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  1. Leaping Up the Phylogenetic Scale in Explaining Anxiety: Perils and Possibilities.Marvin Zuckerman - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):505-506.
  • Loss of Familiarity as an Explanation of Autobiographical Memory Loss.Joseph Zubin - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):41-42.
  • ECT: Out of the Shadows and Into the Light.Steven F. Zornetzer - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):41-41.
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  • Functional Distinctions Within the Medical Temporal Lobe Memory System: What is the Evidence?Stuart Zola-Morgan & Pablo Alvarez - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):495-496.
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  • In Support of Cognitive Theories.Thomas R. Zentall - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):654.
  • Is “Behaviorism at Fifty” Twenty Years Older?Everett J. Wyers - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):653.
  • The Septo-Hippocampal System and Behavior: Difficulties in Finding the Exit.Michael L. Woodruff - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):504-504.
  • Operant Conditioning and Behavioral Neuroscience.Michael L. Woodruff - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):652.
  • Effects of Hippocampal Lesions on Some Operant Visual Discrimination Tasks.Michael L. Woodruff & Dennis L. Whittington - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (3):513-514.
  • Behavioral Effects of Neural Grafts: Action Still in Search of a Mechanism.Michael L. Woodruff - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):75-76.
    This commentary reviews data supporting circuitry reconstruction, replacement neurotransmitters, and trophic action as mechanisms whereby transplants promote recovery of function. Issue is taken with the thesis of Sinden et al. that adequate data exist to indicate that reconstruction of hippocampal circuitry damaged by hypoxia with CA1 transplants is a confirmed mechanism whereby these transplants produce recovery. Sinden et al.'s and Stein & Glasier's proposal that there is definitive evidence showing that all transplants produce trophic effects is also questioned.
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  • Memory: Two Systems or One System with Many Subsystems?G. Wolters - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):256.
  • The Hippocampus and Time.Gordon Winocur - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (3):512-513.
  • The Hippocampus and Attention.Gordon Winocur - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (1):132-133.
  • The Heterogeneity and Plasticity of Cerebral Structures.Bruno E. Will, John C. Dalrymple-Alford & Georges Di Scala - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (1):131-132.
  • Hippocampal Neuronal Activity in Rat and Primate: Memory and Movement.Frasar A. W. Wilson - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):499-500.
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  • Will Brain Tissue Grafts Become an Important Therapy to Restore Visual Function in Cerebrally Blind Patients?Reinhard Werth - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):74-74.
    Grafting embryonic brain tissue into the brain of patients with visual field loss due to cerebral lesions may become a method to restore visual function. This method is not without risk, however, and will only be considered in cases of complete blindness after bilateral occipital lesions, when other, risk-free neuropsychological methods fail.
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  • The Development of Concepts of the Mental World.Henry M. Wellman - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):651.
  • ECT: Facts, Affects, and Ambiguities.Richard D. Weiner - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):42-54.
  • Does Electroconvulsive Therapy Cause Brain Damage?Richard D. Weiner - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):1-22.
    Although the use of ECT has declined dramatically from its inception, this decrease has recently shown signs of leveling out because of ECT's powerful therapeutic effect in severely ill depressed individuals who either do not respond to pharmacologic alternatives or are too ill to tolerate a relatively lengthy drug trial. Notwithstanding its therapeutic benefits, ECT has also remained a controversial treatment modality, particularly in the eye of the public. Given the unsavory qualities associated with the word “electroconvulsive,” claims of possible, (...)
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  • ECT Damage: Are There More Pressing Problems?Lelon A. Weaver - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):39-40.
  • Cognitive Maps: Dimensionality and Development.J. Jacques Vonèche - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):519-520.
  • Is Hippocampal Rhythmical Slow Activity Specifically Related to Movement Through Space?C. M. Vanderwolf - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):518-519.
  • Substrates of Anxiety: But If the Starting Point is Wrong?Holger Ursin - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):503-504.
  • Anatomical Units in Psychology.Holger Ursin - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):518-518.
  • What Do Animal Models of Memory Model?Endel Tulving & Hans J. Markowitsch - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):498-499.
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  • Relations Among Components and Processes of Memory.Endel Tulving - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):257.
  • Précis of Elements of Episodic Memory.Endel Tulving - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):223.
  • Episodic and Semantic Memory: Where Should We Go From Here?Endel Tulving - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):573-577.
  • Looking for Nodes and Edges.Arnold Trehub - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):650-651.
  • The Hippocampus Seen in the Context of Declarative and Procedural Control.Frederick Toates - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):771-772.
  • Models, Yes; Homunculus, No.Frederick M. Toates - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):650.
  • A Model of the Hierarchy of Behaviour, Cognition, and Consciousness.Frederick Toates - 2006 - Consciousness and Cognition 15 (1):75-118.
    Processes comparable in important respects to those underlying human conscious and non-conscious processing can be identified in a range of species and it is argued that these reflect evolutionary precursors of the human processes. A distinction is drawn between two types of processing: stimulus-based and higher-order. For ‘higher-order,’ in humans the operations of processing are themselves associated with conscious awareness. Conscious awareness sets the context for stimulus-based processing and its end-point is accessible to conscious awareness. However, the mechanics of the (...)
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  • Just How Does Ecphory Work?Guy Tiberghien - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):255.
  • “Model Systems” Versus “Neuroethological” Approach to Hippocampal Function.Richard F. Thompson, Paul R. Solomon & Donald J. Weisz - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):517-518.
  • Cognition, Memory, and the Hippocampus.Garth J. Thomas - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):515-517.
  • Are Radical and Cognitive Behaviorism Incompatible?Roger K. Thomas - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):650.
  • Exploration and Memory.Catherine Thinus-Blanc - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (3):552.
  • “Mental Way Stations” in Contemporary Theories of Animal Learning.William S. Terry - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):649.
  • ECT and Brain Damage: How Much Risk is Acceptable?Donald I. Templer - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):39-39.
  • ECT: The Controversy Continues.John R. Taylor - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):38-39.
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  • Recognition and Recall: The Direct Comparison Experiment.Hidetsugu Tajika - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):254.
  • The Justification for Electroconvulsive Therapy.Conrad M. Swartz - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):37-38.
  • The Anatomy of a Cognitive Map.L. W. Swanson - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):515-515.
  • Gene Therapy and Neural Grafting: Keeping the Message Switched On.C. N. Svendsen & S. B. Dunnett - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):73-74.
    A major problem in developing an effective gene therapy for the nervous system lies in understanding the principles that maintain or turn off the expression of genes following their transfer into the CNS.
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  • What Can Neuroanatomy Tell Us About the Functional Components of the Hippocampal Memory System?Wendy A. Suzuki - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):496-498.
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  • ECT: A Clinician's Viewpoint.A. Arthur Sugerman - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):37-37.
  • Pathway Rewiring with Neural Transplantation.Piergiorgio Strata & Ferdinando Rossi - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):73-73.
    A lesion to the brain is not necessary for a successful neural transplantation. Embryonic Purkinje cells placed on the surface of an uninjured adult cerebellum can develop and migrate into the host molecular layer. Both the Purkinje cells that migrated into the host cerebellum and those that remained in the graft were innervated by collateral sprouting of adult intact climbing fibers.
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  • Is Behaviorism Vacuous?Stephen P. Stich - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):647.
  • Some Practical and Theoretical Issues Concerning Fetal Brain Tissue Grafts as Therapy for Brain Dysfunctions.Donald G. Stein & Marylou M. Glasier - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):36-45.
    Grafts of embryonic neural tissue into the brains of adult patients are currently being used to treat Parkinson's disease and are under serious consideration as therapy for a variety of other degenerative and traumatic disorders. This target article evaluates the use of transplants to promote recovery from brain injury and highlights the kinds of questions and problems that must be addressed before this form of therapy is routinely applied. It has been argued that neural transplantation can promote functional recovery through (...)
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  • Neural Grafting in Human Disease Versus Animal Models: Cautionary Notes.Kathy Steece-Collier - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):71-72.
    Over the past two decades, research on neural transplantation in animal models of neurodegeneration has provided provocative in sights into the therapeutic use of grafted tissue for various neurological diseases. Although great strides have been made and functional benefits gained in these animal models, much information is still needed with regard to transplantation in human patients. Several factors are unique to human disease, for example, age of the recipient, duration of disease, and drug interaction with grafted cells; these need to (...)
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