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  1. Self-Love or Diffidence? Malebranche and Hume on the Love of Fame.Alison McIntyre & Julie Walsh - 2022 - Journal of Modern Philosophy 4 (1):2.
    Hume’s discussion of pride and sympathy in the _Treatise_ shows direct engagement with Malebranche’s discussion of ‘imitation’ in the _Search_. For Malebranche, imitation—both of passions and belief—and our tendency to judge ourselves by comparison, generate the passion of pride or grandeur, which plays a useful social role. However, as both cause and effect of the admiration of others, grandeur is ungrounded and thus imaginary. Hume disagrees. He invokes the principle of sympathy to explain how the evaluations of others can support (...)
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  • Hume is the Enemy of Pyrrho.Dominic K. Dimech - 2021 - Philosophy 96 (4):651-674.
    I offer reasons against reading Hume as a Pyrrhonian sceptic. I argue that Hume's scepticism is motivated differently, that his sceptical strategies are not analogous to Pyrrhonism's, and that it is profitable to read Hume as a critic of Pyrrhonism. I hold that the most informative point of comparison between Hume and Sextus Empiricus is a point of difference, namely, their stands on the connection between suspension of judgement and tranquillity. For Sextus, tranquillity flows naturally from suspending judgement on all (...)
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  • A Plea for an Integrated Historiography of Natural and Moral Philosophy in Enlightenment Scotland: A Programmatic Essay.Tamás Demeter - 2022 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 20 (3):183-202.
    I begin with a diagnosis. Present-day scholarly work on the Scottish Enlightenment is bifurcated: it is either focused on the areas of moral philosophy or of natural philosophy, broadly construed in both cases. The aspiration to combine these inquiries is rare and unsystematic. This paper makes a case for the need and possibility of a perspective that conceives moral and natural inquiry as integrated enterprises in the period. It also suggests that potentially useful interpretive devices can be adopted from the (...)
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  • Marching on the Capital: Hume's Experimental Science of Man as a Conquest for Occupied Territory.Gabriel Watts - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (3):233-255.
    In this paper I set out what I call a ‘conquest’ conception of Hume's experimental science of man. It is notable, I claim, that Hume regards what he calls the ‘capital’ of the sciences – ‘the science of MAN’ – as occupied territory, and that he views his ‘direct’ method of approach upon the science of human nature as a ‘conquest’. I expand upon such statements by leveraging the comparison that Hume draws between experimental moral philosophy and the experimental tradition (...)
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  • The Language of Sympathy: Hume on Communication.Anik Waldow - 2020 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 28 (2):296-317.
    By placing Hume’s account of communication in the context of some less known seventeenth- and eighteenth-century French resources on rhetoric and language, this essay argues that Hume based his und...
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  • The Notorious Dr. Middleton: David Hume and the Ninewells Years.Tim Stuart-Buttle - forthcoming - History of European Ideas:1-28.
  • Hume’s Thoroughly Relationist Ontology of Time.Matias Slavov - 2021 - Metaphysica 22 (2):173-188.
    I argue that Hume’s philosophy of time is relationist in the following two senses. 1) Standard definition of relationism. Time is a succession of indivisible moments. Hence there is no time independent of change. Time is a relational, not substantial feature of the world. 2) Rigid relationism. There is no evidence of uniform natural standard for synchronization of clocks. No absolute temporal metric is available. There are countless times, and no time is privileged. Combining 1) and 2) shows that Hume’s (...)
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