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  1. When Workplace Norms Conflict: Using Intersubjective Reflection to Guide Ethical Decision-Making.Tobey K. Scharding & Danielle E. Warren - forthcoming - Business Ethics Quarterly:1-29.
    We address how to ethically evaluate workplace practices when workplace behavioral norms conflict with employees’ attitudes toward those norms, which, according to research on psychological contract violations, regularly occurs. Drawing on Scanlonian contractualism, we introduce the intersubjective reflection process. The IR process ethically evaluates workplace practices according to whether parties to a workplace practice have intersubjectively valid grounds to veto the practice. We present normative and empirical justification for this process and apply the IR process to accounts of workplace moral (...)
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  • Ethical Hazards: A Motive, Means, and Opportunity Approach to Curbing Corporate Unethical Behavior. [REVIEW]Shripad G. Pendse - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 107 (3):265-279.
    Scandals in companies such as Enron have been a source of great concern in the last decade. The events that led to a global financial crisis in 2008 have heightened this concern. How does one account for executive behaviors that led to such a crisis? This article argues that a conjunction of motive, means, and opportunity creates ‘an ethical hazard’ making questionable executive decisions more probable. It then suggests that corporate unethical behavior can be minimized by creating a process to (...)
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  • A “Black Box” of Stakeholder Thinking.Kalle Pajunen - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (S1):27-32.
    The existence of a firm can be seen as a necessary condition for the existence of stakeholders. However, in the stakeholder literature, the firm has remained a relatively underdeveloped and fuzzy construct. In this essay, we examine how the firm has been conceptualized (explicitly or implicitly) in earlier research and suggest that, at least in stakeholder thinking, the firm can be considered as having an emergent nature. We elaborate this idea by building on the resent philosophical discussions of emergence and, (...)
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  • Analyzing the Essence of Stakeholder Relationships: What Do We Need in Addition to Power, Legitimacy, and Urgency? [REVIEW]Päivi Myllykangas, Johanna Kujala & Hanna Lehtimäki - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (S1):65-72.
    This article contributes to the body of stakeholder literature by providing an in-depth analysis of the dynamics of stakeholder relationships as a part of change in value creation. The article presents an argument that the stakeholder salience model as a tool for analyzing stakeholder relationships is not sufficient for understanding business value creation. In the recent stakeholder literature, understanding business value creation has become an important theme. Through an analysis of an empirical case, the article shows how the three stakeholder (...)
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  • Managers’ Moral Obligation of Fairness to (All) Shareholders: Does Information Asymmetry Benefit Privileged Investors at Other Shareholders’ Expense?Jocelyn D. Evans, Elise Perrault & Timothy A. Jones - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 140 (1):81-96.
    Drawing on ethical principles of fairness and integrative social contracts theory, moral obligations of fair dealing exist between the firm and all shareholders. This study investigates empirically whether privileged investors of publicly traded firms engage in legal, but morally questionable, trading that at the expense of non-privileged institutional or atomistic investors. In this context, we define privilege as the access to material, nonpublic earnings surprise information. Our results show that the opportunity for procedural unfairness increases with the presence of privileged (...)
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  • The Effects of Interfirm Ties on Illegal Corporate Behavior.Jamie D. Collins & Christopher R. Reutzel - 2017 - Business and Society Review 122 (2):251-282.
    Although numerous benefits are associated with interfirm ties, these external relationships can also have negative consequences. Theoretically based in the relational component of social capital, we identify one potentially serious consequence of interfirm ties, propensity of firms engaging in illegal behavior. Results of our study of S&P 500 firms suggest that companies benefit from a lower likelihood of illegal behavior when they have numerous weak ties to other firms. Conversely, when they become overly embedded in a network of strong ties, (...)
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  • Institutional Pressures and Ethical Reckoning by Business Corporations.Frances Chua & Asheq Rahman - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (2):307 - 329.
    Prior studies have provided explanations for the presence, use and dissemination of codes of corporate ethics or codes of corporate conduct of business corporations. Most such explanations are functional in nature, and are descriptive as they are derived from the codes and their associated documents. We search for more underlying explanations using two complementary theories: first, social contract theories explaining the exogenous and endogenous reasons of organizational behavior, and then institutional theory explaining why organizations take similar measures in response to (...)
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