Switch to: References

Citations of:

Autonomy, Rationality, and Contemporary Bioethics

Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (2020)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Cognitive Diminishments and Crime Prevention: “Too Smart for the Rest of Us”?Sebastian Jon Holmen - 2022 - Neuroethics 15 (1):1-13.
    In this paper, I discuss whether it is ever morally permissible to diminish the cognitive abilities or capacities of some cognitively gifted offenders whose ability to commit their crimes successfully relies on them possessing these abilities or capacities. I suggest that, given such cognitive diminishments may prevent such offenders from re-offending and causing others considerable harm, this provides us with at least one good moral reason in favour of employing them. After setting out more clearly what cognitive diminishment may consist (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Das Verständnis von Wohl im Betreuungsrecht – eine Analyse anlässlich der Streichung des Wohlbegriffs aus dem reformierten Gesetz.Esther Braun, Jakov Gather, Tanja Henking, Jochen Vollmann & Matthé Scholten - forthcoming - Ethik in der Medizin:1-14.
    Mit der 2023 in Kraft tretenden Reform des Betreuungsrechts wird der Begriff „Wohl“ aus dem Gesetz gestrichen. Hierdurch soll stärker hervorgehoben werden, dass sich der Betreuer an den subjektiven Wünschen des Betreuten statt an einem objektiven Wohlverständnis orientieren soll. In diesem Beitrag wird ermittelt, welches Verständnis von Wohl das reformierte Betreuungsrecht in Abgleich zu gängigen medizinethisch-philosophischen Auffassungen des Wohls implizit enthält. Indem untersucht wird, in welchem Verhältnis das betreuungsrechtliche und das medizinethische bzw. philosophische Verständnis von Wohl zueinanderstehen, soll die interdisziplinäre (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Autonomy and the Folk Concept of Valid Consent.Joanna Demaree-Cotton & Roseanna Sommers - 2022 - Cognition 224:105065.
    Consent governs innumerable everyday social interactions, including sex, medical exams, the use of property, and economic transactions. Yet little is known about how ordinary people reason about the validity of consent. Across the domains of sex, medicine, and police entry, Study 1 showed that when agents lack autonomous decision-making capacities, participants are less likely to view their consent as valid; however, failing to exercise this capacity and deciding in a nonautonomous way did not reduce consent judgments. Study 2 found that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Highway to (Digital) Surveillance: When Are Clients Coerced to Share Their Data with Insurers?Michele Loi, Christian Hauser & Markus Christen - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (1):7-19.
    Clients may feel trapped into sharing their private digital data with insurance companies to get a desired insurance product or premium. However, private insurance must collect some data to offer products and premiums appropriate to the client’s level of risk. This situation creates tension between the value of privacy and common insurance business practice. We argue for three main claims: first, coercion to share private data with insurers is pro tanto wrong because it violates the autonomous choice of a privacy-valuing (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Clarifying the Normative Significance of ‘Personality Changes’ Following Deep Brain Stimulation.Jonathan Pugh - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (3):1655-1680.
    There is evidence to suggest that some patients who undergo Deep Brain Stimulation can experience changes to dispositional, emotional and behavioural states that play a central role in conceptions of personality, identity, autonomy, authenticity, agency and/or self. For example, some patients undergoing DBS for Parkinson’s Disease have developed hypersexuality, and some have reported increased apathy. Moreover, experimental psychiatric applications of DBS may intentionally seek to elicit changes to the patient’s dispositional, emotional and behavioural states, in so far as dysfunctions in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Relational Autonomy, the Right to Reject Treatment, and Advance Directives in Japan.Anri Asagumo - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 14 (1):57-69.
    Although the patient’s right to decide what they want for themselves, which is encompassed in the notion of ‘patient-centred medicine’ and ‘informed consent’, is widely recognised and emphasised in Japan, there remain grave problems when it comes to respecting the wishes of the no-longer-competent when death is imminent. In general, it is believed that the concepts above do not include the right to refuse treatment when treatment withdrawal inevitably results in death, even when the patient previously expressed the wish to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Lies of Omission and Commission, Providing and Withholding Treatment, Local and Global Autonomy – There Are Reasons for Clinical Ethicists to Attend to All of These Distinctions.Jonathan Pugh - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (5):43-45.
    Meyers argues that clinical ethicists should sometimes be active participants in the deception of patients and families, whether that involves lies of omission or commission. I shall...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation