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  1. “They Are Not Different From Others”: Ethical Practices and Corruption in Bangladeshi Journalism.Manzur Elahi - 2013 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 28 (3):189-202.
    This study attempts to find out Bangladeshi journalists' attitudes, perceptions, and practices about ethical dilemmas, particularly those involving conflicts of interest. Based on a survey of 333 Dhaka-based journalists, in-depth interviews, and focus group discussions, the study found that journalists' ethical standards are poor and that many indulge in corrupt practices. Their acceptance of corruption may be related to the country's general culture of corruption and ignorance of ethical issues. Professional behavior may be improved by introducing codes of ethics and (...)
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  • Codes and Culture at the Courier-Journal: Complexity in Ethical Decision Making.David E. Boeyink - 1998 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 13 (3):165 – 182.
    This study examines the way ethical decisions are made in controversial cases at The Courier-Journal in Louisville, Kentucky, to see if codes of ethics can be efective at a newspaper known for its commitment to ethics. The study concludes that a code is efective in that environment especially on conflict-of-interest questions. A critical factor in the code's efectiveness is an ethical culture in which editors support ethical standards vigorously and foster a process that encourages newsroom debate over controversial cases.
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  • AIDS Testing, Potter, and TV News Decisions.Russell B. Williams - 1997 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 12 (3):148 – 159.
    Seventeen television journalistsfrom Indianapolis and Terre Haute, Indiana encountered a computer simulation of newsgathering, based on Potter's Box. The situation involved showing identijable faces in a story about AIDS testing. Additional information was the most accessed resource. Organizational codes of ethics were accessed the least. Journalism organization members sought more advice from all resources than others. More experienced respondents accessed more advicefrom professional peers. Females were less interested in peer advice than their male counterparts.
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  • Eye on Soweto: A Study of Factors in News Photo Use.Sue O'Brien - 1993 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 8 (2):69 – 87.
    The 1991 Pulitzer for spot news photography went to freelancer Gregory Marinovich, who documented the murder of an accused Zulu spy by African National Congress sympathizers in Soweto, South Africa. Marinovich tried, and failed, to stop the violence. Of 57 Associated Press newspapers surveyed, 24 ran either a photo of the victim being burned alive or an equally disturbing stabbing. This analysis reports that most editors who played the photos aggressively were also careful to place them in a substantive news (...)
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  • Images in Ethics Codes in an Era of Violence and Tragedy.Susan Keith, Carol B. Schwalbe & B. William Silcock - 2006 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 21 (4):245 – 264.
    In an analysis of 47 U.S. journalism ethics codes, we found that although most consider images, only 9 address a gripping issue: how to treat images of tragedy and violence, such as those produced on the battlefields of Iraq, during the 2005 London bombings, and after Hurricane Katrina. Among codes that consider violent and tragic images, there is agreement on what images are problematic and a move toward green-light considerations of ethical responsibilities. However, the special problems of violence and truth (...)
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