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  1. Enhancing the Independence of Supervisory Agencies: The Development of Courage.Howard Harris - 2003 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 12 (4):369-377.
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  • Testing the Level of Social Desirability During Job Interview on White-Collar Profession.Marek Preiss, Tereza Mejzlíková, Adéla Rudá, David Krámský & Jindra Pitáková - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Why Be Moral in a Virtual World.John McMillan & Mike King - 2017 - Journal of Practical Ethics 5 (2):30-48.
    This article considers two related and fundamental issues about morality in a virtual world. The first is whether the anonymity that is a feature of virtual worlds can shed light upon whether people are moral when they can act with impunity. The second issue is whether there are any moral obligations in a virtual world and if so what they might be. -/- Our reasons for being good are fundamental to understanding what it is that makes us moral or indeed (...)
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  • Two Conceptions of Harmony in Ancient Western and Eastern Aesthetics: "Dialectic Harmony" and "Ambiguous Harmony".Tak Lap Yeung & Tak-lap Yeung - 2020 - Journal of East-West Thought 10 (2):65-82.
    In this paper, I argue that the different understandings of “harmony”, which are rooted in ancient Greek and Chinese thought, can be recapitulated in the name of “dialectic harmony” and “ambiguous harmony” regarding the representation of the beautiful. The different understandings of the concept of harmony lead to at least two kinds of aesthetic value as well as ideality – harmony in conciliation and harmony in diversity. Through an explication of the original meaning and relation between the concept of harmony (...)
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  • COVID-19 Pandemic – Philosophical Approaches.Sfetcu Nicolae (ed.) - 2020 - Drobeta Turnu Severin: MultiMedia Publishing.
    The paper begins with a retrospective of the debates on the origin of life: the virus or the cell? The virus needs a cell for replication, instead the cell is a more evolved form on the evolutionary scale of life. In addition, the study of viruses raises pressing conceptual and philosophical questions about their nature, their classification, and their place in the biological world. The subject of pandemics is approached starting from the existentialism of Albert Camus and Sartre, the replacement (...)
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  • Pandemia COVID-19 - Abordări filosofice.Sfetcu Nicolae - 2020 - Drobeta Turnu Severin: MultiMedia Publishing.
    Lucrarea debutează cu o retrospectivă a dezbaterilor privind originea vieții: virusul sau celula? Virusul are nevoie de celulă pentru replicare, în schimb celula este o formă mai evoluată pe scara evoluționistă a vieții. În plus, studiul virușilor ridică întrebări conceptuale și filozofice presante despre natura lor, clasificarea lor, și locul lor în lumea biologică. Subiectul pandemiilor este abordat pornind de la existențialismul lui Albert Camus și Sartre, înlocuirea ritualului de excludere cu mecanismul disciplinar al lui Michel Foucault, și despre ipoteza (...)
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  • The Limitations of the Open Mind.Jeremy Fantl - 2018 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    When should you engage with difficult arguments against your cherished controversial beliefs? The primary conclusion of this book is that your obligations to engage with counterarguments are more limited than is often thought. In some standard situations, you shouldn't engage with difficult counterarguments and, if you do, you shouldn't engage with them open-mindedly. This conclusion runs counter to aspects of the Millian political tradition and political liberalism, as well as what people working in informal logic tend to say about argumentation. (...)
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  • The Eternally and Uniquely Beautiful: Dionysius the Areopagite’s Understanding of the Divine Beauty.Filip Ivanovic - 2014 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 75 (3):188-204.
    The famous and mysterious fifth century author, who wrote his works known as the Corpus Dionysiacum under the pseudonym of Dionysius the Areopagite, is one of the most controversial characters in the history of philosophy. His thought is well known for the concepts of apophatic and cataphatic theologies and hierarchy, as well as for his understanding of eros, beauty, and deification, which all greatly influenced the Areopagite’s posterity. His system is a successful amalgam of ancient philosophy and Christian doctrines. The (...)
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  • Embodiment, Collective Memory and Time.Rafael F. Narvaez - 2006 - Body and Society 12 (3):51-73.
    Although there are exceptions, most researchers on collective memory have neglected the idea that collective mnemonics involve embodied aspects and practices. And though the corpus of Collective Memory Studies (CMS) has helped us better understand how social groups relate to time, especially to the past, it has taken little notice of how embodied social actors collectively relate to time. In contrast, expanding upon the French School and the French sociological tradition, I argue for an approach that, on the one hand, (...)
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  • Nietzsche on the Diachronic Will and the Problem of Morality.Alessandra Tanesini - 2012 - European Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):652-675.
    In this paper I offer an innovative interpretation of Nietzsche's metaethical theory of value which shows him to be a kind of constitutivist. For Nietzsche, I argue, valuing is a conative attitude which institutes values, rather than tracking what is independently of value. What is characteristic of those acts of willing which institute values is that they are owned or authored. Nietzsche makes this point using the vocabulary of self-mastery. One crucial feature of those who have achieved this feat, and (...)
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  • What Does It Mean to Be an Educated Person?Naomi Hodgson - 2010 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 44 (1):109-123.
    The competition question ‘What Does It Mean To Be An Educated Person?’ is associated with a powerful and influential line of thought in the philosophy of R. S. Peters. It is a question that needs always to be asked again. I respond by asking what it means, now, to be an educated person—that is, how the value of being an educated person is currently understood, and, further, how it might be understood differently. The starting point of this paper then is (...)
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  • Ethics Within a Spiritual/ Metaphysical World View Towards Integral Value-Based Education. Western Philosophy: Plato, Kant, Rousseau and Hegel.Albert Ferrer - 2017 - Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 8 (8):65-94.
    It is well-known in Western scholarship that Rousseau has been the forerunner of integral value-based pedagogies; in any case, his name stands as one of the main educationists of the West. However, the pedagogic reflections of two major philosophers of modern Europe, Kant and Hegel, have been largely overlooked, especially in the last decades. Dr. Ferrer shows in this paper that Kant and Hegel can also be regarded as forerunners of holistic value-based pedagogies. Their enlightening contributions to philosophy of education (...)
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  • Family Values and the Value of the Family.Colin Wringe - 1994 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 28 (1):77–88.
  • Return of the Teacher.Nigel Tubbs - 2003 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 35 (1):71–88.
  • From West to East and Back Again: Faith, Doubt and Education in Hermann Hesse's Later Work.Peter Roberts - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (2):249-268.
    This paper examines Hermann Hesse's penultimate novel, The Journey to the East, from an educational point of view. Hesse was a man of the West who turned to the idea of 'the East' in seeking to understand himself and his society. While highly critical of elements of Western modernism, Hesse nonetheless viewed 'the East' through Western lenses and drew inspiration from other Western thinkers. At the end of The Journey to the East, the main character, H.H., believes he has found (...)
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  • Virtue and Austerity.Peter Allmark - 2013 - Nursing Philosophy 14 (1):45-52.
    Virtue ethics is often proposed as a third way in health‐care ethics, that while consequentialism and deontology focus on action guidelines, virtue focuses on character; all three aim to help agents discern morally right action although virtue seems to have least to contribute to political issues, such as austerity. I claim: This is a bad way to characterize virtue ethics. The 20th century renaissance of virtue ethics was first proposed as a response to the difficulty of making sense of ‘moral (...)
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  • Reflecting Reflective Practice.Simone Galea - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (3):245-258.
    This paper demystifies reflective practice on teaching by focusing on the idea of reflection itself and how it has been conceived by two philosophers, Plato and Irigaray. It argues that reflective practice has become a standardized method of defining the teacher in teacher education and teacher accreditation systems. It explores how practices of reflection themselves can suggest ways out of dictated pathways of reflection in teaching. Drawing on Luce Irigaray's and Plato's ideas on reflection, the paper includes a critical overview (...)
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  • The Hatred of Public Schooling: The School as the Mark of Democracy.Maarten Simons - 2010 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (5-6):666-682.
    This article takes up a text that Rancière published shortly after The Ignorant School Master appeared in French, 'École, production, égalité'[School, Production, Equality] (1988), in which he sketched the school as being preeminently the place of equality. In this vein, and opposed to the story of the school as the place where inequality is reproduced and therefore in need of reform, the article wants to recount the story of the school as the invention of a site of equality and as (...)
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  • Creating Public Values: Schools as Moral Habitats.Ozoliņš Jānis John Tālivaldis - 2010 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (4):410-423.
    This paper will consider the role of schools, as a particular moral habitat in the formation of moral virtues and how the inculcation of a comprehensive private moral system of beliefs, values and practices leads to public values in a multicultural, pluralist society. It is argued that the formation of good persons ensures the formation of good citizens and that governments should therefore support good moral education rather than seek to impose national public values or to concentrate on developing good (...)
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  • Thinking Critically About Critical Thinking.Jennifer Wilson Mulnix - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (5):464-479.
    As a philosophy professor, one of my central goals is to teach students to think critically. However, one difficulty with determining whether critical thinking can be taught, or even measured, is that there is widespread disagreement over what critical thinking actually is. Here, I reflect on several conceptions of critical thinking, subjecting them to critical scrutiny. I also distinguish critical thinking from other forms of mental processes with which it is often conflated. Next, I present my own conception of critical (...)
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  • Education and Values.Glenn Langford - 1988 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 22 (2):283–283.
  • Enhancing the Independence of Supervisory Agencies: The Development of Courage.Howard Harris - 2003 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 12 (4):369–377.
  • The Many Identities of Pedagogics as a Challenge: Towards an Ontology of Pedagogical Research as Pedagogical Practice.Jan Bengtsson - 2006 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (2):115–128.
    The history of pedagogics gives the impression that pedagogics has never had an identity of its own. Throughout history it has borrowed its identity from philosophy, theology, psychology and sociology. Against the background of this historical challenge, the article proposes pedagogical practice as an alternative identity to pedagogics, although not in the classical sense of an absolute and self‐sufficient identity, and it develops one particular ontological theory of pedagogical practice viewed from a life‐world approach with the ambition of suggesting a (...)
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  • Introduction: Philosophy of Education in the Nordic Countries at the Turn of the Millennium.Jan Bengtsson - 2006 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (2):109–113.
  • The Unacknowledged Socrates in the Works of Luce Irigaray.Shaun O'Dwyer - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (2):28-44.
    : In Luce Irigaray's thought, Socrates is a marginal figure compared to Plato or Hegel. However, she does identify the Socratic dialectical position as that of a 'phallocrat' and she does conflate Socratic and Platonic philosophy in her psychoanalytic reading of Plato in Speculum of the Other Woman. In this essay, I critically interpret both Irigaray's own texts and the Platonic dialogues in order to argue that: (1) the Socratic dialectical position is not 'phallocratic' by Irigaray's own understanding of the (...)
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  • Some May Beg to Differ: Individual Beliefs and Group Political Claims.Martin Lipscomb - 2013 - Nursing Philosophy 14 (4):254-270.
    While nurses can and do behave as intentional political agents, claims that nurses collectively do , should or must act to advance political objectives lack credibility. This paper challenges the coherence and legitimacy of political demands placed upon nurses. It is not suggested that nurses ought not to contribute to political discourse and activity. That would be foolish. However, the idea that nursing can own or exhibit a general political will is discarded. It is suggested that to protect and advance (...)
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  • Receptacle/ Chōra: Figuring the Errant Feminine in Plato's Timaeus.Emanuela Bianchi - 2001 - Hypatia 21 (4):124-146.
    This essay undertakes a reexamination of the notion of the receptacle/chōra in Plato's Timaeus, asking what its value may be to feminists seeking to understand the topology of the feminine in Western philosophy. As the source of cosmic motion as well as a restless figurality, labile and polyvocal, the receptacle/chōra offers a fecund zone of destabilization that allows for an immanent critique of ancient metaphysics. Engaging with Derridean, Irigarayan, and Kristevan analyses, Bianchi explores whether receptacle/chōra can exceed its reduction to (...)
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  • Pregnancy Leave, Comparable Worth, And Concepts of Equality.Marjorie Weinzweig - 1987 - Hypatia 2 (1):71-101.
    Pregnancy leave and comparable worth deal with differences between female and male employees. In each case feminists are divided as to whether special treatment for women will promote equality or reinforce sex stereotypes and gender based segregation in the workplace. A radical restructuring of the workplace is necessary, to make possible a more human life for men and women. This restructuring is articulated in terms of the concepts of equality as "participation" or "incorporation" of all individuals into a community, and (...)
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  • Poetry as Offence.Michael A. Peters - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (2):129-132.
  • Whistleblowing in a Changing Legal Climate: Is It Time to Revisit Our Approach to Trust and Loyalty at the Workplace?David Lewis - 2011 - Business Ethics: A European Review 20 (1):71-87.
    This article suggests that the introduction of employment protection rights for whistleblowers has implications for the way in which trust and loyalty should be viewed at the workplace. In particular, it is argued that the very existence of legislative provisions in the United Kingdom reinforces the notion that whistleblowing should not be regarded as either deviant or disloyal behaviour. Thus, the internal reporting of concerns can be seen as an act of trust and loyalty in drawing the employer's attention to (...)
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  • Nursing and Justice as a Basic Human Need.Megan-Jane Johnstone - 2011 - Nursing Philosophy 12 (1):34-44.
  • Four Educators in Plato's Theaetetus.Avi I. Mintz - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (4):657-673.
    Scholars who have taken interest in Theaetetus' educational theme argue that Plato contrasts an inferior, even dangerous, sophistic education to a superior, philosophical, Socratic education. I explore the contrasting exhortations, methods, ideals and epistemological foundations of Socratic and Protagorean education and suggest that Socrates' treatment of Protagoras as educator is far less dismissive than others claim. Indeed, Plato, in Theaetetus, offers a qualified defence of both Socrates and Protagoras. Socrates and Protagoras each dwell in the middle ground between the extremes (...)
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  • The Aesthetics of Utopia: Creation, Creativity and a Critical Theory of Design.Richard Howells - 2014 - Thesis Eleven 123 (1):41-61.
    This article combines critical, visual and aesthetic theory to argue that the very act of design is a Utopian process. Crucially, the Utopian dimension is not simply a matter of subject matter or utility. Rather, it lies in the act of formal arrangement and composition, and therefore can apply to visual texts with no apparent subject matter at all. The argument is grounded in Ernst Bloch’s critical theory of Utopia, which sees Utopia as a process rather than a destination. It (...)
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  • A View From Somewhere: Explaining the Paradigms of Educational Research.Hanan A. Alexander - 2006 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (2):205–221.
    In this paper I ask how educational researchers can believe the subjective perceptions of qualitative participant-observers given the concern for objectivity and generalisability of experimental research in the behavioural and social sciences. I critique the most common answer to this question within the educational research community, which posits the existence of two (or more) equally legitimate epistemological paradigms—positivism and constructivism—and offer an alternative that places a priority in educational research on understanding the purposes and meanings humans attribute to educational practices. (...)
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  • “Standing Apart in the Shelter of the City Wall”: The Contemplative Ideal Vs. The Politically Engaged Philosopher in Plato's Political Theory.Catherine McKeen - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (2):197-216.
    Natural philosophers seem to have good reasons to prefer that the kallipolis, the maximally just community of the Republic, is never realized. If such a community is realized, philosophers are under the obligation of a just demand that they govern. However, a life that contains governance as a significant part is not the happiest life a philosopher can live. The happiest life for a philosopher is one consisting entirely or largely in philosophical contemplation. I confront this puzzle by arguing that (...)
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  • To Lie or to Mislead?Felix Timmermann & Emanuel Viebahn - 2021 - Philosophical Studies 178 (5):1481-1501.
    The aim of this paper is to argue that lying differs from mere misleading in a way that can be morally relevant: liars commit themselves to something they believe to be false, while misleaders avoid such commitment, and this difference can make a moral difference. Even holding all else fixed, a lie can therefore be morally worse than a corresponding misleading utterance. But, we argue, there are also cases in which the difference in commitment makes lying morally better than misleading, (...)
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  • The Movement of Repetition: Incorporation Through Mimetic, Ritual and Imaginative Movements.Christoph Wulf - 2020 - Gestalt Theory 42 (2):87-100.
    Summary The movement of repetition is irrevocably linked to the constitution of the human body and is therefore a human condition. The process of hominisation makes this clear. In the body of Homo sapiens and in his movements a connection between nature and culture is created. The movement of repetition is of central importance. Repetition is essential for the evolution of Homo sapiens, the development of communities and individuals. Repetitions are mimetic; they lead to productive imitations in which new elements (...)
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  • Beyond Mind III: Further Steps to a Metatranspersonal Philosophy and Psychology.Elías Capriles - 2009 - International Journal of Transpersonal Studies 28 (2):1-145.
    This paper gives continuity to the criticism, undertaken in two papers previously published in this journal, of transpersonal systems that fail to discriminate between nirvanic, samsaric, and neithernirvanic-nor-samsaric transpersonal states, and which present the absolute sanity of Awakening as a dualistic, conceptually-tainted condition. It also gives continuity to the denunciation of the false disjunction between ontogenically ascending and descending paths, while showing the truly significant disjunction to be between existentially ascending and metaexistentially descending paths. However, whereas in the preceding paper (...)
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  • Are Human Rights Redundant in the Ethical Codes of Psychologists?Alfred Allan - 2013 - Ethics and Behavior 23 (4):251-265.
    The codes of ethics and conduct of a number of psychology bodies explicitly refer to human rights, and the American Psychological Association recently expanded the use of the construct when it amended standard 1.02 of the Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct. What is unclear is how these references to human rights should be interpreted. In this article I examine the historical development of human rights and associated constructs and the contemporary meaning of human rights. As human rights (...)
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  • Learning About Wisdom From Lehrer.Nenad Miščević - 2012 - Philosophical Studies 161 (1):59-68.
    The paper discusses Lehrer's pioneering approach to the topic of wisdom. His pithy proposal, that wisdom is preference of merit justified by an evaluation system and undefeated by error, fits well within the grand philosophical tradition of thinking about wisdom, offering a very clear and original formulation of its target. The first part of the paper puts it on a map of philosophical options concerning wisdom (anthropo-, theo- and cosmo-centric ones) and then raises questions about it: does preference have to (...)
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  • Editorial.Richard Smith - 2013 - Ethics and Education 8 (1):1-2.
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  • Trust and Confidence: History, Theory and Socio-Political Implications. [REVIEW]Christian Morgner - 2013 - Human Studies 36 (4):509-532.
    Even before trust became a buzzword, theoretical developments were made, which have instigated the development of two forms of trust which are described as personal trust and system trust/confidence. However, this distinction remained rather secondary in the overall literature. There is an overall lack on the historical developments of these forms of trust, their internal logic and how they interlink, overlap, or work against each other. The paper aims to advance these three aspects: first through a historical overview of the (...)
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  • One Justice or Two? A Model of Reconciliation of Normative Justice Theories and Empirical Research on Organizational Justice.Natàlia Cugueró-Escofet & Marion Fortin - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (3):1-17.
    Management scholars and social scientists investigate dynamics of subjective fairness perceptions in the workplace under the umbrella term “organizational justice.” Philosophers and ethicists, on the other hand, think of justice as a normative requirement in societal relationships with conflicting interests. Both ways of looking at justice have neither remained fully separated nor been clearly integrated. It seems that much could be gained and learned by more closely integrating the ethical and the empirical fields of justice. On the other hand, it (...)
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  • The Shimmering Shining: The Promise of Art in Heidegger and Nietzsche.Timothy Freeman - 2013 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 5 (1):49-66.
    In response to Hegel’s thesis concerning the “end of art,” John Sallis suggests that the future or the “promise of art” may be opened in thinking through Heidegger’s essay “The Origin of the Work of Art.” Sallis proposes that this promise of art may lie in the capacity to “set forth various elements through transfigurement into shining.” In this paper I reflect on what this suggestion concerning the promise of art may mean. Furthermore, I propose that “The Origin of the (...)
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  • Christianity's Mixed Contributions to Children's Rights.Don S. Browning & John Witte - 2011 - Zygon 46 (3):713-732.
    Abstract. In this paper, which was among Don Browning's last writings before he died, we review and evaluate the main arguments against the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (the “CRC”) that conservative American Christians in particular have opposed. While we take their objections seriously, we think that, on balance, the CRC is worthy of ratification, especially if it is read in light of the profamily ethic that informs the CRC and many earlier human rights instruments. More (...)
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  • Alief in Action (and Reaction).Tamar Szabó Gendler - 2008 - Mind and Language 23 (5):552--585.
    I introduce and argue for the importance of a cognitive state that I call alief. An alief is, to a reasonable approximation, an innate or habitual propensity to respond to an apparent stimulus in a particular way. Recognizing the role that alief plays in our cognitive repertoire provides a framework for understanding reactions that are governed by nonconscious or automatic mechanisms, which in turn brings into proper relief the role played by reactions that are subject to conscious regulation and deliberate (...)
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  • Why the Negation Problem Is Not a Problem for Expressivism.Jeremy Schwartz & Christopher Hom - 2014 - Noûs 48 (2):824-845.
    The Negation Problem states that expressivism has insufficient structure to account for the various ways in which a moral sentence can be negated. We argue that the Negation Problem does not arise for expressivist accounts of all normative language but arises only for the specific examples on which expressivists usually focus. In support of this claim, we argue for the following three theses: 1) a problem that is structurally identical to the Negation Problem arises in non-normative cases, and this problem (...)
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  • Self‐Sacrifice, Self‐Transcendence and Nurses' Professional Self.Elizabeth J. Pask - 2005 - Nursing Philosophy 6 (4):247-254.
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  • The Nature of Reality Represented in High Fidelity Human Patient Simulation: Philosophical Perspectives and Implications for Nursing Education.Renee M. Dunnington - 2014 - Nursing Philosophy 15 (1):14-22.
    Simulation technology is increasingly being used in nursing education. Previously used primarily for teaching procedural, instrumental, or critical incident types of skills, simulation is now being applied to training related to more dynamic, complex, and interpersonal human contexts. While high fidelity human patient simulators have significantly increased in authenticity, human responses have greater complexity and are qualitatively different than current technology represents. This paper examines the texture of representation by simulation. Through a tracing of historical and contemporary philosophical perspectives on (...)
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  • The Micro-Fascism of Plato?S Good Citizen: Producing (Dis)Order Through the Construction of Risk.Patrick O.?Byrne & Dave Holmes - 2007 - Nursing Philosophy 8 (2):92-101.