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  1. Presença de Agostinho na test de Tomás de Aquino sobre o Conhecimento Humano: A Primeira parte da Suma de Teologia.André de Deus Berger - 2012 - Dissertation, UFSCAR, Brazil
  • Intentionality in Ancient Philosophy.Victor Caston - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • Intentionality: Some Lessons From the History of the Problem From Brentano to the Present.Dermot Moran - 2013 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 21 (3):317-358.
    Intentionality (?directedness?, ?aboutness?) is both a central topic in contemporary philosophy of mind, phenomenology and the cognitive sciences, and one of the themes with which both analytic and Continental philosophers have separately engaged starting from Brentano and Edmund Husserl?s ground-breaking Logical Investigations (1901) through Roderick M. Chisholm, Daniel C. Dennett?s The Intentional Stance, John Searle?s Intentionality, to the recent work of Tim Crane, Robert Brandom, Shaun Gallagher and Dan Zahavi, among many others. In this paper, I shall review recent discussions (...)
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  • ¿Tienen los animales no humanos un yo? Una posible respuesta desde la filosofía de la mente de Avicena.Luis Xavier López-Farjeat - 2013 - Signos Filosóficos 15 (30):71-88.
    En varios pasajes de sus obras psicológicas, Avicena sugiere que los animales no humanos tienen un yo. Aquí argumentaré que, a partir de las características que le atribuye a la percepción, hay razones de peso para sospechar que los animales no humanos efectivamente tienen un yo: el impulso natural en ellos hacia la supervivencia, la familiaridad con su propio cuerpo, su capacidad para tender hacia aquello que les resulta conveniente y huir de lo peligroso de acuerdo con sus propias circunstancias, (...)
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  • Colloquium 7: Attention Deficit in Plotinus and Augustine: Psychological Problems in Christian and Platonist Theories of the Grades of Virtue.Charles Brittain - 2003 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 18 (1):223-275.
  • Robert Kilwardby.José Filipe Silva - 2012 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy:1-35.
  • Aristotle’s Naïve Somatism.Alain E. Ducharme - unknown
    Aristotle’s Naïve Somatism is a re-interpretation of Aristotle’s cognitive psychology in light of certain presuppositions he holds about the living animal body. The living animal body is presumed to be sensitive, and Aristotle grounds his account of cognition in a rudimentary proprioceptive awareness one has of her body. With that presupposed metaphysics under our belts, we are in a position to see that Aristotle in de Anima has a di erent explanatory aim in view than that which the literature generally (...)
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  • Recent Work on the Philosophy of Duns Scotus.Richard Cross - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (8):667-675.
    This article highlights five areas of Scotus' philosophy that have recently been the subject of scholarly discussion. (1) Metaphysics : I outline the most current accounts of Scotus on individuation (thisness or haecceity) and the common nature. (2) Modal theory : I consider recent accounts both of Scotus' innovations in spelling out the notion of the logically (and broadly logically) possible, and of his account of the independence of modality. (3) Cognitive psychology : I examine recent views of Scotus' theory (...)
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  • Mirrors for Princes.Roberto Lambertini - 2011 - In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. pp. 791--797.
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  • Ibn Bājja, Abū Bakr Ibn Al-Sāʾiġ (Avempace).Marc Geoffroy - 2011 - In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. pp. 483--483.
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  • Aristotle on Various Types of Alteration in De Anima II 5.John Bowin - 2011 - Phronesis 56 (2):138-161.
    In De Anima II 5, 417a21-b16, Aristotle makes a number of distinctions between types of transitions, affections, and alterations. The objective of this paper is to sort out the relationships between these distinctions by means of determining which of the distinguished types of change can be coextensive and which cannot, and which can overlap and which cannot. From the results of this analysis, an interpretation of 417a21-b16 is then constructed that differs from previous interpretations in certain important respects, chief among (...)
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  • Colloquium 1: Aristotle’s Psychological Theory.David Charles - 2009 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):1-49.
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  • Medieval Vs Contemporary Metaphysics and Logic of Intentionality.Andrzej Bułeczka - 2017 - Dissertation,
    This thesis addresses three challenges posed by intentionality - the ability of our mental states and language to be about something - to a logician: an apparent reference to non-existent objects, intentional indeterminacy and the failure of substitutivity of coextensive terms in an intentional context. Since intentionality plays an important role in our everyday reasoning, a proper formal account of it is highly desirable, yet it requires a departure from classical logic. One can modify classical logic and adapt the formal (...)
     
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  • Colloquium 5: Plato’s Anti-Hedonism.Gunter Figal - 2008 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 23 (1):187-204.