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Zeno of elea

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (2008)

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  1. Moving, Moved and Will Be Moving: Zeno and Nāgārjuna on Motion From Mahāmudrā, Koan and Mathematical Physics Perspectives.Robert Alan Paul - 2017 - Comparative Philosophy 8 (2):65-89.
    Zeno’s Arrow and Nāgārjuna’s Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way Chapter 2 contain paradoxical, dialectic arguments thought to indicate that there is no valid explanation of motion, hence there is no physical or generic motion. There are, however, diverse interpretations of the latter text, and I argue they apply to Zeno’s Arrow as well. I also find that many of the interpretations are dependent on a mathematical analysis of material motion through space and time. However, with modern philosophy and physics (...)
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  • Paradoxical Nature of Language in Terms of its Acquisition and Learning.Pavlo Sodomora & Oleh Yerchenko - 2021 - Filosofiâ I Kosmologiâ 26:123-131.
    The process of learning is analogous to the process of motion, as well as it resembles the progress from less to more perfect. Plato, combining two opposites, attempts at reconciliation of the theories of Heraclitus and Parmenides, providing us with his amazing theory of Forms. In light of this, he speaks of language as a means of cognizance of the Universe. In his own turn, and much later, Ludwig Wittgenstein, combining incompatible, speaks of language as the single subject which requires (...)
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  • Are Zeno’s Arguments Unsound Paradoxes?Guido Calenda - 2013 - Peitho 4 (1):125-140.
    Zeno’s arguments are generally regarded as ingenious but downright unsound paradoxes, worth of attention mainly to disclose why they go wrong or, alternatively, to recognise them as clever, even if crude, anticipations of modern views on the space, the infinite or the quantum view of matter. In either case, the arguments lose any connection with the scientific and philosophical problems of Zeno’s own time and environment. In the present paper, I argue that it is possible to make sense of Zeno’s (...)
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  • Stoic Caricature in Lucian’s De Astrologia: Verisimilitude As Comedy.Charles McNamara - 2013 - Peitho 4 (1):235-253.
    The inclusion of De astrologia in the Lucianic corpus has been disputed for centuries since it appears to defend astrological practices that Lucian elsewhere undercuts. This paper argues for Lucian’s authorship by illustrating its masterful subversion of a captatio benevolentiae and subtle rejection of Stoic astrological practices. The narrator begins the text by blaming phony astrologers and their erroneous predictions for inciting others to “denounce the stars and hate astrology” (ἄστρων τε κατηγοροῦσιν καὶ αὐτὴν ἀστρολογίην μισέουσιν, 2). The narrator assures (...)
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  • Les Arguments de Zénon D’Après le Parménide de Platon.Mathieu Marion - 2014 - Dialogue 53 (3):393-434.
    Après avoir présenté les règles de l’antilogique éléatique, je soutiens que Zénon pratiquait celle-ci et, à partir de l’étude de passages duParménidede Platon, que ses paradoxes sur la divisibilité et le mouvement ne sont pas des réfutations par l’absurde, mais plutôt de simples dérivations d’impossibilités employées pour ridiculiser les adversaires de Parménide. Zénon ne cherchait donc pas à prouver l’inexistence du mouvement, mais simplement à l’inférer des prémisses de ses adversaires. Je montre en outre que ces paradoxes sont conçus, conformément (...)
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