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  1. Wallace’s and Darwin’s Natural Selection Theories.Santiago Ginnobili & Daniel Blanco - 2019 - Synthese 196 (3):991-1017.
    This work takes a stand on whether Wallace should be regarded as co-author of the theory of natural selection alongside Darwin as he is usually considered on behalf of his alleged essential contribution to the conception of the theory. It does so from a perspective unexplored thus far: we will argue for Darwin’s priority based on a rational reconstruction of the theory of natural selection as it appears in the writings of both authors. We show that the theory does not (...)
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  • “Plants That Remind Me of Home”: Collecting, Plant Geography, and a Forgotten Expedition in the Darwinian Revolution.Kuang-chi Hung - 2017 - Journal of the History of Biology 50 (1):71-132.
    In 1859, Harvard botanist Asa Gray (1810–1888) published an essay of what he called “the abstract of Japan botany.” In it, he applied Charles Darwin’s evolutionary theory to explain why strong similarities could be found between the flora of Japan and that of eastern North America, which provoked his famous debate with Louis Agassiz (1807–1873) and initiated Gray’s efforts to secure a place for Darwinian biology in the American sciences. Notably, although the Gray–Agassiz debate has become one of the most (...)
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  • Joseph Dalton Hooker's Ideals for a Professional Man of Science.Richard Bellon - 2001 - Journal of the History of Biology 34 (1):51 - 82.
    During the 1840s and the 1850s botanist Joseph Hooker developed distinct notions about the proper characteristics of a professional man of science. While he never articulated these ideas publicly as a coherent agenda, he did share his opinions openly in letters to family and colleagues; this private communication gives essential insight into his and his X-Club colleagues' public activities. The core aspiration of Hooker's professionalization was to consolidate men of science into a dutiful and centralized community dedicated to national well-being. (...)
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  • Laboratory Science Versus Country-House Experiments. The Controversy Between Julius Sachs and Charles Darwin.Soraya De Chadarevian - 1996 - British Journal for the History of Science 29 (1):17-41.
    In 1880, Charles Darwin published The Power of Movement in Plants, a heavy volume of nearly six hundred pages in which he presented the results of many years of experiments conducted with his son Francis on the reaction of plants to the influence of light and gravity. His results contradicted the observations and explanations of the same phenomena offered by the German plant physiologist Julius Sachs in his influential Lehrbuch der Botanik . Darwin wished rather to ‘convert him than any (...)
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  • A Life More Ordinary: The Dull Life but Interesting Times of Joseph Dalton Hooker. [REVIEW]Jim Endersby - 2011 - Journal of the History of Biology 44 (4):611 - 631.
    The life of Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817-1911) provides an invaluable lens through which to view mid-Victorian science. A biographical approach makes it clear that some well-established narratives about this period need revising. For example, Hooker's career cannot be considered an example of the professionalisation of the sciences, given the doubtful respectability of being paid to do science and his reliance on unpaid collectors with pretensions to equal scientific and/or social status. Nor was Hooker's response to Darwin's theories either straightforward or (...)
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  • Joseph Hooker Takes a “Fixed Post”: Transmutation and the “Present Unsatisfactory State of Systematic Botany”, 1844–1860. [REVIEW]Richard Bellon - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (1):1 - 39.
    Joseph Hooker first learned that Charles Darwin believed in the transmutation of species in 1844. For the next 14 years, Hooker remained a "nonconsenter" to Darwin's views, resolving to keep the question of species origin "subservient to Botany instead of Botany to it, as must be the true relation." Hooker placed particular emphasis on the need for any theory of species origin to support the broad taxonomic delimitation of species, a highly contentious issue. His always provisional support for special creation (...)
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  • The Man Who Would Be King of Botanical Classification.Sheila Ann Dean - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 41 (3):300-303.
  • The Man Who Would Be King of Botanical Classification.Sheila Ann Dean - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 41 (3):300-303.
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  • Joseph Hooker Takes a “Fixed Post”: Transmutation and the “Present Unsatisfactory State of Systematic Botany”, 1844–1860.Richard Bellon - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (1):1-39.
    Joseph Hooker first learned that Charles Darwin believed in the transmutation of species in 1844. For the next 14 years, Hooker remained a "nonconsenter" to Darwin's views, resolving to keep the question of species origin "subservient to Botany instead of Botany to it, as must be the true relation." Hooker placed particular emphasis on the need for any theory of species origin to support the broad taxonomic delimitation of species, a highly contentious issue. His always provisional support for special creation (...)
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