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  1. Let Slip the Dogs of Commerce: The Ethics of Voluntary Corporate Withdrawal in Response to War.Tadhg Ó Laoghaire - 2024 - The Journal of Ethics 28 (1):27-52.
    Over 1000 companies have either curtailed or else completely ceased operations in Russia as a response to its invasion of Ukraine, a mass corporate exodus of a speed and scale which we’ve never seen. While corporate withdrawal appears to have considerable public support, it’s not obvious that it has done anything to hamper the Russian war effort, nor is it clear what the long-run effects of corporate withdrawal as a regularised response to war might be. Given this, it’s important the (...)
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  • Twitter-Based Social Accountability Callouts.Dean Neu & Gregory D. Saxton - 2024 - Journal of Business Ethics 189 (4):797-815.
    The ICIJ’s release of the _Panama Papers_ in 2016 opened up a wealth of previously private financial information on the tax avoidance, tax evasion, and wealth concealment activities of politicians, government officials, and their allies. Drawing upon prior accountability and ethics focused research, we utilize a dataset of almost 28 M tweets sent between 2016 and early 2020 to consider the microdetails and overall trajectory of this particular social accountability conversation. The study shows how the publication of previously private financial (...)
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  • Accounting for Failure Through Morality: The IMF’s Involvement in (Mis)managing the Greek Crisis.Stephanos Avakian & Marianna Fotaki - 2024 - Journal of Business Ethics 189 (4):817-841.
    In examining how reform-leading supranational institutions respond to public criticism, this article advances current theory on their institutional accountability mechanisms and extends research on this topic by focusing on their responses to public criticism of alleged reform failures. We consider the case of the International Monetary Fund’s (IMF’s) involvement in the Greek economic crisis, as the structural adjustment reforms it imposed to stabilize the economy. We show how these controversial and, by many accounts, failed policies have profoundly impacted the well-being (...)
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  • Moral Degradation, Business Ethics, and Corporate Social Responsibility in a Transitional Economy.Qinqin Zheng, Yadong Luo & Stephanie Lu Wang - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 120 (3):405-421.
    This article theoretically proposes and empirically verifies an understudied issue in the business ethics and corporate social responsibility literature—how moral degradation in a society influences the relationship between BE or CSR and firm performance. Building on strategic choice theory, we propose that both BE and CSR become more important in enhancing business success when the perceived MD is heightened. Our analysis of 300 firms operating in China statistically confirms our hypotheses: first, under high MD, firms’ engagement in CSR results in (...)
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  • Individuals’ Perceptions of the Legitimacy of Emerging Market Multinationals: Ethical Foundations and Construct Validation.Jianhong Zhang, David L. Deephouse, Désirée van Gorp & Haico Ebbers - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (4):801-825.
    Entry of new organizations, including multinational enterprises from emerging markets, raises the ethical question of will they benefit society. The concept of legitimacy answers this question because it is the overall assessment of the appropriateness of organizational ends and means. Moreover, gaining legitimacy enables EMNEs to succeed in new host countries. Past work examined collective level indicators of the legitimacy of MNEs, but recent research recognizes the importance of individuals’ perceptions as the micro-foundation of legitimacy. This study first uses new (...)
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  • Board Composition and Corporate Social Responsibility: An Empirical Investigation in the Post Sarbanes-Oxley Era. [REVIEW]Jason Q. Zhang, Hong Zhu & Hung-bin Ding - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (3):381-392.
    Although the composition of the board of directors has important implications for different aspects of firm performance, prior studies tend to focus on financial performance. The effects of board composition on corporate social responsibility (CSR) performance remain an under-researched area, particularly in the period following the enactment of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX). This article specifically examines two important aspects of board composition (i.e., the presence of outside directors and the presence of women directors) and their relationship with CSR (...)
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  • Dehybridization in the Face of the Party-State: A Longitudinal Case Study of a Chinese SOE's Corporate Governance Responses to Institutional Change.Jun Jie Yang, Lai Si Tsui-Auch & Xueli Wang - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 182 (3):1-18.
    This longitudinal case study identifies corporate governance responses in a Chinese state-owned enterprise facing institutional logic multiplicity and demands to shoulder sociopolitical responsibilities beyond economic responsibility. We find that overseas listing led to the incorporation of market logic into an enterprise in which party-state logic prevailed. The prioritization of sociopolitical responsibilities vis-à-vis economic responsibility has shifted through three phases, reflecting changes in institutional logic centrality amid changing politico-institutional and firm conditions. In response, the enterprise developed hybrid corporate governance structures based (...)
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  • Foundations of Responsible Leadership: Asian Versus Western Executive Responsibility Orientations Toward Key Stakeholders.Michael A. Witt & Günter K. Stahl - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (3):623-638.
    Exploring the construct of social-responsibility orientation across three Asian and two Western societies, we show evidence that top-level executives in these societies hold fundamentally different beliefs about their responsibilities toward different stakeholders, with concomitant implications for their understanding and enactment of responsible leadership. We further find that these variations are more closely aligned with institutional factors than with cultural variables, suggesting a need to clarify the connection between culture and institutions on the one hand and culture and social-responsibility orientations on (...)
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  • Managing Organizational Gender Diversity Images: A Content Analysis of German Corporate Websites.Leon Windscheid, Lynn Bowes-Sperry, Karsten Jonsen & Michèle Morner - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (4):997-1013.
    Although establishing gender equality in board and managerial positions has recently become more important for organizations, companies with low levels of gender diversity seem to perceive an ethical dilemma regarding the ways, in which they attempt to attain it. One way that organizations try to move toward gender equality is through the use of their corporate websites to manage potential applicants’ impressions of their current levels of, and actions to improve, gender diversity. The dilemma is whether to truthfully communicate their (...)
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  • The United Nations Global Compact: What Did It Promise?Oliver F. Williams - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 122 (2):241-251.
    Sethi and Schepers have identified an important issue for the global economy: Providing some mechanism for requiring assurance that environmental, social, and corporate governance information provided by a business is accurate and objective. Where they have gone wrong is in trying to change the mission of the United Nations Global Compact. From its inception, the UNGC has been clear that its mission is not to provide such assurance. This article first outlines the background for the historic announcement of the UNGC (...)
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  • Corporate Moral Legitimacy and the Legitimacy of Morals: A Critique of Palazzo/Scherer’s Communicative Framework. [REVIEW]Helmut Willke & Gerhard Willke - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):27 - 38.
    The article offers a critical assessment of an article on “Corporate Legitimacy as Deliberation” by Guido Palazzo and Andreas Scherer in this journal. We share the concern about the precarious legitimacy of globally active corporations, infringing on the legitimacy of democracy at large. There is no quarrel with Palazzo/Scherer’s diagnosis, which focuses on the consequences of globalization and ensuing challenges for corporate social responsibilities. However, we disagree with the “solutions” offered by them. In a first step we refute the idea (...)
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  • Corporate Moral Legitimacy and the Legitimacy of Morals: A Critique of Palazzo/Scherer’s Communicative Framework.Helmut Willke & Gerhard Willke - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):27-38.
    The article offers a critical assessment of an article on "Corporate Legitimacy as Deliberation" by Guido Palazzo and Andreas Scherer in this journal. We share the concern about the precarious legitimacy of globally active corporations, infringing on the legitimacy of democracy at large. There is no quarrel with Palazzo/Scherer's diagnosis, which focuses on the consequences of globalization and ensuing challenges for corporate social responsibilities. However, we disagree with the "solutions" offered by them. In a first step we refute the idea (...)
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  • “Business for Peace” (B4P): can this new global governance paradigm of the United Nations Global Compact bring some peace and stability to the Korean peninsula?Oliver F. Williams & Stephen Yong-Seung Park - 2019 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 8 (2):173-193.
    North Korea is under strict UN economic sanctions because it violated UN policy in its development of nuclear weapons and long range missiles as well as for its militant rhetoric. South Korea and Japan, as close allies of the USA, are unsure of the future. Is there a way to bring some peace and stability to the Korean peninsula? Some argue that this is a hopeless task as long as the current leadership of North Korea is in power. This article (...)
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  • The Political Perspective of Corporate Social Responsibility: A Critical Research Agenda.Glen Whelan - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (4):709-737.
    ABSTRACT:I here advance a critical research agenda for the political perspective of corporate social responsibility (Political CSR). I argue that whilst the ‘Political’ CSR literature is notable for both its conceptual novelty and practical importance, its development has been hamstrung by four ambiguities, conflations and/or oversights. More positively, I argue that ‘Political’ CSR should be conceived as one potentialformof globalization, and not as aconsequenceof ‘globalization’; that contemporary Western MNCs should be presumed to engage in CSR for instrumental reasons; that ‘Political’ (...)
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  • Assessing the Legitimacy of “Open” and “Closed” Data Partnerships for Sustainable Development.Erik Wetter, Mette Morsing & Andreas Rasche - 2021 - Business and Society 60 (3):547-581.
    This article examines the legitimacy attached to different types of multi-stakeholder data partnerships occurring in the context of sustainable development. We develop a framework to assess the democratic legitimacy of two types of data partnerships: open data partnerships and closed data partnerships. Our framework specifies criteria for assessing the legitimacy of relevant partnerships with regard to their input legitimacy as well as their output legitimacy. We demonstrate which particular characteristics of open and closed partnerships can be expected to influence an (...)
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  • The Escalation of Organizational Moral Failure in Public Discourse: A Semiotic Analysis of Nokia’s Bochum Plant Closure.Lauri Wessel, Riku Ruotsalainen, Henri A. Schildt & Christopher Wickert - 2023 - Journal of Business Ethics 184 (2):459-478.
    We examine the processes involved in the escalation of a plant closure from a local concern to a perceived organizational moral failure that commands national attention. Our empirical case covers the controversy over the decision of telecommunications giant Nokia to close a plant in Germany, despite having received significant state subsidies, and the relocation of production to Hungary and Romania. We conducted an inductive study that utilizes a semiotic analysis to identify how various actors framed the controversial plant closure and (...)
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  • Institutionalizing Peace through Commerce: Engagement or Divestment in South African and Sudan.Michelle Westermann-Behaylo - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (S4):417 - 434.
    Peace through Commerce literature has discussed how business can engage in more responsible behavior in order to mitigate conflict risk and promote conflict resolution. However, in many conflict situations, the question arises at what point does it become impossible for a firm to remain engaged on the ground and still function as an ethical business? This article discusses the role of divestment activist groups in changing institutional norms among MNCs operating in conflict situations. Institutional norms shift from firms conducting "business (...)
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  • Transnational Governance, Deliberative Democracy, and the Legitimacy of ISO 26000: Analyzing the Case of a Global Multistakeholder Process.Christian Weidtmann & Rüdiger Hahn - 2016 - Business and Society 55 (1):90-129.
    Globalization arguably generated a governance gap that is being filled by transnational rule-making involving private actors among others. The democratic legitimacy of such new forms of governance beyond nation states is sometimes questioned. Apart from nation-centered democracies, such governance cannot build, for example, on representation and voting procedures to convey legitimacy to the generated rules. Instead, alternative elements of democracy such as deliberation and inclusion require discussion to assess new instruments of governance. The recently published standard ISO 26000 is an (...)
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  • Uncommitted Deliberation? Discussing Regulatory Gaps by Comparing GRI 3.1 to GRI 4.0 in a Political CSR Perspective.Rea Wagner & Peter Seele - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (2):333-351.
    In this paper, we compare the two Global Reporting Initiative reporting standards, G3.1, and the most current version G4.0. We do this through the lens of political corporate social responsibility theory, which describes the broadened understanding of corporate responsibility in a globalized world building on Habermas’ notion of deliberative democracy and ethical discourse. As the regulatory power of nation states is fading, regulatory gaps occur as side effects of transnational business. As a result, corporations are also understood to play a (...)
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  • Accountability in a Global Economy.Sandra Waddock - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (1):23-44.
    This article assesses the proliferation of international accountability standards (IAS) in the recent past. We provide a comprehensive overview about the different types of standards and discuss their role as part of a new institutional infrastructure for corporate responsibility. Based on this, it is argued that IAS can advance corporate responsibility on a global level because they contribute to the closure of some omnipresent governance gaps. IAS also improve the preparedness of an organization to give an explanation and a justification (...)
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  • Responsible Leadership in Global Business: A New Approach to Leadership and Its Multi-Level Outcomes. [REVIEW]Christian Voegtlin, Moritz Patzer & Andreas Georg Scherer - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 105 (1):1-16.
    The article advances an understanding of responsible leadership in global business and offers an agenda for future research in this field. Our conceptualization of responsible leadership draws on deliberative practices and discursive conflict resolution, combining the macro-view of the business firm as a political actor with the micro-view of leadership. We discuss the concept in relation to existing research in leadership. Further, we propose a new model of responsible leadership that shows how such an understanding of leadership can address the (...)
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  • Development of a Scale Measuring Discursive Responsible Leadership.Christian Voegtlin - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (S1):57-73.
    The paper advances the conceptual understanding of responsible leadership and develops an empirical scale of discursive responsible leadership. The concept of responsible leadership presented here draws on deliberative practices and discursive conflict resolution, combining the macro-view of the business firm as a political actor with the micro-view of leadership. Ideal responsible leadership conduct thereby goes beyond the dyadic leader–follower interaction to include all stakeholders. The paper offers a definition and operationalization of responsible leadership. The studies that have been conducted to (...)
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  • How Do Firms Comply with International Sustainability Standards? Processes and Consequences of Adopting the Global Reporting Initiative.Laurence Vigneau, Michael Humphreys & Jeremy Moon - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 131 (2):469-486.
    This paper addresses the issue of the influence of global governance institutions, particularly international sustainability standards, on a firm’s intra-organizational practices. More precisely, we provide an exploratory empirical view of the impact of the Global Reporting Initiative on a multinational corporation’s corporate social responsibility management practices. We investigate standard compliance by comparing the stated intention of the use of the GRI with its actual use and the consequent effects within the firm. Based on an in-depth case study, our findings illustrate (...)
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  • Mediatized Humanitarianism: Trust and Legitimacy in the Age of Suspicion.Anne Vestergaard - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 120 (4):509-525.
    The article investigates the implications of mediatization for the legitimation strategies of humanitarian organizations. Based on a corpus of ~400 pages of brochure material from 1970 to 2007, the micro-textual processes involved in humanitarian organizations’ efforts to legitimate themselves and their moral claim were examined. A time trend analysis of the prioritization of actors in the material indicates that marked shifts in legitimation loci have taken place during the past 40 years. A discourse analysis unfolds the three dominant discourses behind (...)
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  • Legitimacy and Cosmopolitanism: Online Public Debates on (Corporate) Responsibility.Anne Vestergaard & Julie Uldam - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (2):227-240.
    Social media platforms have been vested with hope for their potential to enable ‘ordinary citizens’ to make their judgments public and contribute to pluralized discussions about organizations and their perceived legitimacy :60–97, 2018). This raises questions about how ordinary citizens make judgements and voice them in online spaces. This paper addresses these questions by examining how Western citizens ascribe responsibility and action in relation to corporate misconduct. Empirically, it focuses on modern slavery and analyses online debates in Denmark on child (...)
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  • The Role of Corporations in Shaping the Global Rules of the Game: In Search of New Foundations.J. van Oosterhout - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (2):253-264.
    ABSTRACT:Although a research focus on the increasing involvement of corporations in shaping and maintaining the global rules of the game points out promising avenues for future research, it simultaneously makes clear how little currently established, mostly managerial conceptual frameworks have to offer in making sense of these developments. It is argued that we need to expand the rather restricted perspectives that these frameworks provide, in order to explore new conceptual foundations that will not only enable us to travel the confines (...)
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  • Discursively Prioritizing Stakeholder Interests.Bastiaan van der Linden - 2012 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 31 (3-4):419-439.
    Contributions to stakeholder theory often do not systematically deal with the prioritization of stakeholder interests. An exception to this is Reed’s Habermasianapproach to stakeholder management. Central to Reed’s discursive approach is Habermas’s distinction between morality and ethics. Many authors in business ethics argue that, because of its distinction between morality and ethics, discourse ethics is well suited for dealing with the pluralism that characterizes modern society, but also mention complications with the application of this distinction. This paper taps into the (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosures, Traditionalism and Politics: A Story from a Traditional Setting.Shahzad Uddin, Javed Siddiqui & Muhammad Azizul Islam - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (2):409-428.
    This paper demonstrates the political perspective of corporate social responsibility disclosures and, drawing on Weber’s notion of traditionalism, seeks to explain what motivates companies to make such disclosures in a traditional setting. Annual reports of 23 banking companies in Bangladesh are analysed over the period 2009–2012. This is supplemented by a review of documentary evidence on the political and social activities of corporations and reports published in national and international newspapers. We found that, in the banking companies over the period (...)
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  • Public Actors Without Public Values: Legitimacy, Domination and the Regulation of the Technology Sector.Linnet Taylor - 2021 - Philosophy and Technology 34 (4):897-922.
    The scale and asymmetry of commercial technology firms’ power over people through data, combined with the increasing involvement of the private sector in public governance, means that increasingly, people do not have the ability to opt out of engaging with technology firms. At the same time, those firms are increasingly intervening on the population level in ways that have implications for social and political life. This creates the potential for power relations of domination, and demands that we decide what constitutes (...)
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  • The debate on the moral responsibilities of online service providers.Mariarosaria Taddeo & Luciano Floridi - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (6):1575-1603.
    Online service providers —such as AOL, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, and Twitter—significantly shape the informational environment and influence users’ experiences and interactions within it. There is a general agreement on the centrality of OSPs in information societies, but little consensus about what principles should shape their moral responsibilities and practices. In this article, we analyse the main contributions to the debate on the moral responsibilities of OSPs. By endorsing the method of the levels of abstract, we first analyse the moral responsibilities (...)
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  • Reasoned Moral Agreement: Applying Discourse Ethics within Organizations.Jason Stansbury - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (1):33-56.
    ABSTRACT:Whether at the executive or the line-management levels, businesspeople face moral decisions that cannot be easily resolved with reference to a shared ethos, whether because of diversity of ethea in the organization or its environment, or because the organization's ethos is inadequate for the problem at hand. These decisions are made more common by the changing norms of a pluralistic business environment, and require collective moral deliberation to be adequately resolved. Discourse ethics ideally characterizes the form of valid collective moral (...)
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  • Comment on Sonja Dänzer: Structural Injustice in Global Production Networks: Shared Responsibility for Working Conditions.Mark Starmanns - 2011 - Analyse & Kritik 33 (1):195-212.
    This commentary's claim is that Dänzer's argument does not sufficiently take into account the complexities of the global production of goods, the current corporate responsibility practices and the problems of attributing responsibility to single actors. I argue in favour of a shared responsibility and briefly present a discursive approach for attributing MNE's share of responsibility in global supply chains, which requires obligatory transparency.
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  • Justifying ethical values: A purposive ethics for managers.Robert Spillane & Jean-Etienne Joullié - 2022 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 31 (4):1185-1192.
    Business Ethics, the Environment &Responsibility, Volume 31, Issue 4, Page 1185-1192, October 2022.
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  • Marketing’s Consequences.N. Craig Smith, Guido Palazzo & C. B. Bhattacharya - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (4):617-641.
    While considerable attention has been given to the harm done to consumers by marketing, less attention has been given to the harm done by consumers as an indirect effect of marketing activities, particularly in regard to supply chains. The recent development of dramatically expanded global supply chains has resulted in social and environmental problems upstream that are attributable at least in part to downstream marketers and consumers. Marketers have responded mainly by using corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication to counter the (...)
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  • Constructing Illegitimacy? Cartels and Cartel Agreements in Finnish Business Media from Critical Discursive Perspective.Marjo E. Siltaoja & Meri J. Vehkaperä - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (4):493-511.
    During the last decade, any questionable or illegal behaviour on the part of businesses has received considerable attention in the media. Using a critical discursive perspective, we here investigate how the media constructs one type of questionable business as illegitimate. Our data draw upon articles dealing with cartels and cartel agreements in Finnish business media covering the five year period 2002-2007. Our contributions are following: We add to the current literature on CSR and national businesses, suggesting that regardless of globalization (...)
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  • Business in society or business and society: the construction of business–society relations in responsibility reports from a critical discursive perspective.Marjo E. Siltaoja & Tiina J. Onkila - 2013 - Business Ethics: A European Review 22 (4):357-373.
    In this article, we analyse the discursive construction of business–society relations in Finnish businesses’ social and environmental responsibility reports. Drawing on critical discourse analysis, we examine how these discursive constructions maintain and reproduce various interests and societal conditions as a precondition of corporate social responsibility (CSR). Our study contributes to the recent discussion on discursive struggles in business–society relations and the role various interests play in this struggle. We find that not only are power asymmetries between actors veiled through the (...)
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  • Firm-Level Determinants of Political CSR in Emerging Economies: Evidence from India.Vikrant Shirodkar, Eshani Beddewela & Ulf Henning Richter - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (3):673-688.
    Multinational companies (MNCs) frequently adopt corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities that are aimed at providing ‘public goods’ and influencing the government in policymaking. Such political CSR (PCSR) activities have been determined to increase MNCs’ socio-political legitimacy and to be useful in building relationships with the state and other key external stakeholders. Although research on MNCs’ PCSR within the context of emerging economies is gaining momentum, only a limited number of studies have examined the firm-level variables that affect the extent to (...)
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  • Understanding Widespread Misconduct in Organizations: An Institutional Theory of Moral Collapse.Masoud Shadnam & Thomas B. Lawrence - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (3):379-407.
    ABSTRACT:Reports of widespread misconduct in organizations have become sadly commonplace. Sexual abuse in the Catholic Church, accounting fraud in large corporations, and physical and sexual harassment in the military implicate not only the individuals involved, but the organizations and fields in which they happened. In this paper we describe such situations as instances of “moral collapse” and develop a multi-level theory of moral collapse that draws on institutional theory as its central orienting lens. We draw on institutional theory because of (...)
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  • From Greenwashing to Machinewashing: A Model and Future Directions Derived from Reasoning by Analogy.Peter Seele & Mario D. Schultz - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (4):1063-1089.
    This article proposes a conceptual mapping to outline salient properties and relations that allow for a knowledge transfer from the well-established greenwashing phenomenon to the more recent machinewashing. We account for relevant dissimilarities, indicating where conceptual boundaries may be drawn. Guided by a “reasoning by analogy” approach, the article addresses the structural analogy and machinewashing idiosyncrasies leading to a novel and theoretically informed model of machinewashing. Consequently, machinewashing is defined as a strategy that organizations adopt to engage in misleading behavior (...)
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  • Business Ethics without Philosophers? Evidence for and Implications of the Shift From Applied Philosophers to Business Scholars on the Editorial Boards of Business Ethics Journals.Peter Seele - 2016 - Metaphilosophy 47 (1):75-91.
    This article considers the relationship between business ethics and philosophy, specifically in relation to the field and persons working in it. The starting point is a grammatical one: business ethics by the rules of grammar belongs to ethics. In terms of academic disciplines, it belongs to applied ethics, which belongs to ethics, which belongs to practical philosophy, which belongs to philosophy. However, in the field of business ethics today one will seldom meet colleagues from philosophy; instead, they will come from (...)
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  • The Value of Unregulated Business-NGO Interaction.Andreas Scherer - 2014 - Business and Society 53 (2):157-186.
    Political theories in general and deliberative democracy in particular have become quite popular in business ethics over the past few years. However, the model of deliberative democracy as generally referred to in business ethics is only appropriate for conceptualizing interaction between business and society which occurs within a context which is more or less institutionalized. The model cannot account for “unregulated” interaction between business and civil society. The authors argue that scholars need to resort to the so called “critical strand” (...)
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  • The Political Role of the Business Firm.Andreas Scherer - 2014 - Business and Society 53 (2):226-259.
    This article contributes to the debate about the political role of the business firm. The article clarifies what is meant by the “political” role of the firm and how this political role relates to its economic role. To this end, the authors present an ordonomic concept of corporate citizenship and illustrate the concept by way of comparison with the Aristotelian idea of individual citizenship for the antique polis. According to our concept, companies take a political role if they participate in (...)
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  • The Enduring Potential of Justified Hypernorms.Markus Scholz, Gastón de los Reyes & N. Craig Smith - 2019 - Business Ethics Quarterly 29 (3):317-342.
    ABSTRACT:The profound influence of Thomas Donaldson and Thomas Dunfee’s integrative social contracts theory on the field of business ethics has been challenged by Andreas Scherer and Guido Palazzo’s Habermasian approach, which has achieved prominence of late with articles that expressly question the defensibility of ISCT’s hypernorms. This article builds on recent efforts by Donaldson and Scherer to bridge their accounts by providing discursive foundations to the hypernorms at the heart of the ISCT framework. Extending prior literature, we propose an ISCT* (...)
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  • Introduction to the Special Issue: Globalization as a Challenge for Business Responsibilities.Andreas Georg Scherer, Guido Palazzo & Dirk Matten - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (3):327-347.
    This article assesses some of the implications of globalization for the scholarly debate on business ethics, CSR and related concepts. The argument is based, among other things, on the declining capacity of nation state institutions to regulate socially desirable corporate behavior as well as the growing corporate exposure to heterogeneous social, cultural and political values in societies globally. It is argued that these changes are shifting the corporate role towards a sphere of societal governance hitherto dominated by traditional political actors. (...)
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  • The Construction of Corporate Social Responsibility in Network Societies: A Communication View. [REVIEW]Friederike Schultz, Itziar Castelló & Mette Morsing - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (4):681-692.
    The paper introduces the communication view on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), which regards CSR as communicatively constructed in dynamic interaction processes in today’s networked societies. Building on the idea that communication constitutes organizations we discuss the potentially indeterminate, disintegrative, and conflictual character of CSR. We hereby challenge established mainstream views on CSR such as the instrumental view, which regards CSR as an organizational instrument to reach organizational aims such as improved reputation and financial performance, and the political-normative view on CSR, (...)
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  • Trade associations and corporate social responsibility: Evidence from the UK water and film industries.Anja Schaefer & Finola Kerrigan - 2008 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 17 (2):171–195.
    In highly structured organisational fields individual efforts to deal rationally with uncertainty and constraints tend to lead, in the aggregate, to greater homogeneity in structure, culture and output. Drawing on institutional theory, this paper develops research propositions regarding the nature and scope of corporate social responsibility (CSR) engagement at trade/industry association level. The cases of the water and sewerage and film industries are used in order to test these propositions. The findings suggest that (a) trade associations in more homogeneous industries (...)
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  • Trade associations and corporate social responsibility: evidence from the UK water and film industries.Anja Schaefer & Finola Kerrigan - 2008 - Business Ethics: A European Review 17 (2):171-195.
    In highly structured organisational fields individual efforts to deal rationally with uncertainty and constraints tend to lead, in the aggregate, to greater homogeneity in structure, culture and output. Drawing on institutional theory, this paper develops research propositions regarding the nature and scope of corporate social responsibility (CSR) engagement at trade/industry association level. The cases of the water and sewerage and film industries are used in order to test these propositions. The findings suggest that (a) trade associations in more homogeneous industries (...)
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  • State Power: Rethinking the Role of the State in Political Corporate Social Responsibility.Judith Schrempf-Stirling - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (1):1-14.
    Key accomplishments of political corporate social responsibility scholarship have been the identification of global governance gaps and a proposal how to tackle them. Political CSR scholarship assumes that the traditional roles of state and business have eroded, with states losing power and business gaining power in a globalized world. Consequently, the future of CSR lies in political CSR with new global governance forms which are organized by mainly non-state actors. The objective of the paper is to deepen our understanding of (...)
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  • Reflexivity in Sustainability Accounting and Management: Transcending the Economic Focus of Corporate Sustainability.Anselm Schneider - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (3):525-536.
    In order to enable firms to successfully deal with issues of corporate sustainability, the firms' stakeholders would need to participate in sustainability accounting and management. In practice, however, participative sustainability accounting and management are often unfeasible. The resulting consequence is the risk of misbalancing single aspects of sustainability. The purpose of this article is to show that reflexivity in sustainability accounting and management, that is, an ongoing reflection on the relationship between the goals of corporate sustainability and the overarching objective (...)
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  • Introduction to the Special Issue: Globalization as a Challenge for Business Responsibilities.Andreas Georg Scherer, Guido Palazzo & Dirk Matten - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (3):327-347.
    This article assesses some of the implications of globalization for the scholarly debate on business ethics, CSR and related concepts. The argument is based, among other things, on the declining capacity of nation state institutions to regulate socially desirable corporate behavior as well as the growing corporate exposure to heterogeneous social, cultural and political values in societies globally. It is argued that these changes are shifting the corporate role towards a sphere of societal governance hitherto dominated by traditional political actors. (...)
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