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  1. Principle Versus Profit: Debating Human Rights Sanctions.Stephanie Chan - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (1):45-71.
    Economic sanctions are a primary tool the US government and international organizations use to promote human rights abroad, yet they have proven to be largely ineffective and harmful to civilians. There is accumulating evidence that this paradox may be explained by the expressive purposes of sanctions and domestic politics. This article further explores these explanations by examining human rights sanction policy debates. Specifically, I analyzed 27 US Congressional hearings on human rights policy toward China. I argue that moral pressure enabled (...)
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  • Political Effectiveness, Negative Externalities, and the Ethics of Economic Sanctions.Dursun Peksen - 2019 - Ethics and International Affairs 33 (3):279-289.
    As part of the roundtable “Economic Sanctions and Their Consequences,” this essay discusses whether economic sanctions are morally acceptable policy tools. It notes that both conventional and targeted sanctions not only often fail to achieve their stated objectives but also bring about significant negative externalities in target countries. Economic dislocation and increases in political instability instigated by sanctions disproportionately affect the well-being of opposition groups and marginalized segments of society, while target elites and their support base remain insulated from the (...)
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