Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Ethnic/Local, the National and the Global: Global Citizenship Education in South Sudan.Merethe Skårås, Tami Carsillo & Anders Breidlid - 2020 - British Journal of Educational Studies 68 (2):219-239.
    This article explores local, national and global aspects of the new national curriculum in South Sudan as reflected in the lived experiences of secondary school teachers. We draw on analyses of the curriculum, semi-structured interviews with 21 secondary school teachers, and classroom observations. We emphasize the need for critical global citizenship education addressing inequity and oppression at national and global levels. We argue that the curriculum rhetoric fostering global citizens is strongly disconnected from the lived experiences of the teachers, where (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Global citizenship, migration and national curriculum: A tale of two nations.Timothy Patterson & Yoonjung Choi - 2018 - British Journal of Educational Studies 66 (4):477-496.
    Scotland and South Korea are experiencing novel challenges in educating for and about migrant populations. Through a critical discourse analysis of these nations’ national curricula, we consider the guidance educators are offered in teaching about issues related to migration in increasingly diverse classrooms. Framed by theories of critical global citizenship, our analysis suggests that both curricula use ambiguous approaches to global citizenship education. These curricula acknowledge the presence of migrants without disturbing stable visions of Korean and Scottish national identities. Such (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • In service of the western World: Global citizenship education within a Ghanaian elite context.Adam Howard, Patrick Dickert, Gerald Owusu & DeVaughn Riley - 2018 - British Journal of Educational Studies 66 (4):497-514.
    This article employs postcolonial perspectives to examine the possibilities and limitations of drawing on Pan-African ideas to establish practices and meanings for global citizenship education at an elite secondary school in Ghana. In this examination, the authors explore the ways in which the school’s interventions to reinforce sameness/unity produce different understandings of global citizenship between students from different social class backgrounds. The article addresses how the school attempts to dissociate students from their native cultures for the purpose of teaching them (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Global Citizenship Education in the Era Of Mobility, Conflict and Globalisation.Miri Yemini, Heela Goren & Claire Maxwell - 2018 - British Journal of Educational Studies 66 (4):423-432.
  • Global citizens, cosmopolitanism, and radical relationality: Towards dialogue with the Kyoto School?Satoji Yano & Jeremy Rappleye - 2022 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 54 (9):1355-1366.
    Recent discussions around education for global citizenship continues to retrace notions of cosmopolitanism first laid out in Europe. Ostensibly seeking global inclusivity, much of this work ultimately returns to a rather narrow set of ontological and epistemic themes, primarily Stoicism and Pauline Christianity. The Kyoto School offers a constructive reconstruction of these core premises of European cosmopolitanism. In resisting the ontologizing of autonomous individualism and abstract universalism, Kyoto School thinkers offered an alternative tripartite structure that drew greater attention to the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Global Citizenship Identification and Religiosity.Stephen Reysen, Iva Katzarska-Miller & Carole A. Barnsley - 2014 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 36 (3):344-367.
    In four studies we examine the associations between religiosity, global citizenship identification, and various kinds of values. Across the studies, general trends emerged showing that religiosity is unrelated to global citizenship identification, and positively related to exclusionary values. However, examination of the varied motivations to be religious showed that quest religious motivation is positively related to global citizenship identification, as well as inclusionary and prosocial values. Furthermore, quest religious motivation was found to positively influence the antecedents and outcomes of global (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Youth negotiation of citizenship identities in Pakistan: Implications for global citizenship education in conflict-contexts.Laila Kadiwal & Naureen Durrani - 2018 - British Journal of Educational Studies 66 (4):537-558.
  • Three faces of global citizenship education: IB Schools’ self-representations in four local contexts.Yuval Dvir, Robin Shields & Miri Yemini - 2018 - British Journal of Educational Studies 66 (4):455-475.
  • Global Citizenship Education, Global Educational Injustice and the Postcolonial Critique.Johannes Drerup - 2020 - Global Justice : Theory Practice Rhetoric 12 (1):27-54.
    This contribution develops a defence of a universalist conception of Global Citizenship Education against three prominent critiques, which are, among others, put forward by postcolonial scholars. The first critique argues that GCE is essentially a project of globally minded elites and therefore expressive both of global educational injustices and of the values and lifestyles of a particular class or milieu. The second critique assumes that GCE is based on genuinely ‘Western values’, which are neither universally accepted nor universally valid and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Educating Global Britain: Perils and Possibilities Promoting ‘National’ Values through Critical Global Citizenship Education.Philip Bamber, Andrea Bullivant, Alison Clark & David Lundie - 2018 - British Journal of Educational Studies 66 (4):433-453.