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  1. Global Rules and Private Actors: Toward A New Role of The Transnational Corporation In Global Governance.Andreas Georg Scherer, Guido Palazzo & Dorothée Baumann - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (4):505-532.
    We discuss the role that transnational corporations should play in developing global governance, creating a frameworkof rules and regulations for the global economy. The central issue is whether TNCs should provide global rules and guarantee individual citizenship rights, or instead focus on maximizing profits. First, we describe the problems arising from the globalization process that affect the relationship between public rules and private firms. Next we consider the position of economic and management theories in relation to the social responsibility of (...)
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  • Embracing Ambiguity – Lessons From the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility Throughout the Rise and Decline of the Modern Welfare State.Anselm Schneider - 2014 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 23 (3):293-308.
    In the work of Karl Polanyi, the negative effects of a self‐regulating market economy are described as being limited by societal forces such as the policies of the welfare state. With the decline of the modern welfare state since the late 1970s, social activities of business firms are increasingly regarded as an important complement to or even as a substitute for welfare state policies by a part of the literature. However, and controversially, another stream of argumentation regards these activities as (...)
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  • The Political Ontology of Corporate Social Responsibility: Obscuring the Pluriverse in Place.Maria Ehrnström-Fuentes & Steffen Böhm - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-17.
    This article examines corporate social responsibility through the lens of political ontology. We contend that CSR is not only a discursive mean of legitimization but an inherently ontological practice through which particular worlds become real. CSR enables the politics of place-making, connecting humans and nonhumans in specific territorial configurations in accordance with corporate needs and interests. We discuss three CSR mechanisms of singularization that create a particular corporate ontology in place: community engagements that form ‘stakeholders’; CSR standards and certifications that (...)
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  • Value, Values, and Valuation: The Marketization of Charitable Foundation Impact Investing.Kirsten Andersen & Rebecca Tekula - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-20.
    Based on an abductive analytic study, we examine financial and social value incorporation in the multi-valued market of impact investing. This paper draws on interviews with investment professionals in 54 charitable foundations, intermediary and field building organizations in the impact investing market, to compare market objectives with practice, and to determine whether social and financial values are incorporated, thus producing ‘returns’ of both types through market exchange. We find unincorporated valuation is apparent at both the market level and for several (...)
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  • Stakeholder Theory: A Deliberative Perspective.Ulf Henning Richter & Kevin E. Dow - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (4):428-442.
    Organizations routinely make choices when addressing conflicting stakes of their stakeholders. As stakeholder theory continues to mature, scholars continue to seek ways to make it more usable, yet proponents continue to debate its legitimacy. Various scholarly attempts to ground stakeholder theory have not narrowed down this debate. We draw from the work of Juergen Habermas to theoretically advance stakeholder theory, and to provide practical examples to illustrate our approach. Specifically, we apply Habermas’ language-pragmatic approach to extend stakeholder theory by advancing (...)
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  • Trade Associations and Corporate Social Responsibility: Evidence From the UK Water and Film Industries.Anja Schaefer & Finola Kerrigan - 2008 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 17 (2):171–195.
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  • An Integrational Framework of Organizational Moral Development, Legitimacy, and Corporate Responsibility: A Longitudinal, Intersectoral Analysis of Citizenship Reports.Gabriella Lewis, Sergio Palacios & Marcus A. Valenzuela - 2016 - Business and Society Review 121 (4):593-623.
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  • Talk Ain’T Cheap: Political CSR and the Challenges of Corporate Deliberation.Cameron Sabadoz & Abraham Singer - 2017 - Business Ethics Quarterly 27 (2):183-211.
    ABSTRACT:Deliberative democratic theory, commonly used to explore questions of “political” corporate social responsibility, has become prominent in the literature. This theory has been challenged previously for being overly sanguine about firm profit imperatives, but left unexamined is whether corporate contexts are appropriate contexts for deliberative theory in the first place. We explore this question using the case of Starbucks’ “Race Together” campaign to show that significant challenges exist to corporate deliberation, even in cases featuring genuinely committed firms. We return to (...)
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  • Communicating Moral Legitimacy in Controversial Industries: The Trade in Human Tissue.A. Rebecca Reuber & Anna Morgan-Thomas - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (1):49-63.
    Globally active companies are involved in the discursive construction of moral legitimacy. Establishing normative conformance is problematic given the plurality of norms and values worldwide, and is particularly difficult for companies operating in morally controversial industries. In this paper, we investigate how organizations publicly legitimize the trade of human tissue for private profit when this practice runs counter to deep-seated and widespread moral beliefs. To do so, we use inductive, qualitative methods to analyze the website discourse of three types of (...)
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  • Ordo-Responsibility in the Sharing Economy: A Social Contracts Perspective.Stefan Hielscher, Sebastian Everding & Ingo Pies - 2022 - Business Ethics Quarterly 32 (3):404-437.
    Can private companies legitimately regulate sharing markets, and if yes, how? Whereas scholars have either criticized sharing platforms for expanding into private and public arenas or welcomed them to counterbalance encroaching government regulations, studies document their unbridled popularity. On the basis of a special version of social contracts theory pioneered by James Buchanan, we develop a heuristics that helps guide reasoning about the legitimacy of the sharing economy’s regulatory function. First, we discuss the conditions under which free and responsible individuals (...)
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  • Revisiting the Effect of Family Involvement on Corporate Social Responsibility: A Behavioral Agency Perspective.Victor Cui, Shujun Ding, Mingzhi Liu & Zhenyu Wu - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (1):291-309.
    This paper sheds light on the incongruent findings concerning the relationship between family involvement and firms’ corporate social responsibility. While prior studies have mainly taken the perspective of families’ socioemotional wealth preservation, we approach this relationship from the perspective of behavioral agency theory, highlighting the important role played by CEOs’ family memberships. Specifically, we posit that family firms are more likely to invest in CSR when their CEOs are members of the controlling families. Furthermore, we examine how family firms can (...)
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  • From Greenwashing to Machinewashing: A Model and Future Directions Derived From Reasoning by Analogy.Peter Seele & Mario D. Schultz - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (4):1063-1089.
    This article proposes a conceptual mapping to outline salient properties and relations that allow for a knowledge transfer from the well-established greenwashing phenomenon to the more recent machinewashing. We account for relevant dissimilarities, indicating where conceptual boundaries may be drawn. Guided by a “reasoning by analogy” approach, the article addresses the structural analogy and machinewashing idiosyncrasies leading to a novel and theoretically informed model of machinewashing. Consequently, machinewashing is defined as a strategy that organizations adopt to engage in misleading behavior (...)
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  • A Deliberative Case for Democracy in Firms.Andrea Felicetti - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (3):803-814.
    The increasing centrality of business firms in contemporary societies calls for a renewed attention to the democratization of these actors. This paper sheds new light on the possibility of democratizing business firms by bridging recent scholarship in two fields—deliberative democracy and business ethics. To date, deliberative democracy has largely neglected the role of business firms in democratic societies. While business ethics scholarship has given more attention to these issues, it has overlooked the possibility of deliberation within firms. As argued in (...)
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  • Assessing the Legitimacy of Corporate Political Activity: Uber and the Quest for Responsible Innovation.Gastón de los Reyes & Markus Scholz - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-19.
    Building on literature in political CSR and corporate political activity as well as responsible innovation and responsible lobbying, we introduce a framework to assess the legitimacy status of corporate political activity. We focus on the fact that companies frequently face sharp regulatory backlash after penetrating markets with their innovations. In response to regulatory backlash, big tech companies often employ an arsenal of corporate political activities to shape national and local regulatory environments, which raises the important questions about the legitimacy of (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility: Review and Roadmap of Theoretical Perspectives.Jędrzej George Frynas & Camila Yamahaki - 2016 - Business Ethics: A European Review 25 (3):258-285.
    Based on a survey and content analysis of 462 peer-reviewed academic articles over the period 1990–2014, this article reviews theories related to the external drivers of corporate social responsibility and the internal drivers of CSR that have been utilized to explain CSR. The article discusses the main tenets of the principal theoretical perspectives and their application in CSR research. Going beyond previous reviews that have largely failed to investigate theory applications in CSR scholarship, this article stresses the importance of theory-driven (...)
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  • The Escalation of Organizational Moral Failure in Public Discourse: A Semiotic Analysis of Nokia’s Bochum Plant Closure.Lauri Wessel, Riku Ruotsalainen, Henri A. Schildt & Christopher Wickert - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-20.
    We examine the processes involved in the escalation of a plant closure from a local concern to a perceived organizational moral failure that commands national attention. Our empirical case covers the controversy over the decision of telecommunications giant Nokia to close a plant in Germany, despite having received significant state subsidies, and the relocation of production to Hungary and Romania. We conducted an inductive study that utilizes a semiotic analysis to identify how various actors framed the controversial plant closure and (...)
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  • State Power: Rethinking the Role of the State in Political Corporate Social Responsibility.Judith Schrempf-Stirling - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (1):1-14.
    Key accomplishments of political corporate social responsibility scholarship have been the identification of global governance gaps and a proposal how to tackle them. Political CSR scholarship assumes that the traditional roles of state and business have eroded, with states losing power and business gaining power in a globalized world. Consequently, the future of CSR lies in political CSR with new global governance forms which are organized by mainly non-state actors. The objective of the paper is to deepen our understanding of (...)
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  • Towards an Understanding of Corporate (Dis)Engagement with Social Justice Advocacy.Louise Jones & Arnold Smit - 2022 - African Journal of Business Ethics 16 (1):62-80.
    If it can be argued that companies should engage with social justice advocacy, what factors might deter them from doing so? This question is pursued in a qualitative research study with participants from corporate and social justice organisations. Six inhibiting factors are identified: a lack of understanding of social justice concepts; fear of reputational risk; short-term profit orientation; a compliance mindset; disconnectedness from operating environment; and recognition that business purpose will determine its societal engagement. This research extends the theoretical and (...)
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  • Individuals’ Perceptions of the Legitimacy of Emerging Market Multinationals: Ethical Foundations and Construct Validation.Jianhong Zhang, David L. Deephouse, Désirée van Gorp & Haico Ebbers - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (4):801-825.
    Entry of new organizations, including multinational enterprises from emerging markets, raises the ethical question of will they benefit society. The concept of legitimacy answers this question because it is the overall assessment of the appropriateness of organizational ends and means. Moreover, gaining legitimacy enables EMNEs to succeed in new host countries. Past work examined collective level indicators of the legitimacy of MNEs, but recent research recognizes the importance of individuals’ perceptions as the micro-foundation of legitimacy. This study first uses new (...)
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  • Affects in Online Stakeholder Engagement: A Dissensus Perspective.Itziar Castelló & David Lopez-Berzosa - forthcoming - Business Ethics Quarterly:1-36.
    A predominant assumption in studies of deliberative democracy is that stakeholder engagements will lead to rational consensus and to a common discourse on corporate social and environmental responsibilities. Challenging this assumption, we show that conflict is ineradicable and important and that affects constitute the dynamics of change of the discourses of responsibilities. On the basis of an analysis of social media engagements in the context of the grand challenge of plastic pollution, we argue that civil society actors use mobilization strategies (...)
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  • Subsidiarity, Wicked Problems and the Matter of Failing States.Michael S. Aßländer - 2021 - Journal of Global Ethics 17 (3):285-301.
    In the political context, the tenet of subsidiarity states that societal tasks should be solved by subordinate entities in society if these entities have the competencies to solve such problems wit...
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  • Deliberating with the Autocrats? A Case Study on the Limitations and Potential of Political CSR in a Non-Democratic Context.Anna-Lena Maier & Dirk Ulrich Gilbert - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
    Extant literature on Political CSR and the role of governments in the governance of business conduct tends to neglect key implications of the political-institutional macro-context for public deliberation. Contextual assumptions often remain rather implicit, leading to the need for a more nuanced, explicit and context-sensitive exploration of the theoretical and practical boundary conditions of Political CSR. In non-democratic political-institutional contexts, political pluralism and participation are limited, and governmental agencies continue to play the most central role in regulation and its enforcement. (...)
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  • The Debate on the Moral Responsibilities of Online Service Providers.Mariarosaria Taddeo & Luciano Floridi - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (6):1575-1603.
    Online service providers —such as AOL, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, and Twitter—significantly shape the informational environment and influence users’ experiences and interactions within it. There is a general agreement on the centrality of OSPs in information societies, but little consensus about what principles should shape their moral responsibilities and practices. In this article, we analyse the main contributions to the debate on the moral responsibilities of OSPs. By endorsing the method of the levels of abstract, we first analyse the moral responsibilities (...)
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  • Making the Business Case for Corporate Social Responsibility and Perceived Trustworthiness: A Cross‐Stakeholder Analysis.Jared L. Peifer & David T. Newman - 2020 - Business and Society Review 125 (2):161-181.
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  • Contextualizing Corporate Political Responsibilities: Neoliberal CSR in Historical Perspective.Marie-Laure Djelic & Helen Etchanchu - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 142 (4):641-661.
    This article provides a historical contextualization of Corporate Social Responsibility and its political role. CSR, we propose, is one form of business–society interactions reflecting a unique ideological framing. To make that argument, we compare contemporary CSR with two historical ideal-types. We explore in turn paternalism in nineteenth century Europe and managerial trusteeship in early twentieth century US. We outline how the political responsibilities of business were constructed, negotiated, and practiced in both cases. This historical contextualization shows that the frontier between (...)
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  • The Political Perspective of Corporate Social Responsibility: A Critical Research Agenda.Glen Whelan - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (4):709-737.
    I here advance a critical research agenda for the political perspective of corporate social responsibility. I argue that whilst the ‘Political’ CSR literature is notable for both its conceptual novelty and practical importance, its development has been hamstrung by four ambiguities, conflations and/or oversights. More positively, I argue that ‘Political’ CSR should be conceived as one potential form of globalization, and not as a consequence of ‘globalization’; that contemporary Western MNCs should be presumed to engage in CSR for instrumental reasons; (...)
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  • The Role of Corporations in Shaping the Global Rules of the Game: In Search of New Foundations.J. van Oosterhout - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (2):253-264.
    Although a research focus on the increasing involvement of corporations in shaping and maintaining the global rules of the game points out promising avenues for future research, it simultaneously makes clear how little currently established, mostly managerialconceptual frameworks have to offer in making sense of these developments. It is argued that we need to expand the rather restricted perspectives that these frameworks provide, in order to explore new conceptual foundations that will not only enable us to travel theconfines of the (...)
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  • Understanding Widespread Misconduct in Organizations: An Institutional Theory of Moral Collapse.Masoud Shadnam & Thomas B. Lawrence - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (3):379-407.
    Reports of widespread misconduct in organizations have become sadly commonplace. Sexual abuse in the Catholic Church, accounting fraud in large corporations, and physical and sexual harassment in the military implicate not only the individuals involved, but the organizations and fields in which they happened. In this paper we describe such situations as instances of “moral collapse” and develop a multi-level theory of moral collapse that draws on institutional theory as its central orienting lens. We draw on institutional theory because of (...)
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  • Introduction to the Special Issue: Globalization as a Challenge for Business Responsibilities.Andreas Georg Scherer, Guido Palazzo & Dirk Matten - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (3):327-347.
    This article assesses some of the implications of globalization for the scholarly debate on business ethics, CSR and related concepts. The argument is based, among other things, on the declining capacity of nation state institutions to regulate socially desirable corporate behavior as well as the growing corporate exposure to heterogeneous social, cultural and political values in societies globally. It is argued that these changes are shifting the corporate role towards a sphere of societal governance hitherto dominated by traditional political actors. (...)
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  • Global Rules and Private Actors: Toward a New Role of the Transnational Corporation in Global Governance.Andreas Georg Scherer, Guido Palazzo & Dorothée Baumann - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (4):505-532.
    : We discuss the role that transnational corporations should play in developing global governance, creating a framework of rules and regulations for the global economy. The central issue is whether TNCs should provide global rules and guarantee individual citizenship rights, or instead focus on maximizing profits. First, we describe the problems arising from the globalization process that affect the relationship between public rules and private firms. Next we consider the position of economic and management theories in relation to the social (...)
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  • Post-Westphalia and Its Discontents: Business, Globalization, and Human Rights in Political and Moral Perspective.Michael A. Santoro - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (2):285-297.
    This article examines the presuppositions and theoretical frameworks of the “new-wave” “Post-Westphalian” approach to international business ethics and compares it to the more philosophically oriented moral theory approach that has predominated in the field. I contrast one author’s Post-Westphalian political approach to the human rights responsibilities of transnational corporations with my own “Fair Share” theory of moral responsibility for human rights. I suggest how the debate about the meaning of corporate human rights “complicity” might be informed by the fair share (...)
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  • Global Policies and Local Practice: Loose and Tight Couplings in Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives.Andreas Rasche - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (4):679-708.
    This paper extends scholarship on multi-stakeholder initiatives in the context of corporate social responsibility in three ways. First, I outline a framework to analyze the strength of couplings between actors participating in MSIs. Characterizing an MSI as consisting of numerous local networks that are embedded in a wider global network, I argue that tighter couplings and looser couplings coexist. Second, I suggest that this coexistence of couplings enables MSIs to generate policy outcomes which address the conditions of a transnational regulatory (...)
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  • Advancing the Business and Human Rights Agenda: Dialogue, Empowerment, and Constructive Engagement.Sébastien Mena, Marieke de Leede, Dorothée Baumann, Nicky Black, Sara Lindeman & Lindsay McShane - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 93 (1):161 - 188.
    As corporations are going global, they are increasingly confronted with human rights challenges. As such, new ways to deal with human rights challenges in corporate operations must be developed as traditional governance mechanisms are not always able to tackle them. This article presents five different views on innovative solutions for the relationships between business and human rights that all build on empowerment, dialogue and constructive engagement. The different approaches highlight an emerging trend toward a more active role for corporations in (...)
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  • Private Political Authority and Public Responsibility: Transnational Politics, Transnational Firms, and Human Rights.Stephen J. Kobrin - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (3):349-374.
    Transnational corporations have become actors with significant political power and authority which should entail responsibility and liability, specifically direct liability for complicity in human rights violations. Holding TNCs liable for human rights violations is complicated by the discontinuity between the fragmented legal/political structure of the TNC and its integrated strategic reality and the international state system which privileges sovereignty and non-intervention over the protection of individual rights. However, the post-Westphalian transition—the emergence of multiple authorities, increasing ambiguity of borders and jurisdiction (...)
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  • From Implicit to Explicit Corporate Social Responsibility: Institutional Change as a Fight for Myths.Stefanie Hiss - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (3):433-451.
    The focus of this paper is institutional change and the changing role of business in Germany. Back in the 1980s, the German institutional framework was characterized by implicit mandatory and obligatory regulations that set a clear context for responsible corporate behavior. Today, this framework has eroded and given way to a situation in which corporations explicitly and voluntarily take responsibility for social issues. This shift from implicit to explicit corporate social responsibility is an indication of a major institutional change epitomized (...)
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  • When Organization Theory Met Business Ethics: Toward Further Symbioses.Pursey P. M. A. R. Heugens & Andreas Georg Scherer - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (4):643-672.
    Organization theory and business ethics are essentially the positive and normative sides of the very same coin, reflecting on how human cooperative activities are organized and how they ought to be organized respectively. It is therefore unfortunate that—due to the relatively impermeable manmade boundaries segregating the corresponding scholarly communities into separate schools and departments, professional associations, and scientific journals—the potential symbiosis between the two fields has not yet fully materialized. In this essay we make a modest attempt at establishing further (...)
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  • Patterns of Social Reporting From an Islamic Framework and the Moral Legitimacy Factors That Influence Them.Anna Che Azmi, Normawati Non & Norazlin Aziz - 2020 - Business Ethics: A European Review 29 (4):763-779.
    Business Ethics: A European Review, EarlyView.
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  • Participation Versus Consent: Should Corporations Be Run According to Democratic Principles?Stefan Hielscher, Markus Beckmann & Ingo Pies - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (4):533-563.
    ABSTRACT:The notion of “democracy” has become a much-debated concept in scholarship on business ethics, management, and organization studies. The strategy of this paper is to distinguish between a principle of organization that fosters participation and a principle of legitimation that draws on consent. Based on this distinction, we highlight conceptual shortcomings of the literature on stakeholder democracy. We demonstrate that parts of the literature tend to confound ends with means. Many approaches employ type I democracy notions of participation and often (...)
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  • Business Ethics Without Philosophers? Evidence for and Implications of the Shift From Applied Philosophers to Business Scholars on the Editorial Boards of Business Ethics Journals.Peter Seele - 2016 - Metaphilosophy 47 (1):75-91.
    This article considers the relationship between business ethics and philosophy, specifically in relation to the field and persons working in it. The starting point is a grammatical one: business ethics by the rules of grammar belongs to ethics. In terms of academic disciplines, it belongs to applied ethics, which belongs to ethics, which belongs to practical philosophy, which belongs to philosophy. However, in the field of business ethics today one will seldom meet colleagues from philosophy; instead, they will come from (...)
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  • Neither Bad Apple nor Bad Barrel: How the Societal Context Impacts Unethical Behavior in Organizations.Michael Gonin, Guido Palazzo & Ulrich Hoffrage - 2012 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 21 (1):31-46.
    Every time another corporate scandal captures media headlines, the ‘bad apple vs. bad barrel’ discussion starts anew. Yet this debate overlooks the influence of the broader societal context on organizational behavior. In this article, we argue that misbehaviors of organizations (the ‘barrels’) and their members (the ‘apples’) cannot be addressed properly without a clear understanding of their broader context (the ‘larder’). Whereas previously, a strong societal framework dampened the practical application of the Homo economicus concept (business actors as perfectly rational (...)
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  • Lobbying and the Responsible Firm: Agenda‐Setting for a Freshly Conceptualized Field.Stephanos Anastasiadis, Jeremy Moon & Michael Humphreys - 2018 - Business Ethics: A European Review 27 (3):207-221.
    “Responsible lobbying” is an increasingly salient topic within business and management. We make a contribution to the literature on “responsible lobbying” in three ways. First, we provide novel definitions and, thereby, make a clear distinction between lobbying and corporate political activity. We then define responsible lobbying with respect to its content, process, organization, and environment, resulting in a typology of responsible lobbying, a conceptual model that informs the rest of the paper. Second, the paper provides a thematic overview of the (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility as Cultural Meaning Management: A Critique of the Marketing of 'Ethical' Bottled Water.Vinicius Brei & Steffen Böhm - 2011 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 20 (3):233-252.
    To date, the primary focus of research in the field of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has been on the strategic implications of CSR for corporations and less on an evaluation of CSR from a wider political, economic and social perspective. In this paper, we aim to address this gap by critically engaging with marketing campaigns of so-called ‘ethical’ bottled water. We especially focus on a major CSR strategy of a range of different companies that promise to provide drinking water for (...)
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  • Business in Society or Business and Society: The Construction of Business–Society Relations in Responsibility Reports From a Critical Discursive Perspective.Marjo E. Siltaoja & Tiina J. Onkila - 2013 - Business Ethics: A European Review 22 (4):357-373.
    In this article, we analyse the discursive construction of business–society relations in Finnish businesses’ social and environmental responsibility reports. Drawing on critical discourse analysis, we examine how these discursive constructions maintain and reproduce various interests and societal conditions as a precondition of corporate social responsibility (CSR). Our study contributes to the recent discussion on discursive struggles in business–society relations and the role various interests play in this struggle. We find that not only are power asymmetries between actors veiled through the (...)
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  • Legitimacy and Cosmopolitanism: Online Public Debates on (Corporate) Responsibility.Anne Vestergaard & Julie Uldam - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (2):227-240.
    Social media platforms have been vested with hope for their potential to enable ‘ordinary citizens’ to make their judgments public and contribute to pluralized discussions about organizations and their perceived legitimacy :60–97, 2018). This raises questions about how ordinary citizens make judgements and voice them in online spaces. This paper addresses these questions by examining how Western citizens ascribe responsibility and action in relation to corporate misconduct. Empirically, it focuses on modern slavery and analyses online debates in Denmark on child (...)
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  • Counter-reporting sustainability from the bottom up: the case of the construction company WeBuild and dam-related conflicts.Antonio Bontempi, Daniela Del Bene & Louisa Jane Di Felice - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-26.
    Controversies around large-scale development projects offer many cases and insights which may be analyzed through the lenses of corporate social responsibility and business ethics studies. In this paper, we confront the CSR narratives and strategies of WeBuild, an Italian transnational construction company. Starting from the Global Atlas of Environmental Justice, we collect evidence from NGOs, environmental justice organizations, journalists, scholars, and community leaders on socio-environmental injustices and controversies surrounding 38 large hydropower schemes built by the corporation throughout the last century. (...)
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  • A Moral Grounding of the Duty to Further Justice in Commercial Life.Wim Dubbink - 2015 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (1):27-45.
    This paper argues that economic agents, including corporations, have the duty to further justice, not just a duty merely to comply with laws and do their share. The duty to further justice is the requirement to assist in the establishment of just arrangements when they do not exist in society. The paper is grounded in liberal theory and draws heavily on one liberal theorist, Kant. We show that the duty to further justice must be interpreted as a duty of virtue (...)
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  • Pluralism in Political Corporate Social Responsibility.Jukka Mäkinen & Arno Kourula - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (4):649-678.
    Within corporate social responsibility (CSR), the exploration of the political role of firms (political CSR) has recently experienced a revival. We review three key periods of political CSR literature—classic, instrumental, and new political CSR—and use the Rawlsian conceptualization of division of moral labor within political systems to describe each period’s background political theories. The three main arguments of the paper are as follows. First, classic CSR literature was more pluralistic in terms of background political theories than many later texts. Second, (...)
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  • Moral Commitments and the Societal Role of Business: An Ordonomic Approach to Corporate Citizenship.Markus Beckmann - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (3):375-401.
    This article introduces an “ordonomic” approach to corporate citizenship. We believe that ordonomics offers a conceptual framework for analyzing both the social structure and the semantics of moral commitments. We claim that such an analysis can provide theoretical guidance for the changing role of business in society, especially in regard to the expectation and trend that businesses take a political role and act as corporate citizens. The systematic raison d’être of corporate citizenship is that business firms can and—judged by the (...)
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  • Moral Commitments and the Societal Role of Business: An Ordonomic Approach to Corporate Citizenship.Ingo Pies, Stefan Hielscher & Markus Beckmann - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (3):375-401.
    This article introduces an “ordonomic” approach to corporate citizenship. We believe that ordonomics offers a conceptual framework for analyzing both the social structure and the semantics of moral commitments. We claim that such an analysis can provide theoretical guidance for the changing role of business in society, especially in regard to the expectation and trend that businesses take a political role and act as corporate citizens. The systematic raison d’être of corporate citizenship is that business firms can and—judged by the (...)
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  • The Moral Legitimacy of NGOs as Partners of Corporations.Dorothea Baur & Guido Palazzo - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):579-604.
    Partnerships between companies and NGOs have received considerable at­tention in CSR in the past years. However, the role of NGO legitimacy in such partnerships has thus far been neglected. We argue that NGOs assume a status as special stakeholders of corporations which act on behalf of the common good. This role requires a particular focus on their moral legitimacy. We introduce a conceptual framework for analysing the moral legitimacy of NGOs along three dimensions, building on the theory of deliberative democracy. (...)
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