degradation of resources, certain habitats become unliveable, leading to the death of individuals and species extinction. Whilst bioscience emphasises interdependency and relationality as crucial characteristics of life shared by all organisms, Western cultural imaginaries tend to draw a thick dividing line between humans and nonhumans, particularly evident in the context of death. On the one hand, death appears as a process common to all forms of life; on the other, as an (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Making Death Matter : A Feminist Technoscience Study of Alzheimer's Sciences in the Laboratory.Tara Mehrabi - unknown
    This thesis is a contribution to feminist laboratory studies and a critical engagement with the natural sciences, or more precisely research on the biochemical workings and deadly relations of Alzheimer’s disease emanating from a year of field work in a Drosophila fly lab. The natural sciences have been a point of fascination within the field of gender studies for decades. Such sciences produce knowledge on what gets to count as nature and natural, healthy or sick, normal or not, and they (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Non/Living Matter, Bioscientific Imaginaries and Feminist Techno-Ecologies of Bioart.Marietta Radomska - 2017 - Australian Feminist Studies 32 (94):377-394.
    Bioart is a form of hybrid artistico-scientific practices in contemporary art that involve the use of bio-materials (such as living cells, tissues, organisms) and scientific techniques, protocols, and tools. Bioart-works embody vulnerability (intrinsic to all beings) and depend on (bio)technologies that allow these creations to come into being, endure and flourish but also discipline them. This article focuses on ‘semi-living’ sculptures by The Tissue Culture and Art Project (TC&A). TC&A’s artworks consist of bioengineered mammal tissues grown over biopolymer scaffoldings of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations