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  1. Egoism, ‘Morality’ and Irrationality – A Rejoinder to Harvey Siegel1.Helen Freeman - 1979 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 11 (1):51-61.
  • Criterion-referenced Assessment and the Development of Knowledge and Understanding.Andrew Davis - 1995 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 29 (1):3-21.
    Criterion referenced assessment, if high stakes is not compatible with the development of rich knowledge and understanding in schools.
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  • Vision and Elusiveness in Philosophy of Education: R. S. Peters on the Legacy of Michael Oakeshott.Kevin Williams - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (supplement s1):223-240.
    Despite his elusiveness on important issues, there is much in Michael Oakeshott's educational vision that Richard Peters quite rightly wishes to endorse. The main aim of this essay is, however, to consider Peters' justifiable critique of three features of Oakeshott's work. These are (1) the rigidity of his distinction between vocational and university education, (2) the lack of clarity and accuracy in his philosophy of teaching and learning, especially the under-conceptualisation of the role of example in teaching, (3) the over-emphasis (...)
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  • Ritual, Imitation and Education in R. S. Peters.Bryan R. Warnick - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (supplement s1):57-74.
    This article reconstructs R. S. Peters' underlying theory of ritual in education, highlighting his proposed link between ritual and the imitation of teachers. Rituals set the stage for the imitation of teachers and they invite students to experience practices whose value is not easily discernable from the outside. For Peters, rituals facilitate the transmission of values across time, create unity in schools, and affirm authority relations. There is a tension, however, between this view of ritual and imitation, on the one (...)
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  • Philosophy of education in Australasia: A definition and a history.James S. Kaminsky - 1988 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 20 (1):12-26.
  • Mindfulness and the Therapeutic Function of Education.Terry Hyland - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (1):119-131.
    Although it has been given qualified approval by a number of philosophers of education, the so-called ‘therapeutic turn’ in education has been the subject of criticism by several commentators on post-compulsory and adult learning over the last few years. A key feature of this alleged development in recent educational policy is said to be the replacement of the traditional goals of knowledge and understanding with personal and social objectives concerned with enhancing and developing confidence and self-esteem in learners. After offering (...)
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  • The aims of education and the leap of freedom.SunInn Yun - 2014 - Ethics and Education 9 (3):276-291.
    This paper considers the place of freedom in discussions of the aims of education. Bearing in mind remarks of R.S. Peters to the affect that the singling out of aims can ‘fall into the hands of rationalistically minded curriculum planners’, it begins by considering the views of Roland Reichenbach regarding Bildung and his account of this in ateleological terms. The particular place of freedom is examined in the light of the writings of Martin Heidegger and Jean-Luc Nancy. The meaning of (...)
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  • Authority.Gary Young - 1974 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 3 (4):563 - 583.
    Philosophers often contrast personal authority to authority vested in offices. Some such distinction is traditional and sometimes useful. But it does not provide us with an exhaustive classification of the types of authority, for there is a third type of authority that I shall argue is more fundamental than these two. Let us start with the types marked out by the usual distinction.Consider first the sort of authority illustrated by the following sentences:Smith is an authority on physics.Smith has authority as (...)
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  • The Justification of Conceptual Development Claims.Wouter Haaften - 1990 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 24 (1):51-70.
    Wouter Van Haaften; The Justification of Conceptual Development Claims, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 24, Issue 1, 30 May 2006, Pages 51–70, https.
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  • Conceptual Development and Relativism: reply to Siegel.Wouter van Haaften - 1993 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 27 (1):87-100.
    I defend that the development of children may include foundational change, such that stages can be reconstructed representing different views of (the relevant aspect of) reality and involving different forms of judgement in that domain. This implies fundamental stage-relativism. Claims that such stages are better than their forerunners can be justified, if at all, only on stage-bound criteria. This does not preclude the possibility of justibing them, however, except to persons in lower stages. The development produces the possibility of its (...)
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  • Nanoscale Science and Technology and People with Disabilities in Asia: An Ability Expectation Analysis. [REVIEW]Gregor Wolbring & Natalie Ball - 2012 - NanoEthics 6 (2):127-135.
    Science and technology, including nanoscale science and technology, influences and is influenced by various discourses and areas of action. Ableism is one concept and ability expectation is one dynamic that impacts the direction, vision, and application of nanoscale science and technology and vice versa. At the same time, policy documents that involve or relate to disabled people exhibit ability expectations of disabled people. The authors present ability expectations exhibited within two science and technology direction documents from Asia, as well as (...)
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  • Learning the virtues at work.Christopher Winch - 2010 - Ethics and Education 5 (2):173-185.
    An influential view of education is that it prepares young people for adult life, usually in the areas of civic engagement, leisure and contemplation. Employment may be a locus for learning some worthwhile skills and knowledge, but it is not itself the possible locus or one of the possible loci of a worthwhile life. This article disputes that view by drawing attention to those aspects of employment that make it potentially an aspect of a worthwhile life. The exercise and development (...)
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  • Educational assessment: Reply to Andrew Davis.Christopher Winch & John Gingell - 1996 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 30 (3):377–388.
    Assessment is at the heart of teaching as it provides a necessary condition for judging success or failure. It is also necessary to ensure that providers of education are accountable to users and providers of resources. Inferential hazard is an inescapable part of any assessment procedure but cannot be an argument against assessment as such. Rich knowledge may be the aim of education but it does not follow that it is the aim of every stage of education. Teaching to tests (...)
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  • Educational Assessment: reply to Andrew Davis.Christopher Winch & John Gingell - 1996 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 30 (3):377-388.
    Assessment is at the heart of teaching as it provides a necessary condition for judging success or failure. It is also necessary to ensure that providers of education are accountable to users and providers of resources. Inferential hazard is an inescapable part of any assessment procedure but cannot be an argument against assessment as such. Rich knowledge may be the aim of education but it does not follow that it is the aim of every stage of education. Teaching to tests (...)
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  • Developing Critical Rationality as a Pedagogical Aim.Christopher Winch - 2004 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (3):467-484.
    The development of a conception of critical pedagogy is itself an aspect of the development of critical rationality within late modern societies, closely connected with the role of education in developing critical rationality. The role of critique pervades all aspects of life: for people as citizens, workers and self-determining private individuals. Late modern societies depend on a critically minded population for their viability, for the democratic management of a competing balance of interests and for a capacity for rapid renewal. These (...)
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  • The democratic myth.John Wilson & Barbara Cowell - 1983 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 17 (1):111–117.
    John Wilson, Barbara Cowell; The Democratic Myth, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 17, Issue 1, 30 May 2006, Pages 111–117, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.
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  • The Curriculum: Justification and Taxonomy.John Wilson - 1969 - British Journal of Educational Studies 17 (1):36 - 40.
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  • The curriculum: Justification and taxonomy.John Wilson - 1969 - British Journal of Educational Studies 17 (1):36-40.
  • Relativism and teaching.John Wilson - 1986 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 20 (1):89–96.
    John Wilson; Relativism and Teaching, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 20, Issue 1, 30 May 2006, Pages 89–96, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9752.1986.
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  • Making subjects interesting.John Wilson - 1987 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 21 (2):215–223.
    John Wilson; Making Subjects Interesting, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 21, Issue 2, 30 May 2006, Pages 215–222, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-975.
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  • Making Subjects Interesting.John Wilson - 1987 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 21 (2):215-223.
    John Wilson; Making Subjects Interesting, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 21, Issue 2, 30 May 2006, Pages 215–222, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-975.
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  • Why General Education? Peters, Hirst and History.John White - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (supplement s1):123-141.
    Richard Peters argued for a general education based largely on the study of truth-seeking subjects for its own sake. His arguments have long been acknowledged as problematic. There are also difficulties with Paul Hirst's arguments for a liberal education, which in part overlap with Peters'. Where justification fails, can historical explanation illuminate? Peters was influenced by the prevailing idea that a secondary education should be based on traditional, largely knowledge-orientated subjects, pursued for intrinsic as well as practical ends. Does history (...)
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  • Elusive rivalry? Conceptions of the philosophy of education.John White - 2010 - Ethics and Education 5 (2):135-145.
    What is analytical philosophy of education (APE)? And what has been its place in the history of the subject over the last fifty years? In a recent essay in Ethics and Education (Vol 2, No 2 October 2007) on ‘Rival conceptions of the philosophy of education’, Paul Standish described a number of features of APE. Relying on both historical and philosophical argument, the present paper critically assesses these eight points, as well as another five points delineating APE in the Introduction (...)
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  • Analytic Practical Theory of Education and German Critical Pädagogik: Comparing Their Critical Dimension.Flora Liuying Wei - 2019 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 39 (6):625-640.
    Two critical theories—both contemporaneous and complementary—in Western philosophy of education spanning the 1960s to the 1980s will first be explicated, and then their significant intellectual values will be discussed on the basis of such a comparative account. These two critical models are the practical theory of education in the Anglophone world and the critical theory of education in the Continental Germany. I will introduce them—namely, analytic practical educational theory and German critical pädagogik—one after another, by focusing on their complementary differences, (...)
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  • How a Deweyan science education further enables ethics education.Scott Webster - 2008 - Science & Education 17 (8-9):903-919.
  • Centring the subject in order to educate.R. Scott Webster - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (5):519–530.
    It is important for educators to recognise that the various calls to decentre the subject—or self—should not be interpreted as necessarily requiring the removal of the subject altogether. Through the individualism of the Enlightenment the self was centred. This highly individualistic notion of the sovereign self has now been decentred especially through post‐structuralist literature. It is contended here however, that this tendency to decentre the subject has been taken to an extreme at times, especially by some designers of school frameworks (...)
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  • Centring the Subject in Order to Educate.R. Scott Webster - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (5):519-530.
    It is important for educators to recognise that the various calls to decentre the subject—or self—should not be interpreted as necessarily requiring the removal of the subject altogether. Through the individualism of the Enlightenment the self was centred. This highly individualistic notion of the sovereign self has now been decentred especially through post‐structuralist literature. It is contended here however, that this tendency to decentre the subject has been taken to an extreme at times, especially by some designers of school frameworks (...)
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  • Lifelong Education: Illiberal and Repressive?Kenneth Wain - 1993 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 25 (1):58-70.
  • Negotiating the World: Some philosophical considerations on dealing with differential academic language proficiency in schools.Roel Van Goor & Frieda Heyting - 2008 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (5):652-665.
    Differential academic language proficiency is an issue of major educational concern, bearing on problems varying from pupil performance, to social prospects, and citizenship. In this paper we develop a conception of the language‐acquiring subject, and we discuss the consequences for understanding differential language proficiency in schools. Starting from Wittgenstein's meaning‐as‐use theory we show that learning a language requires an activity that relates the subject both to the community of language users, and to the things language is about. In opposition to (...)
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  • Conceptual Development and Relativism: reply to Siegel.Wouter van Haaften - 1993 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 27 (1):87-100.
    I defend that the development of children may include foundational change, such that stages can be reconstructed representing different views of (the relevant aspect of) reality and involving different forms of judgement in that domain. This implies fundamental stage-relativism. Claims that such stages are better than their forerunners can be justified, if at all, only on stage-bound criteria. This does not preclude the possibility of justibing them, however, except to persons in lower stages. The development produces the possibility of its (...)
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  • Richard Peters's theory of moral development.Bernadette M. Tobin - 1989 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 23 (1):15–27.
    Bernadette M Tobin; Richard Peters's Theory of Moral Development, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 23, Issue 1, 30 May 2006, Pages 15–27, https://doi.
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  • Intelligence, Practice and Virtue: A Critical Review of the Educational Benefits of Expertise in Physical Education and Sport.Malcolm Thorburn - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (4):453-463.
    The paper calls for a re-evaluation of physical education’s cognitive value claims, as this issue is fundamental to many of the conceptual difficulties the subject faces. Current epistemological challenges are reviewed before analysing the structural connections between intelligent practice and intelligent virtues, and the possibilities for physical education to better articulate its’ intrinsic and instrumental values claims. The paper evaluates arguments made on this basis and reviews revised curriculum planning and pedagogical practices, which could support an enhanced focus on learners’ (...)
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  • Two concepts or two phases of liberal education?[1].Elmer John Thiessen - 1987 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 21 (2):223–234.
    Elmer John Thiessen; Two Concepts or Two Phases of Liberal Education?, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 21, Issue 2, 30 May 2006, Pages 223–234, https.
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  • Indoctrination and Social Context: A System‐based Approach to Identifying the Threat of Indoctrination and the Responsibilities of Educators.Rebecca M. Taylor - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):38-58.
    Debates about indoctrination raise fundamental questions about the ethics of teaching. This paper presents a philosophical analysis of indoctrination, including 1) an account of what indoctrination is and why it is harmful, and 2) a framework for understanding the responsibilities of teachers and other educational actors to avoid its negative outcomes. I respond to prominent outcomes-based accounts of indoctrination, which I argue share two limiting features—a narrow focus on the threat indoctrination poses to knowledge and on the dyadic relationship between (...)
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  • Phenomenology and Physical Education.Steven A. Stolz - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (9):949-962.
    Physical education is often justified within the curriculum as academic study, as a worthwhile activity on a par with other academic subjects on offer and easy to assess. Part of the problem has been that movement studies in physical education are looked upon as disembodied and disconnected from its central concerns which are associated with employing physical means to develop the whole person. But this, Merleau-Ponty would say, is to ignore the nature of experience and to consider the cognitive aspects (...)
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  • Overcoming Social Pathologies in Education: On the Concept of Respect in R. S. Peters and Axel Honneth.Krassimir Stojanov - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (supplement s1):161-172.
    The concept of respect plays a central role in several recent attempts to re-actualise the programme of a critical social theory. In Axel Honneth's most prominent version of that concept, respect is closely tied to the sphere of law, and it is limited to the recognition of a Kantian-type moral autonomy of the individual. So interpreted, the concept of respect can only have a very limited application in the field of education, where concern for the particular desires, intentions and beliefs (...)
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  • Can Educationally Significant Learning be Assessed?Steven A. Stolz - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (4).
    This article argues that assessment is a central feature of teaching, particularly as a means to determine whether what has been taught has been learnt. However, I take issue with the current trend in education which places a significant amount of emphasis upon large-scale public testing, which in turn has exacerbated the ‘teaching-to-the-test’ syndrome, not to mention distorting teaching decisions that are detrimental to the overall development of student knowledge and understanding. Part of the problem with assessment in education seems (...)
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  • A narrative approach exploring philosophy in education and educational research.Steven A. Stolz & Jānis T. Ozoliņš - 2017 - Educational Studies 44 (5):578-593.
    The use of narrative – in this case a fictional dialogue – has been a time-honoured way of exploring ideas and most importantly indispensable for learning, at least since the time of the Sophists. Indeed, the dialogues of Plato exemplify this thesis because the qualities and characteristics of philosophy and philosophising are revealed through their lives. Extending on this premise, we would argue that we learn to understand both the unity and complexity of philosophy – particularly in education and educational (...)
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  • A Genealogical Analysis of the Concept of ‘Good’ Teaching: A Polemic.Steven A. Stolz - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 52 (1):144-162.
    In this essay I intentionally employ Nietzsche's genealogical method as a means to critique the complex concept of ‘good’ teaching, and at the same time reconstitute ‘good’ teaching in a form that is radically different from contemporary accounts. In order to do this, I start out by undertaking a genealogical analysis to both reveal the complicated historical development of ‘good’ teaching and also disentangle the intertwining threads that remain hidden from us so we are aware of the core threads that (...)
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  • Autonomy, emotions and desires: Some problems concerning R. F. Dearden's account of autonomy.Carolyn M. Stone - 1990 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 24 (2):271–283.
    Carolyn M Stone; Autonomy, Emotions and Desires: some problems concerning R. F. Dearden's account of autonomy, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 24, Is.
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  • Forms of reflection on central educational concepts.Jan W. Steutel - 1988 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 22 (2):163–171.
    Jan W Steutel; Forms of Reflection on Central Educational Concepts, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 22, Issue 2, 30 May 2006, Pages 163–171, https://.
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  • Wittgenstein's Impact on the Philosophy of Education.Paul Standish - 2018 - Philosophical Investigations 41 (2):223-240.
    On the strength of a clarification of the nature of philosophy of education, a critical overview is offered of Wittgenstein's impact on the field. The focus then narrows to give attention to Wittgenstein's claim that “Nothing is hidden”, pitched here in a questionable relation to contemporary concerns with transparency. Familiar readings of this passage are challenged in connection with Wittgenstein's late writings on psychology, especially with regard to imagination and pretence. These are argued to be essential to the development of (...)
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  • Analysis and Anomalies in Philosophy of Education.Jonas F. Soltis - 1971 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 3 (2):37-50.
  • Respectability and Relevance: Reflections on Richard Peters and analytic philosophy of education.Ivan Snook - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (2):191-201.
    I argue that, after Dewey, Peters was the first modern philosopher of education to write material (in English) that was both philosophically respectable and relevant to the day-to-day concerns of teachers. Since then, some philosophers of education have remained (more or less) relevant but not really respectable while others have ?taken off into the skies? learning acclaim from the philosophical community but ceasing to produce anything which would be of any relevance to teachers in their work. I suggest that Peters (...)
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  • The usefulness of 'aesthetic education'.Alan Simpson - 1985 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 19 (2):273–280.
    Alan Simpson; The Usefulness of ‘Aesthetic Education’, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 19, Issue 2, 30 May 2006, Pages 273–280, https://doi.org/10.11.
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  • Revealing the Hidden Curriculum in Higher Education.José Víctor Orón Semper & Maribel Blasco - 2018 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 37 (5):481-498.
    The so-called ‘hidden curriculum’ is often presented as a counterproductive element in education, and many scholars argue that it should be eliminated, by being made explicit, in education in general and specifically in higher education. The problem of the HC has not been solved by the transition from a teacher-centered education to a student-centered educational model that takes the student’s experience as the starting point of learning. In this article we turn to several philosophers of education to propose that HC (...)
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  • Does classic school curriculum contribute to morality? Integrating school curriculum with moral and intellectual education.Arik Segev - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (1):89-98.
    Phillip Cam recently published a study on the separation between the teaching and learning of classic school curriculum on the one hand and morality on the other. He suggests an approach to integrate them. The goal of this article was to suggest a complementary alternative approach, to Cam’s. Based on a MacIntyrean paradigm, I argue that seeing the CSC as ‘practices’ would also enable that integration. This approach differs from the one proposed by Cam, since it preserves the structure of (...)
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  • Wittgenstein on rules: What follows and what does not.Elvira Schnabel - 1991 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 25 (1):83–94.
    Elvira Schnabel; Wittgenstein on Rules: what follows and what does not, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 25, Issue 1, 30 May 2006, Pages 83–94, https.
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  • Wittgenstein on Rules: what follows and what does not.Elvira Schnabel - 1991 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 25 (1):83-94.
    Elvira Schnabel; Wittgenstein on Rules: what follows and what does not, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 25, Issue 1, 30 May 2006, Pages 83–94, https.
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  • Education as Mediation Between Child and World: The Role of Wonder.Anders Schinkel - 2019 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 39 (5):479-492.
    Education as a deliberate activity and purposive process necessarily involves mediation, in the sense that the educator mediates between the child and the world. This can take different forms: the educator may function as a guide who initiates children into particular practices and domains and their modes of thinking and perceiving; or act as a filter, selecting what of the world the child encounters and how; or meet the child as representative of the adult world. I look at these types (...)
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