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  1. Ethical Decision-Making and Professional Behaviour Among Nurses: A Correlational Study.Birgül Cerit & Leyla Dinç - 2013 - Nursing Ethics 20 (2):200-212.
    This study examined the relationship between nurses’ ethical decision-making levels and their professional behaviours. Data were collected from 225 nurses who were recruited from university hospitals in Ankara using proportionate sampling. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and Pearson correlations. Most of the nurses were familiar with ethical dilemmas in nursing practice. The Nursing Principled Thinking level was above average, while the Practical Consideration level was average. Nurses’ professionalism level was low. There was a positive but weak correlation between professional (...)
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  • Severity and Frequency of Moral Distress Among Midwives Working in Birth Centers.Shahrzad Zolala, Amir Almasi-Hashiani & Forouzan Akrami - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301879668.
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  • Ethical Decision-Making Climate, Moral Distress, and Intention to Leave Among ICU Professionals in a Tertiary Academic Hospital Center.Michele Zimmer, Julie Landon, Samantha Dove, Kerri Bouchard, Eunsung Cho, Melissa Davis-Gilbert, Rachel Hausladen, Karen McQuillan, Ali Tabatabai, Trishna Mukherjee, Raya Kheirbek, Samuel Tisherman, Tracey Wilson & Henry Silverman - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1):1-15.
    BackgroundCommentators believe that the ethical decision-making climate is instrumental in enhancing interprofessional collaboration in intensive care units. Our aim was twofold: to determine the perception of the ethical climate, levels of moral distress, and intention to leave one's job among nurses and physicians, and between the different ICU types and determine the association between the ethical climate, moral distress, and intention to leave.MethodsWe performed a cross-sectional questionnaire study between May 2021 and August 2021 involving 206 nurses and physicians in a (...)
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  • Beyond Moral Distress: Preserving the Ethical Integrity of Nurses.Martin Woods - 2014 - Nursing Ethics 21 (2):127-128.
  • Aims and Harvest of Moral Case Deliberation.Froukje C. Weidema, Bert Ac Molewijk, Frans Kamsteeg & Guy Am Widdershoven - 2013 - Nursing Ethics 20 (6):617-631.
    Deliberative ways of dealing with ethical issues in health care are expanding. Moral case deliberation is an example, providing group-wise, structured reflection on dilemmas from practice. Although moral case deliberation is well described in literature, aims and results of moral case deliberation sessions are unknown. This research shows (a) why managers introduce moral case deliberation and (b) what moral case deliberation participants experience as moral case deliberation results. A responsive evaluation was conducted, explicating moral case deliberation experiences by analysing aims (...)
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  • Organizational Influences on Health Professionals’ Experiences of Moral Distress in PICUs.Sarah Wall, Wendy J. Austin & Daniel Garros - 2016 - HEC Forum 28 (1):53-67.
    This article reports the findings of a qualitative study that explored the organizational influences on moral distress for health professionals working in pediatric intensive care units across Canada. Participants were recruited to the study from PICUs across Canada. The PICU is a high-tech, fast-paced, high-pressure environment where caregivers frequently face conflict and ethical tension in the care of critically ill children. A number of themes including relationships with management, organizational structure and processes, workload and resources, and team dynamics were identified. (...)
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  • Nurses' Perceptions of and Responses to Morally Distressing Situations.C. Varcoe, B. Pauly, J. Storch, L. Newton & K. Makaroff - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (4):488-500.
    Research on moral distress has paid limited attention to nurses’ responses and actions. In a survey of nurses’ perceptions of moral distress and ethical climate, 292 nurses answered three open-ended questions about situations that they considered morally distressing. Participants identified a range of situations as morally distressing, including witnessing unnecessary suffering, being forced to provide care that compromised values, and negative judgments about patients. They linked these situations to contextual constraints such as workload and described responses, including feeling incompetent and (...)
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  • Moral Distress and Ethical Climate in Intensive Care Medicine During COVID-19: A Nationwide Study.Walther N. K. A. van Mook, Sebastiaan A. Pronk, Iwan van der Horst, Elien Pragt, Ruth Heijnen-Panis, Hans Kling, Nathalie M. van Dijk, Math J. J. M. Candel, Vincent J. H. S. Gilissen & Moniek A. Donkers - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-12.
    BackgroundThe COVID-19 pandemic has created ethical challenges for intensive care unit professionals, potentially causing moral distress. This study explored the levels and causes of moral distress and the ethical climate in Dutch ICUs during COVID-19.MethodsAn extended version of the Measurement of Moral Distress for Healthcare Professionals and Ethical Decision Making Climate Questionnaire were online distributed among all 84 ICUs. Moral distress scores in nurses and intensivists were compared with the historical control group one year before COVID-19. ResultsThree hundred forty-five nurses, (...)
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  • “Here’s My Dilemma”. Moral Case Deliberation as a Platform for Discussing Everyday Ethics in Elderly Care.S. van der Dam, T. A. Abma, M. J. M. Kardol & G. A. M. Widdershoven - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (3):250-267.
    Our study presents an overview of the issues that were brought forward by participants of a moral case deliberation (MCD) project in two elderly care organizations. The overview was inductively derived from all case descriptions (N = 202) provided by participants of seven mixed MCD groups, consisting of care providers from various professional backgrounds, from nursing assistant to physician. The MCD groups were part of a larger MCD project within two care institutions (residential homes and nursing homes). Care providers are (...)
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  • Validation of the Hospital Ethical Climate Survey for Older People Care.Riitta Suhonen, Minna Stolt, Jouko Katajisto, Andreas Charalambous & Linda L. Olson - 2015 - Nursing Ethics 22 (5):517-532.
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  • Take Me to My Leader.Janet Storch, Kara Schick Makaroff, Bernie Pauly & Lorelei Newton - 2013 - Nursing Ethics 20 (2):150-157.
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  • Professional Dignity in Nursing in Clinical and Community Workplaces.Alessandro Stievano, Maria Grazia De Marinis, Maria Teresa Russo, Gennaro Rocco & Rosaria Alvaro - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (3):341-356.
    The purpose of this qualitative study was to analyse nurses’ professional dignity in their everyday working lives. We explored the factors that affect nursing professional dignity in practice that emerge in relationships with health professionals, among clinical nurses working in hospitals and in community settings in central Italy. The main themes identified were: nursing professional dignity perceived as an achievement; recognition of dignity beyond professional roles. These two concepts are interconnected. This study provides insights into professional dignity in nursing being (...)
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  • Financial Incentives and Moral Distress in Australian Audiologists and Audiometrists.Andrea Simpson, Meg Fawcett, Lily McLeod, Jennifer Lin, Selda Tuncer & Bojana Sarkic - forthcoming - Clinical Ethics:147775092211176.
    Introduction Financial incentive schemes have been commonly used by the hearing aid industry as a way of encouraging device sales. These schemes can lead to a conflict of interest as the hearing device dispenser is torn between personal reward over the best interests of their client. This conflict of interest has the potential for the dispenser to develop “moral distress”, a negative state of mind when an individual’s ethical values contrast with those of the employing organization. The purpose of this (...)
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  • What Actions Promote a Positive Ethical Climate? A Critical Incident Study of Nurses' Perceptions.M. Silen, S. Kjellstrom, L. Christensson, B. Sidenvall & M. Svantesson - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (4):501-512.
    Few qualitative studies explore the phenomenon of positive ethical climate and what actions are perceived as promoting it. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore and describe actions that acute care ward nurses perceive as promoting a positive ethical climate. The critical incident technique was used. Interviews were conducted with 20 nurses at wards where the ethical climate was considered positive, according to a previous study. Meeting the needs of patients and next of kin in a considerate way, (...)
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  • Iranian Intensive Care Unit Nurses' Moral Distress: A Content Analysis.F. A. Shorideh, T. Ashktorab & F. Yaghmaei - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (4):464-478.
    Researchers have identified the phenomena of moral distress through many studies in Western countries. This research reports the first study of moral distress in Iran. Because of the differences in cultural values and nursing education, nurses working in intensive care units may experience moral distress differently than reported in previous studies. This research used a qualitative method involving semistructured and in-depth interviews of a purposive sample of 31 (28 clinical nurses and 3 nurse educators) individuals to identify the types of (...)
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  • Preventing Moral Conflicts in Patient Care: Insights From a Mixed-Methods Study with Clinical Experts.Jan Schürmann, Gabriele Vaitaityte & Stella Reiter-Theil - forthcoming - Clinical Ethics.
    Background and aim Healthcare professionals are regularly exposed to moral challenges in patient care potentially compromising quality of care and safety of patients. Preventive clinical ethics support aims to identify and address moral problems in patient care at an early stage of their development. This study investigates the occurrence, risk factors, early indicators, decision parameters, consequences and preventive measures of moral problems. Method Semi-structured expert interviews were conducted with 20 interprofessional healthcare professionals from 2 university hospitals in Basel, Switzerland. A (...)
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  • Identification of Risk Factors for Moral Distress in Nurses: Basis for the Development of a New Assessment Tool.Rafaela Schaefer, Elma Lourdes Campos Pavone Zoboli & Margarida Vieira - 2016 - Nursing Inquiry 23 (4):346-357.
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  • Moral Distress in Undergraduate Nursing Students.Loredana Sasso, Annamaria Bagnasco, Monica Bianchi, Valentina Bressan & Franco Carnevale - 2016 - Nursing Ethics 23 (5):523-534.
    Background:Nurses and nursing students appear vulnerable to moral distress when faced with ethical dilemmas or decision-making in clinical practice. As a result, they may experience professional dissatisfaction and their relationships with patients, families, and colleagues may be compromised. The impact of moral distress may manifest as anger, feelings of guilt and frustration, a desire to give up the profession, loss of self-esteem, depression, and anxiety.Objectives:The purpose of this review was to describe how dilemmas and environmental, relational, and organizational factors contribute (...)
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  • To Change or Not to Change - Translating and Culturally Adapting the Paediatric Version of the Moral Distress Scale-Revised.Margareta af Sandeberg, Marika Wenemark, Cecilia Bartholdson, Kim Lützén & Pernilla Pergert - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):14.
    Paediatric cancer care poses ethically difficult situations that can lead to value conflicts about what is best for the child, possibly resulting in moral distress. Research on moral distress is lacking in paediatric cancer care in Sweden and most questionnaires are developed in English. The Moral Distress Scale-Revised is a questionnaire that measures moral distress in specific situations; respondents are asked to indicate both the frequency and the level of disturbance when the situation arises. The aims of this study were (...)
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  • Clinical Ethics Support for Healthcare Personnel: An Integrative Literature Review.Dara Rasoal, Kirsti Skovdahl, Mervyn Gifford & Annica Kihlgren - 2017 - HEC Forum 29 (4):313-346.
    This study describes which clinical ethics approaches are available to support healthcare personnel in clinical practice in terms of their construction, functions and goals. Healthcare personnel frequently face ethically difficult situations in the course of their work and these issues cover a wide range of areas from prenatal care to end-of-life care. Although various forms of clinical ethics support have been developed, to our knowledge there is a lack of review studies describing which ethics support approaches are available, how they (...)
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  • Ethical Conflict Among Nurses Working in the Intensive Care Units.Amir-Hossein Pishgooie, Maasoumeh Barkhordari-Sharifabad, Foroozan Atashzadeh-Shoorideh & Anna Falcó-Pegueroles - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):2225-2238.
    Background:Ethical conflict is a barrier to decision-making process and is a problem derived from ethical responsibilities that nurses assume with care. Intensive care unit nurses are potentially exposed to this phenomenon. A deep study of the phenomenon can help prevent and treat it.Objectives:This study was aimed at determining the frequency, degree, level of exposure, and type of ethical conflict among nurses working in the intensive care units.Research design:This was a descriptive cross-sectional research.Participants and research context:In total, 382 nurses working in (...)
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  • Translating and Culturally Adapting the Shortened Version of the Hospital Ethical Climate Survey – Retaining or Modifying Validated Instruments.Pernilla Pergert, Cecilia Bartholdson, Marika Wenemark, Kim Lützén & Margareta af Sandeberg - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):35.
    The Hospital Ethical Climate Survey was developed in the USA and later shortened. HECS has previously been translated into Swedish and the aim of this study was to describe a process of translating and culturally adapting HECS-S and to develop a Swedish multi-professional version, relevant for paediatrics. Another aim was to describe decisions about retaining versus modifying the questionnaire in order to keep the Swedish version as close as possible to the original while achieving a good functional level and trustworthiness. (...)
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  • Moral Distress in Paediatric Oncology: Contributing Factors and Group Differences.Pernilla Pergert, Cecilia Bartholdson, Klas Blomgren & Margareta af Sandeberg - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301880980.
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  • Framing the Issues: Moral Distress in Health Care. [REVIEW]Bernadette M. Pauly, Colleen Varcoe & Jan Storch - 2012 - HEC Forum 24 (1):1-11.
    Moral distress in health care has been identified as a growing concern and a focus of research in nursing and health care for almost three decades. Researchers and theorists have argued that moral distress has both short and long-term consequences. Moral distress has implications for satisfaction, recruitment and retention of health care providers and implications for the delivery of safe and competent quality patient care. In over a decade of research on ethical practice, registered nurses and other health care practitioners (...)
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  • Moral Distress Experienced by Psychiatric Nurses in Japan.Kayoko Ohnishi, Yasuko Ohgushi, Masataka Nakano, Hirohide Fujii, Hiromi Tanaka, Kazuyo Kitaoka, Jun Nakahara & Yugo Narita - 2010 - Nursing Ethics 17 (6):726-740.
    This study aimed to: (1) develop and evaluate the Moral Distress Scale for Psychiatric nurses (MDS-P); (2) use the MDS-P to examine the moral distress experienced by Japanese psychiatric nurses; and (3) explore the correlation between moral distress and burnout. A questionnaire on the intensity and frequency of moral distress items (the MDS-P: 15 items grouped into three factors), a burnout scale (Maslach Burnout Inventory — General Survey) and demographic questions were administered to 391 Japanese psychiatric nurses in 2007—2008. These (...)
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  • Moral Distress Experienced by Nurses: A Quantitative Literature Review.Younjae Oh & Chris Gastmans - 2015 - Nursing Ethics 22 (1):15-31.
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  • Gender and the Experience of Moral Distress in Critical Care Nurses.Christopher B. O’Connell - 2015 - Nursing Ethics 22 (1):32-42.
  • Ethical Climate and Nurse Competence – Newly Graduated Nurses' Perceptions.O. Numminen, H. Leino-Kilpi, H. Isoaho & R. Meretoja - 2015 - Nursing Ethics 22 (8):845-859.
  • Ethical Climates in Organizations: A Review and Research Agenda.Alexander Newman, Heather Round, Sukanto Bhattacharya & Achinto Roy - 2017 - Business Ethics Quarterly 27 (4):475-512.
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  • Moving From Conceptual Ambiguity to Knowledgeable Action: Using a Critical Realist Approach to Studying Moral Distress.Lynn C. Musto & Patricia A. Rodney - 2016 - Nursing Philosophy 17 (2):75-87.
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  • Main Challenges in Adoption of Consultation Services of Hospital Ethics Committees: A Systematic Review of the Literature.Mir Sajjad Seyyed Mousavi, Rahim Khodayari-Zarnaq & Alireza Hajizadeh - 2022 - Clinical Ethics 17 (1):41-50.
    Background There are numerous challenges in the consultation services of the Hospital Ethics Committees that can impact the means of providing healthcare. This review aimed to identify the main challenges in the application of consultation services of the HEC and propose possible solutions. Methods This systematic review was conducted through searching electronic databases including PubMed, Scopus, Science Direct, ProQuest, and Embase. Inclusion criteria included studies published in English language in a peer-reviewed journal, from 2000 to 2019 were identified, which clearly (...)
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  • What is ‘Moral Distress’? A Narrative Synthesis of the Literature.Georgina Morley, Jonathan Ives, Caroline Bradbury-Jones & Fiona Irvine - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301772435.
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  • Moral Distress and Austerity: An Avoidable Ethical Challenge in Healthcare.Georgina Morley, Jonathan Ives & Caroline Bradbury-Jones - 2019 - Health Care Analysis 27 (3):185-201.
    Austerity, by its very nature, imposes constraints by limiting the options for action available to us because certain courses of action are too costly or insufficiently cost effective. In the context of healthcare, the constraints imposed by austerity come in various forms; ranging from the availability of certain treatments being reduced or withdrawn completely, to reductions in staffing that mean healthcare professionals must ration the time they make available to each patient. As austerity has taken hold, across the United Kingdom (...)
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  • Moral Distress in the Resuscitation of Extremely Premature Infants.Jennifer Molloy, Marilyn Evans & Kevin Coughlin - 2015 - Nursing Ethics 22 (1):52-63.
  • Professional Quality of Life of Japanese Nurses/Midwives Providing Abortion/Childbirth Care.Maki Mizuno, Emiko Kinefuchi, Rumiko Kimura & Akiko Tsuda - 2013 - Nursing Ethics 20 (5):539-550.
    This study explored the relationship between professional quality of life and emotion work and the major stress factors related to abortion care in Japanese obstetric and gynecological nurses and midwives. Between October 2011 and January 2012, questionnaires that included questions concerning eight stress factors, the Professional Quality of Life Scale, and the Japanese version of the Frankfurt Emotional Work Scale, were answered by 255 nurses and midwives working in abortion and childbirth services. Professional Quality of Life scores were significantly associated (...)
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  • Searching for Ethical Leadership in Nursing.Kara Schick Makaroff, Janet Storch, Bernie Pauly & Lorelei Newton - 2014 - Nursing Ethics 21 (6):642-658.
    Background:Attention to ethical leadership in nursing has diminished over the past several decades.Objectives:The aim of our study was to investigate how frontline nurses and formal nurse leaders envision ethical nursing leadership.Research design:Meta-ethnography was used to guide our analysis and synthesis of four studies that explored the notion of ethical nursing leadership.Participants and research context:These four original studies were conducted from 1999-2008 in Canada with 601 participants.Ethical considerations:Ethical approval from the original studies covered future analysis.Findings:Using the analytic strategy of lines-of-argument, we (...)
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  • Dare We Speak of Ethics? Attending to the Unsayable Amongst Nurse Leaders.Kara Schick Makaroff, Janet Storch, Lorelei Newton, Tom Fulton & Lynne Stevenson - 2010 - Nursing Ethics 17 (5):566-576.
    There is increasing emphasis on the need for collaboration between practice and academic leaders in health care research. However, many problems can arise owing to differences between academic and clinical goals and timelines. In order for research to move forward it is important to name and address these issues early in a project. In this article we use an example of a participatory action research study of ethical practice in nursing to highlight some of the issues that are not frequently (...)
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  • Blood Sampling From Dying Patients: An Ethical Dilemma.Morten Magelssen, Pamela Åsten, Ellen Godal, Eirik Os, Anders Smith, Hanne Rusten Solås & Marit Helene Hem - 2012 - Clinical Ethics 7 (3):107-110.
  • Ethical Conflicts and Their Characteristics Among Critical Care Nurses.Teresa Lluch-Canut, Carlos Sequeira, Anna Falcó-Pegueroles, José António Pinho, Albina Rodrigues-Ferreira, Joan Guàrdia Olmos & Juan Roldan-Merino - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301985778.
    Introduction: Ethical conflict is a phenomenon that has been under study over the last three decades, especially the types moral dilemma and moral distress in the field of nursing care. However, ethical problems and their idiosyncrasies need to be further explored. Aim: The objectives of this study were, first, to obtain a transcultural Portuguese-language adaptation and validation of the Ethical Conflict Nursing Questionnaire–Critical Care Version and, second, to analyse Portuguese critical care nurses’ level of exposure to ethical conflict and its (...)
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  • Ethical Dilemmas Faced by Frontline Support Nurses Fighting COVID-19.Xinyi Liu, Yingying Xu, Yuanyuan Chen, Chen Chen, Qiwei Wu, Huiwen Xu, Pingting Zhu & Ericka Waidley - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):7-18.
    Background: In 2019, an outbreak of COVID-19 broke out in Hubei, China. Medical workers from all over the country rushed to Hubei and participated in the treatment and care of COVID-19 patients. These nurses, dedicated to their professional practice, volunteered to provide compassion and expert clinical care during the pandemic. As with other acts of heroism, the ethical dilemmas associated with working on the front line must be considered for future practice. Purpose: To explore the ethical dilemmas of frontline nurses (...)
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  • Nurses’ Perception of Ethical Climate at a Large Academic Medical Center.Donna Lemmenes, Pamela Valentine, Patricia Gwizdalski, Catherine Vincent & Chuanhong Liao - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301666498.
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  • Ethikkompetenzerwerb im Handlungsfeld – Voraussetzungen und Impulse für die professionelle Pflegepraxis.Sonja Lehmeyer & Annette Riedel - 2019 - Ethik in der Medizin 31 (4):391-406.
    Die Anforderungen an das ethisch-professionelle Handeln Pflegender und somit auch die Forderungen an die professionelle Ethikkompetenz Pflegender im praktischen Berufsfeld wandeln sich sowohl qualitativ als auch quantitativ. Dies wird auch in den veränderten normativen Rahmungen der Pflegebildung deutlich. Der Lernort Praxis als ein zentraler Ort pflegebezogener Bildungsprozesse rückt somit nochmals stärker in den Fokus der Ethikkompetenzentwicklung professionell Pflegender. Der Beitrag konturiert zentrale Anforderungen und veränderte Bezüglichkeiten für die Ethikbildung im beruflichen Handlungsfeld professioneller Pflege und formuliert davon ausgehend zentrale Prämissen an (...)
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  • Acquisition of ethical competence in practice—requirements and impulses for professional nursing practice.Sonja Lehmeyer & Annette Riedel - 2019 - Ethik in der Medizin 31 (4):391-406.
    ZusammenfassungDie Anforderungen an das ethisch-professionelle Handeln Pflegender und somit auch die Forderungen an die professionelle Ethikkompetenz Pflegender im praktischen Berufsfeld wandeln sich sowohl qualitativ als auch quantitativ. Dies wird auch in den veränderten normativen Rahmungen der Pflegebildung deutlich. Der Lernort Praxis als ein zentraler Ort pflegebezogener Bildungsprozesse rückt somit nochmals stärker in den Fokus der Ethikkompetenzentwicklung professionell Pflegender. Der Beitrag konturiert zentrale Anforderungen und veränderte Bezüglichkeiten für die Ethikbildung im beruflichen Handlungsfeld professioneller Pflege und formuliert davon ausgehend zentrale Prämissen an (...)
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  • Ethical Climate in Nursing Environment: A Scoping Review.Janika Koskenvuori, Olivia Numminen & Riitta Suhonen - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):327-345.
    Background:In the past two decades, interest in the concept of ethical climate and in its research has increased in healthcare. Ethical climate is viewed as a type of organizational work climate, and defined as the shared perception of ethically correct behavior, and how ethical issues should be handled in the organization. Ethical climate as an important element of nursing environment has been the focus of several studies. However, scoping reviews of ethical climate research in nursing have not been conducted to (...)
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  • Moral Distress in Turkish Intensive Care Nurses.Serife Karagozoglu, Gulay Yildirim, Dilek Ozden & Ziynet Çınar - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (2):209-224.
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  • Impact of Ethical Factors on Job Satisfaction Among Korean Nurses.Yujin Jang & Younjae Oh - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):1186-1198.
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  • Coping with Moral Distress on Acute Psychiatric Wards: A Qualitative Study.Trine-Lise Jansen, Marit Helene Hem, Lars Johan Danbolt & Ingrid Hanssen - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):171-180.
    Background: Nurses working within acute psychiatric settings often face multifaceted moral dilemmas and incompatible demands. Methods: Qualitative individual and focus group interviews were conducted. Ethical considerations: Approval was received from the Norwegian Social Science Data Services. Ethical Research Guidelines were followed. Participants and research context: Thirty nurses working within acute psychiatric wards in two mental health hospitals. Results: Various coping strategies were used: mentally sorting through their ethical dilemmas or bringing them to the leadership, not ‘bringing problems home’ after work (...)
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  • Ethical Challenges.Rita Jakobsen & Venke Sørlie - 2016 - Nursing Ethics 23 (6):636-645.
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  • Nurses' Perception of Ethical Climate, Medical Error Experience and Intent-to-Leave.J. -I. Hwang & H. -A. Park - 2014 - Nursing Ethics 21 (1):28-42.
  • A Study of Nurses’ Ethical Climate Perceptions.Anne Humphries & Martin Woods - 2016 - Nursing Ethics 23 (3):265-276.
    Background: Acting ethically, in accordance with professional and personal moral values, lies at the heart of nursing practice. However, contextual factors, or obstacles within the work environment, can constrain nurses in their ethical practice – hence the importance of the workplace ethical climate. Interest in nurse workplace ethical climates has snowballed in recent years because the ethical climate has emerged as a key variable in the experience of nurse moral distress. Significantly, this study appears to be the first of its (...)
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