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  1. Integrating and Enacting 'Social and Ethical Issues' in Nanotechnology Practices.Ana Viseu & Heather Maguire - 2012 - NanoEthics 6 (3):195-209.
    The integration of nanotechnology’s ‘social and ethical issues’ (SEI) at the research and development stage is one of the defining features of nanotechnology governance in the United States. Mandated by law, integration extends the field of nanotechnology to include a role for the “social”, the “public” and the social sciences and humanities in research and development (R&D) practices and agendas. Drawing from interviews with scientists, engineers and policymakers who took part in an oral history of the “Future of Nanotechnology” symposium (...)
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  • Development and Pilot Testing of an Evidence-Based Training Module for Integrating Social and Ethical Implications into the Lab.Lee Ann Kahlor, Xiaoshan Li & Jacy Jones - 2019 - NanoEthics 13 (1):37-52.
    In this project, we explore perceptions of the social and ethical implications of nanotechnology among US scientists who work at the nanoscale, and develop and pilot test an online training module to foster consideration of social and ethical implications in the lab. To meet our first goal, we drew qualitative insights from open-ended survey data collected from scientists affiliated with the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network. Our data suggest that while the survey participants responded positively to the idea that consideration of (...)
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  • The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development.Steven M. Flipse, Maarten C. A. Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate motivations for NEST (...)
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  • The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development.Steven M. Flipse, Maarten Ca van der Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate motivations for NEST (...)
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  • Setting Up Spaces for Collaboration in Industry Between Researchers from the Natural and Social Sciences.Steven M. Flipse, Maarten C. A. van der Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer - 2014 - Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (1):7-22.
    Policy makers call upon researchers from the natural and social sciences to collaborate for the responsible development and deployment of innovations. Collaborations are projected to enhance both the technical quality of innovations, and the extent to which relevant social and ethical considerations are integrated into their development. This could make these innovations more socially robust and responsible, particularly in new and emerging scientific and technological fields, such as synthetic biology and nanotechnology. Some researchers from both fields have embarked on collaborative (...)
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  • Midstream Modulation in Biotechnology Industry: Redefining What is 'Part of the Job' of Researchers in Industry. [REVIEW]Steven M. Flipse, Maarten C. A. Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1141-1164.
    In response to an increasing amount of policy papers stressing the need for integrating social and ethical aspects in Research and Development (R&D) practices, science studies scholars have conducted integrative research and experiments with science and innovation actors. One widely employed integration method is Midstream Modulation (MM), in which an ‘embedded humanist’ interacts in regular meetings with researchers to engage them with the social and ethical aspects of their work. While the possibility of using MM to enhance critical reflection has (...)
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  • Midstream Modulation in Biotechnology Industry: Redefining What is 'Part of the Job' of Researchers in Industry. [REVIEW]Steven M. Flipse, Maarten Ca van der Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1141-1164.
    In response to an increasing amount of policy papers stressing the need for integrating social and ethical aspects in Research and Development (R&D) practices, science studies scholars have conducted integrative research and experiments with science and innovation actors. One widely employed integration method is Midstream Modulation (MM), in which an ‘embedded humanist’ interacts in regular meetings with researchers to engage them with the social and ethical aspects of their work. While the possibility of using MM to enhance critical reflection has (...)
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  • Wide Reflective Equilibrium as a Normative Model for Responsible Governance.Neelke Doorn - 2013 - NanoEthics 7 (1):29-43.
    Soft regulatory measures are often promoted as an alternative for existing regulatory regimes for nanotechnologies. The call for new regulatory approaches stems from several challenges that traditional approaches have difficulties dealing with. These challenges relate to general problems of governability, tensions between public interests, but also (and maybe particularly) to almost complete lack of certainty about the implications of nanotechnologies. At the same time, the field of nanotechnology can be characterized by a high level of diversity. In this paper, we (...)
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