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Kant's Transcendental Arguments

In Edward Zalta (ed.), The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Stanford (2009)

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  1. Changing Philosophy Through Technology: Complexity and Computer-Supported Collaborative Argument Mapping.Michael H. G. Hoffmann - 2015 - Philosophy and Technology 28 (2):167-188.
    Technology is not only an object of philosophical reflection but also something that can change this reflection. This paper discusses the potential of computer-supported argument visualization tools for coping with the complexity of philosophical arguments. I will show, in particular, how the interactive and web-based argument mapping software “AGORA-net” can change the practice of philosophical reflection, communication, and collaboration. AGORA-net allows the graphical representation of complex argumentations in logical form and the synchronous and asynchronous collaboration on those “argument maps” on (...)
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  • Revisiting Metaphilosophical Naturalism and Naturalized Transcendentalism: Response to Kaidesoja.Dustin McWherter - 2017 - Journal of Critical Realism 16 (5):514-532.
    In this article, I assess Tuukka Kaidesoja’s response to my objections to his critique of transcendental arguments and respond to his criticisms of my work. I argue that his new attempt to link transcendental arguments to Kant’s transcendental idealism is just as question-begging as his previous attempt, that his problematization of Bhaskar’s use of Kantian terminology is premised upon a confusion, and that his elaboration of explanatory necessity still fails to clearly distinguish it from transcendental necessity. I also elaborate and (...)
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  • On Kant’s Transcendental Argument(S).Sergey Katrechko - 2016 - Con-Textos Kantianos 4:98-117.
    Presented in the “Critique of Pure Reason” transcendental philosophy is the first theory of science,which seeks to identify and study the conditions of the possibility of cognition. Thus, Kant carries out a shift to the study of ‘mode of our cognition’ and TP is a method, where transcendental argumentation acts as its essential basis. The article is devoted to the analysis of the transcendental arguments. In § 2 the background of ТА — transcendental method of Antiquity and Leibniz’s Principle of (...)
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  • Transcendental Arguments, Conceivability, and Global Vs. Local Skepticism.Moti Mizrahi - 2017 - Philosophia 45 (2):735-749.
    In this paper, I argue that, if transcendental arguments are to proceed from premises that are acceptable to the skeptic, the Transcendental Premise, according to which “X is a metaphysically necessary condition for the possibility of Y,” must be grounded in considerations of conceivability and possibility. More explicitly, the Transcendental Premise is based on what Szabó Gendler and Hawthorne call the “conceivability-possibility move.” This “inconceivability-impossibility” move, however, is a problematic argumentative move when advancing transcendental arguments for the following reasons. First, (...)
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  • Natural Kinds and Naturalised Kantianism.Michela Massimi - 2014 - Noûs 48 (3):416-449.
  • Introduction: Kant’s Philosophical Method and Contemporary Perspectives in Epistemology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of Mind, Philosophy of Science and Ethics.Gabriele Gava - 2021 - Synthese 198 (Suppl 13):3107-3111.
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  • Objective Information in the Empiricist View of von Weizsäcker.Iman Khatam & Afshin Shafiee - 2014 - Foundations of Science 19 (3):241-255.
    We analyze von Weizsäcker’s view regarding the concept of information in physics. In his view, information arises from the reduction of properties of a physical object to their logical descriptive propositions. The smallest element of a lattice of propositions is an atom of information which is considered as the essence of every physical identity including position space. von Weizsäcker calls this element, “ur”. Moreover, Biological evolution is described in terms of enhancement of the variety of forms. Form could be also (...)
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