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  1. Fragility, Uncertainty, and Healthcare.Wendy A. Rogers & Mary J. Walker - 2016 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (1):71-83.
    Medicine seeks to overcome one of the most fundamental fragilities of being human, the fragility of good health. No matter how robust our current state of health, we are inevitably susceptible to future illness and disease, while current disease serves to remind us of various frailties inherent in the human condition. This article examines the relationship between fragility and uncertainty with regard to health, and argues that there are reasons to accept rather than deny at least some forms of uncertainty. (...)
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  • Mandatory Disclosure and Medical Paternalism.Emma Bullock - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (2):409-424.
    Medical practitioners are duty-bound to tell their patients the truth about their medical conditions, along with the risks and benefits of proposed treatments. Some patients, however, would rather not receive medical information. A recent response to this tension has been to argue that that the disclosure of medical information is not optional. As such, patients do not have permission to refuse medical information. In this paper I argue that, depending on the context, the disclosure of medical information can undermine the (...)
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  • Becoming In-Formed: Genetic Counselling, Ambiguity and Choice. [REVIEW]Joanna Latimer - 2007 - Health Care Analysis 15 (1):13-23.
    The paper presents findings from an ethnography of dysmorphology, a specialism in genetic medicine, to explore genetic counselling as a process through which parents ‘become informed.’ Current professional and policy debate over the use of genetic technology in medicine emphasises the need for informed choice making, and for genetic services that provide parents with what is referred to as ‘non-directive genetic counselling.’ In the paper the process of becoming informed is shown to be very specific and to have its own (...)
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  • Conditions for Patient Participation and Non-Participation in Health Care.Ann Catrine Eldh, Inger Ekman & Margareta Ehnfors - 2006 - Nursing Ethics 13 (5):503-514.
    This study explored patients' experiences of participation and non-participation in their health care. A questionnaire-based survey method was used. Content analysis showed that conditions for patient participation occurred when information was provided not by using standard procedures but based on individual needs and accompanied by explanations, when the patient was regarded as an individual, when the patient's knowledge was recognized by staff, and when the patient made decisions based on knowledge and needs, or performed self-care. Thus, to provide conditions for (...)
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  • Oncologists' Communication About Uncertain Information in Second Opinion Consultations: A Focused Qualitative Analysis.Jamie L. van Someren, Vicky Lehmann, Jacqueline M. Stouthard, Anne M. Stiggelbout, Ellen M. A. Smets & Marij A. Hillen - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Introduction: Uncertainty is omnipresent in cancer care, including the ambiguity of diagnostic tests, efficacy and side effects of treatments, and/or patients' long-term prognosis. During second opinion consultations, uncertainty may be particularly tangible: doubts and uncertainty may drive patients to seek more information and request a second opinion, whereas the second opinion in turn may also affect patients' level of uncertainty. Providers are tasked to clearly discuss all of these uncertainties with patients who may feel overwhelmed by it. The aim of (...)
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  • Care Ethics for Guiding the Process of Multiple Sclerosis Diagnosis.Timothy Mark Krahn - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (12):802-806.
  • Uncertainty, Responsibility, and the Evolution of the Physician/Patient Relationship.M. S. Henry - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (6):321-323.
    The practice of evidence based medicine has changed the role of the physician from information dispenser to gatherer and analyser. Studies and controlled trials that may contain unknown errors, or uncertainties, are the primary sources for evidence based decisions in medicine. These sources may be corrupted by a number of means, such as inaccurate statistical analysis, statistical manipulation, population bias, or relevance to the patient in question. Regardless of whether any of these inaccuracies are apparent, the uncertainty of their presence (...)
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  • Balancing Legitimate Critical-Care Interests: Setting Defensible Care Limits Through Policy Development.Jeffrey Kirby - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (1):38-47.
    Critical-care decision making is highly complex, given the need for health care providers and organizations to consider, and constructively respond to, the diverse interests and perspectives of a variety of legitimate stakeholders. Insights derived from an identified set of ethics-related considerations have the potential to meaningfully inform inclusive and deliberative policy development that aims to optimally balance the competing obligations that arise in this challenging, clinical decision-making domain. A potential, constructive outcome of such policy engagement is the collaborative development of (...)
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  • Prognosis Terminal: Truth-Telling in the Context of End-of-Life Care.Ben A. Rich - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (2):209-219.
    Recent contributions to the medical literature have raised yet again the issue of whether the term “terminal” is an intelligible one and whether there is a consensus view of its meaning that is sufficient to justify or even require its use in discussing end-of-life care and treatment options with patients. Following a review of the history and development of informed consent, persistent problems with the communication of prognosis and the breaking of bad news are analyzed. The author argues that candid (...)
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