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  1. Opinions of nurses regarding Euthanasia and Medically Assisted Suicide.Tamara Raquel Velasco Sanz, Ana María Cabrejas Casero, Yolanda Rodríguez González, José Antonio Barbado Albaladejo, Lydia Frances Mower Hanlon & María Isabel Guerra Llamas - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (7-8):1721-1738.
    BackgroundSafeguarding the right to die according to the principles of autonomy and freedom of each person has become more important in the last decade, therefore increasing regulation of Euthanasi...
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  • Exploring the ethics of physical restraints: Students’ questioning.Maki Tanaka - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics.
    Background Physical restraints are routinely employed to ensure patient safety in Japanese acute care. Little is known about nursing students' perspectives and how they begin to question their value and knowledge in the face of restraint experiences in clinical practice. Objective To investigate nursing students’ questions about patient restraints and how they understand the ethics of the use of restraints in nursing. Research design Qualitative descriptive research using narrative analysis. Participants and research context Experiential data were generated and thematically analyzed (...)
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  • Anticipated impacts of voluntary assisted dying legislation on nursing practice.Jessica T. Snir, Danielle N. Ko, Bridget Pratt & Rosalind McDougall - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (6):1386-1400.
    Background: The Voluntary Assisted Dying Act 2017 passed into law in Victoria, Australia, on the 29 November 2017. Internationally, nurses have been shown to be intimately involved in patient care throughout the voluntary assisted dying process. However, there is a paucity of research exploring Australian nurses’ perspectives on voluntary assisted dying and, in particular, how Victorian nurses anticipate the implementation of this ethically controversial legislation will impact their professional lives. Objectives: To explore Victorian nurses’ expectations of the ethical and practical (...)
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  • But it’s legal, isn’t it? Law and ethics in nursing practice related to medical assistance in dying.Catharine J. Schiller, Barbara Pesut, Josette Roussel & Madeleine Greig - 2019 - Nursing Philosophy 20 (4).
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  • Norwegian nurses' perceptions of assisted dying requests from terminally ill patients—A qualitative interview study.Hege Hol, Solfrid Vatne, Kjell Erik Strømskag, Aud Orøy & Anne Marie Mork Rokstad - 2023 - Nursing Inquiry 30 (1):e12517.
    This study explores the perceptions of Norwegian nurses who have received assisted dying requests from terminally ill patients. Assisted dying is illegal in Norway, while in some countries, it is an option. Nurses caring for terminally ill patients may experience ethical challenges by receiving requests for euthanasia and assisted suicide. We applied a qualitative research design with a phenomenological hermeneutic approach using open individual interviews. A total of 15 registered nurses employed in pulmonary and oncology wards of three university hospitals (...)
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  • Nurses’ values on medical aid in dying: A qualitative analysis.Judy E. Davidson, Liz Stokes, Marcia S. DeWolf Bosek, Martha Turner, Genesis Bojorquez, Youn-Shin Lee & Michele Upvall - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):636-650.
    Aim: Explore nurses’ values and perceptions regarding the practice of medical aid in dying. Background: Medical aid in dying is becoming increasing legal in the United States. The laws and American Nurses Association documents limit nursing involvement in this practice. Nurses’ values regarding this controversial topic are poorly understood. Methodology: Cross-sectional electronic survey design sent to nurse members of the American Nurses Association. Inductive thematic content analysis was applied to open-ended comments. Ethical Considerations: Approved by the institutional review board. Participants: (...)
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