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  1. Abuse of Ministerial Authority, Systemic Perjury, and Obstruction of Justice: Corruption in the Shadows of Organizational Practice. [REVIEW]Seraphim Voliotis - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (4):537-562.
    Organizational corruption has recently attracted considerable scholarly attention, especially since its devastating effects following recent major corporate scandals, the worldwide economic crisis of 2009, and the current European Union monetary crisis. This paper is based on the analysis of three distinct, yet contextually related, case studies in a European Union member state: (a) an incident of corruption by a minister in an adjudicative role, (b) widespread financial misreporting and perjury within an organization, and (c) abuse of due process and obstruction (...)
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  • Effects of Implicit Negotiation Beliefs and Moral Disengagement on Negotiator Attitudes and Deceptive Behavior.Kevin Tasa & Chris M. Bell - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 142 (1):169-183.
    In three studies, we examined the relationship between implicit negotiation beliefs, moral disengagement, and a negotiator’s ethical attitudes and behavior. Study 1 found correlations between an entity theory that negotiation skills are fixed rather than malleable, moral disengagement, and appropriateness of marginally ethical negotiation tactics. Mediation analysis supported a model in which moral disengagement facilitated the relationship between entity theory and support for unethical tactics. Study 2 provided additional support for the mediation model in a sample of MBA students, whereby (...)
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  • A Lie Is a Lie: The Ethics of Lying in Business Negotiations.Charles N. C. Sherwood - 2022 - Business Ethics Quarterly 32 (4):604-634.
    I argue that lying in business negotiations is pro tanto wrong and no less wrong than lying in other contexts. First, I assert that lying in general is pro tanto wrong. Then, I examine and refute five arguments to the effect that lying in a business context is less wrong than lying in other contexts. The common thought behind these arguments—based on consent, self-defence, the “greater good,” fiduciary duty, and practicality—is that the particular circumstances which are characteristic of business negotiations (...)
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  • How Could You Be so Gullible? Scams and Over-Trust in Organizations.Hervé Laroche, Véronique Steyer & Christelle Théron - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (3):641-656.
    Trust is a key ingredient of business activities. Scams are spectacular betrayals of trust. When the victim is a powerful organization that does not look vulnerable at first sight, we can suspect that this organization has developed an excessive trust, or over-trust. In this article, we take over-trust as the result of the intentional production of gullibility by the scammer. The analysis of a historically famous scam case, the Elf “Great Sniffer Hoax,” suggests that the victim is made gullible by (...)
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  • More Than Lip Service: The Development and Implementation Plan of an Ethics Decision-Making Framework for an Integrated Undergraduate Business Curriculum. [REVIEW]Brian W. Kulik - 2009 - Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (4):231-254.
    In the face of the business community’s widening concern about corporate ethical behavior, business schools are reexamining how they ensure that students appreciate the ethical implications of managerial decision making and have the analytical tools necessary to confront ethical dilemmas. The current approaches adopted by colleges vary from mere ‘lip service’ to embedding ethics at the core of the curriculum. This paper examines the experience of several US universities that have incorporated business ethics into their curricula. In particular, the paper (...)
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  • Emotional Intelligence and Deception: A Theoretical Model and Propositions.Joseph P. Gaspar, Redona Methasani & Maurice E. Schweitzer - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (3):567-584.
    Deception is pervasive in negotiations and organizations, and emotions are critical to using, detecting, and responding to deception. In this article, we introduce a theoretical model to explore the interplay between emotional intelligence and deception in negotiations. In our model, we propose that emotional intelligence influences the decision to use deception, the effectiveness of deception, the ability to detect deception, and the consequences of deception. We consider the emotional intelligence of both deceivers and targets, and we consider characteristics of negotiators, (...)
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  • Confident and Cunning: Negotiator Self-Efficacy Promotes Deception in Negotiations.Joseph P. Gaspar & Maurice E. Schweitzer - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (1):139-155.
    Self-confidence is associated with many positive outcomes, and training programs routinely seek to build participants’ self-efficacy. In this article, however, we consider whether self-confidence increases unethical behavior. In a series of studies, we explore the relationship between negotiator self-efficacy—an individual’s confidence in his or her negotiation ability—and the use of deception. We find that individuals high in negotiator self-efficacy are more likely to use deception than individuals low in negotiator self-efficacy. We also find that perceptions of the risk of deception (...)
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  • Monitoring the Ethical Use of Sales Technology: An Exploratory Field Investigation. [REVIEW]Victoria Bush, Alan J. Bush & Linda Orr - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (2):239 - 257.
    The use of technology in marketing has become an increasingly important competitive tool in developing and maintaining efficient and productive customer relationships. However, the ethics of using this technology has received little attention. This study investigates how and if marketing organizations are adapting their ethics policies to incorporate use of sales technology (ST). Based on in-depth interviews with executives from a variety of highly regulated to nonregulated business-to-business and business-to-consumer industries, our results show that, although most organizations indeed have codes (...)
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  • Deonance and Distrust: Motivated Third Party Information Seeking Following Disclosure of an Agent’s Unethical Behavior. [REVIEW]Chris M. Bell & Kelley J. Main - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (1):77-96.
    This article explores the hypothesis that third parties are motivated to seek information about agents who have behaved unethically in the past, even if the agent and available information are irrelevant to the third parties’ goals and interests. We explored two possible motives for this information seeking behavior: deonance, or the motive to care about ethics and justice simply for the sake of ethics and justice, and distrust-based threat monitoring. Participants in a consumer decision task were found to seek out (...)
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